Course and Curriculum Design

Online Course Design

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Understanding how time “works” in online teaching and course design is often a challenge for online instructors, especially those new to online education. Four distinct yet related questions can express the challenge:

  • How do we determine the total time on task by online students per week and for the entire course?
  • How do we calculate how much time students will need to complete the course tasks?
  • What should students be doing with their time to accomplish the goals of the course?
  • What should faculty be doing with their time as online instructor?   

The academic credit model, developed on the Carnegie unit over 100 years ago, is based on classroom hours for students and corresponding contact hours for faculty. Online courses appear not to fit this model, as by definition they do not have face-to-face classroom/seat time. The consensus within U.S. higher education is that one college credit requires 15 hours of classroom time plus additional homework time for students (typically two or three hours per hour of classroom time). How, then, can this model accommodate courses that have no seat time?

The answer to this question is to de-emphasize the course mode (or course-delivery method) and focus instead on total time on task (by course and/or week). This approach was adopted by the Rochester Institute of Technology and is the approach taken by Bowling Green State University.

An example of an official policy for BGSU of time on task is the following:

Time on task is the total learning time spent by a student in a college course, including instructional time as well as time spent studying and completing course assignments (e.g., reading, research, writing, individual and group projects.) The Ohio Department of Higher Education has defined a credit hour as a minimum of 2250 minutes (37.5 hours) of instructional time.   Conventional classroom education normally breaks down into 12.5 hours of instruction plus 25 hours of student work/study out of class.  BGSU has adopted the ODHE definition of a credit hour.

"Instruction" is provided differently in online courses than in face-to-face courses. Despite the difference in methodology and activities, however, the total "learning time" online can usually be counted. Rather than try to distinguish between "in-class" and "outside-class" time for students, the faculty member developing and/or teaching the online course should calculate how much time a student doing exemplary work would take to complete the work of the course, including:

  • Reading course presentations/"lectures"
  • Engaging “other” media-based materials
  • Planning, conducting, research
  • Writing papers or other assignments
  • Constructing lab-based projects (maker-projects I.e., models, large print posters)
  • Composing performances
  • Creating works of art
  • Completing all other assignments (e.g., projects, problem sets)
  • Participating in peer-to-peer interactions such as discussion replies or workshop activities

The total time spent on these tasks should be roughly equal to that spent on comparable tasks in a classroom-based course. Time spent downloading or uploading documents, troubleshooting technical problems, or in chat rooms (unless on course assignments such as group projects) should not be counted.

In determining the time on task for an online course, useful information includes:

  • The course objectives and expected learning outcomes
  • The list of topics in the course outline or syllabus; instructional materials including textbooks, lectures, additional readings, multimedia components, and other resources
  • Stements in course materials informing students of the time and/or effort they are expected to devote to the course or individual parts of it
  • A list of instructional activities to be implemented in the online course, how each will be carried out, the pedagogical tools to be used, and the expectations for participation

 

Theoretically, one should be able to measure any course, regardless of delivery method, by the description of content covered. However, this is difficult for anyone other than the course developer or instructor to determine accurately, since the same statement of content (in a course outline or syllabus) can represent many different levels of breadth and depth in the treatment of that content, and require widely varying amounts of time.

In sum, regardless of course mode or type of learning activities assigned, the amount of student time on task for any BGSU course (campus, online, blended, independent study, etc.) should total 37.5 hours (2250 minutes) per credit/contact hour. For a 3-credit course, a total of 112.5 (6750 minutes) hours would be estimated for course completion.

The hours per week will, of course, vary depending upon the length (in weeks) of the course. See Figure 1 below for a breakdown of the time on task for BGSU ’s major 3-credit course formats. The second column provides the total hours per week that students will need to complete their course work. For a 7-week online course, for example, the instructor and/or course developer knows that students can expect to spend about, but certainly no more than, 16 hours per week on course work.

Figure 1. Learning hours per week for BGSU’s major 3-credit course formats

Course format in weeks

Total hours per week

Total hours per 3-credit course

15

7.5 (450 minutes)

112.5

8

14 (840 minutes)

112.5

7

16 (960 minutes)

112.5

6

18.7 (1122 minutes)

112.5

3

37.5 (2250 minutes)

112.5

The above guidelines address how to determine not only total time on task, but also the time needed to complete specific learning tasks. For a variety of factors, it is far more challenging to determine the latter than the former. (One of the biggest factors, of course, is student variability in ability, experience, and motivation.)

Nonetheless, the higher education literature does offer at least four viable methods for calculating completion times for learning tasks in any course mode:

  • The proxy method. Here the instructor and/or course designer first calculates how much time it takes them to complete a given task, and this figure is then multiplied by some factor. As Carnegie Mellon University (2013) explains to their faculty, “To calculate how long it will take students to read an article or complete an assignment, you can estimate that your students will take three to four times longer to read than it takes you.” The Course Workload Estimator is a tool for faculty or course designers to calculate time on task: https://cat.wfu.edu/resources/tools/estimator2/.
  • The experiential method. The least studied, but probably the most common method. As McDaniel (2011) wrote, “Faculty can use their experience to estimate the time and effort needed by the typical student to engage successfully in each of the learning activities in a particular field, course, and program…Using these estimates, the designers of courses determine if students have the requisite time to meet course expectations.”
  • The survey method. Involves surveying students after they have completed a given task. Carnegie Mellon University (2013) advises faculty “to ask students how long it took them to do various assignments and use this information in future course planning.”

BGSU recommends instructors prioritize use of the proxy method and Course Workload Estimator tool, however, instructors may use a combination of any of the three methods as needed

Having addressed the determination of time on task, and the calculation of completion times for learning tasks, the matter of what students can and should be doing with their time to effectively and efficiently accomplish the goals and learning outcomes for their online courses will now be addressed.

Despite some significant differences in communication technologies and pedagogical methods, online courses are similar to face-to-face courses in many important respects. As we have seen, total time on task is the same for online and on-campus courses of equal lengths. Additionally, an online course will have the identical goals and learning outcomes as its on-campus counterpart. The online course must be equal in content and challenge as the on-campus course (Vai & Sosulski, 2011). Online courses that do not have on-campus, or face-to-face equivalents must still have time-on-task activities that meet the necessary time-requirements for the number of credit hours in the course.

How students spend their time in on-campus and online courses is directly related to the assignments, assessments, and other tasks given by instructors. In the classroom portion of face-to-face courses, students typically engage in the following activities:

  • Listen to and take notes on lectures, presentations, and multimedia.
  • Participate in whole-class and small-group discussions with other students and the instructor.
  • Engage in experiential learning activities, such as labs, studios, and simulations.
  • Practice developing new competencies.
  • Contribute to formative and summative assessment practices through quizzes or exams.
  • Write short in-class essays.
  • Collaborate with peers on group projects.
  • Communicate with instructor on course related experiences.

Students typically do the following as outside-class activities in face-to-face courses:

  • Read articles and books
  • Review class notes
  • Solve homework problems
  • Conduct and write-up research
  • Complete projects and other major assignments
  • Prepare classroom presentations
  • Meet with instructors during their office hours
  • Collaborate with peers on group projects

The same categories of learning tasks or activities exist in both course modes, though online instructors usually modify the face-to-face activities to make best use of online communication technologies and pedagogies. (It should be noted that face-to-face instructors are increasingly incorporating online learning tools and methods into their courses.)

Boston University offers several representative samples of face-to-face learning activities that have been modified for the online learning environment:

  • Instructor may pre-record lectures with slides and annotation tools as for synchronous lecture; chunk lectures into sections of up to 10 minutes and intersperse with activity; additional tips for creating
  • Virtual Small Groups can be formed in to focus on topic for timed period (e.g. 1-3 days) and then report back to larger group through whole-class forum through text, audio, or video
  • The whole-class asynchronous discussion area will allow the instructor to expand upon the lecture and also facilitates post-lecture Q & A and general student interaction.

As these samples suggest, online teaching and course design incorporates and, at the same time, changes the discrete on-campus activities. The online lecture is both lecture and reading. Individual time and effort spent in small-group work is visible and therefore measurable (unlike face-to-face group work) and consists of research, reading, and writing. Experiential learning activities include student reports back to the instructor and/or the entire class. The online discussion is reading, writing, and (ideally) part of the instructor’s “lecture” component (Turner, 2005).

EXAMPLE TASKS AND COMPLETION TIMES FOR ONE WEEK OF AN ONLINE COURSE

Here is an example of one week (7.5 hours) of learning tasks or activities and respective completion times for a 15-week, 3-credit course:

  • Three, 15-minute chunked lectures (text or video) that cover one course topic each; links to illustrative web resources are included in each mini-lecture (1 hour).
  • Assume that students spend additional time to review these lectures and explore the links to web resources (1/2 hour).
  • After reading/viewing the mini-lectures, students will post a short “knowledge check” self-assessment statement to the course drop box. This activity will help the student gauge his/her understanding and retention of the lecture material (1/2 hour).
  • Assign readings (1/2 hour).
  • Require students to complete a 10-item online quiz to check their understanding of key terms and concepts from the readings and lectures (1/2 hour).
  • Assign a discussion topic on a contemporary issue with a triple-layer response requirement (i.e., original post, responses to three classmates’ posts, responses to responses) (2 hours).
  • Stipulate that small groups meet in their web-conferencing “room” and/or asynchronous discussion area to work on an iterative deliverable for their group project; for example, discussing and producing an outline of their final report (1 hour).
  • Work on final research paper and presentation, which are due at the end of the course (1 1/2 hours).

The following (Vai & Sosulski, 2011) is most likely how an instructor spends their time in an online course (assuming, that is, they are both designing and teaching the course):

  • Designing the course. Ideally this is accomplished before the course begins.

Instructors who have never designed an online course are encouraged to take ‘An Introduction to Online/Remote Course Design and Teaching’, which is offered by the Center for Faculty Excellence.

  • Posting new material after the course has been fully designed and is “live.”

In response to contemporary events and student needs/interests, the instructor is putting up announcements, calling attention to relevant material outside the course shell, posting commentaries on the discussions and other activities in the course, etc., as needed.

  • Checking in on student interactions, participation, and questions about the course

This most typically happens in a dedicated discussion area (i.e., a Q & A or Ask the Instructor discussion forum), but also in email and in other ways and “places” online, such as blogs, wikis, web-conferencing meetings, etc.

  • Giving feedback on assignments.

Activities such as providing written comments (along with grades) when using the grade book and giving more extensive written feedback on student worked that is submitted.

  • Class management.

Includes activities such as sending out reminders of assignments that are due, grouping/pairing of students for team projects, and introducing new assignments and requirements.

Regular and Substantive Interaction

The Department of Education also requires that instructors in distance education (online programs) provide “regular and substantive interaction” students.  “Regular and Substantive Interaction” is the primary distinction between distance education (online education) and correspondence education. This distinction is very important for the appropriate use of federal student aid. “Regular and substantive interaction” is not well defined in the federal registry. However common practice, based on Dear Colleague letters and ED investigations of other institutions, has determined that “regular and substantive interaction” has the following characteristics:

  1. Interaction must be initiated by the Instructor.
  2. Interaction must be “regular” and probably somewhat frequent.
  3. Interaction must be “substantive” – of an academic nature.
  4. Interaction must be with an instructor who meets accrediting agency standards.

Beer, N. (2019) Estimating student workload during the learning design of online courses:Creating a student workload calculator. In: Proceedings of the 18th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2019. Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, Reading, pp. 629-638.

Boston University (2022). “A Quick Guide to Converting Your Face-to-Face Pedagogical Approaches to the Online Environment " Center for Teaching & Learning: Boston University.” Center for Teaching Learning RSS. Accessed June 13, 2022. https://www.bu.edu/ctl/converting-face-to-face-pedagogical-approaches-online/.

Carnegie Mellon University, 2013. Solve a teaching problem: Assign a reasonable amount of work. Retrieved July 3, 2013, from http://www.cmu.edu/teaching//solveproblem/strat-lackmotivation/lackmotivation-05.html#strat1.

McDaniel, E. A. (2011). Level of student effort should replace contact time in course design. Journal of Information Technology Education, 10(10).

McDaniels, Melissa, Christine Pfund, and Katherine Barnicle. “Creating Dynamic Learning Communities in Synchronous Online Courses: One Approach from the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL).” Online Learning. Online Learning Consortium, Inc. P.O. Box 1238, Newburyport, MA 01950. Web site: http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/online-learning-journal/, February 29, 2016. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1096380.

New York State Education Department, Office of College and University Evaluation (2013). Policies: Determining time on task in online education. Retrieved October 11, 2020 http://www.nysed.gov/college-university-evaluation/distance-education-program-policies

Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York and London: Routledge.

This work, "BGSU| ONLINE COURSE DESIGN | TIME ON TASK ", is a derivative of “RIT | ONLINE COURSE DESIGN | TIME ON TASK” by Michael Starenko used under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/  -  https://www.rit.edu/academicaffairs/tls/course-design/online-courses/time-task

Course Design Resources

Example Syllabi Statements

This page has examples of statements related to establishing clear course expectations for student learning and behavior included in BGSU course syllabi.  Example statements related to the following topics are provided:

  • Expectations for Behavior
  • Expectations for Learning
  • Expectations for Technology 

The course title in red denotes the example syllabus from which the example was taken.

Expectations for Behavior

Example #1
Students are expected to display tolerance and respect in all communication. Communicate with others the same way you would in a traditional classroom. Comments and language should be respectful and appropriate for a college community. All comments should also follow acceptable grammar and spelling. (LIB 2210)

Example #2 For this class to be effective, you must be an active participant.  You are expected to contribute to each class session.  This includes asking questions, answering others questions, and adding relevant information.  The more spontaneous you can be with your contributions, the better.  I will periodically call on people to find out what they are thinking and to bring them into the conversation.
 
Another part of being an active participant is how you react to others.  There are things that we can all learn from each other, so we must treat each other with respect and dignity.  This means allowing everyone to share their ideas and carefully considering their input.  No on should ever be put down for his/her contributions. (CDIS 4760)

Expectations for Learning

Example #1
By the end of this experience you will:

  • Understand and remember key concepts and terms that apply to research in communication disorders
  • Identify and give details on questions being asked by individual research studies
  • Create your own research questions to determine ways to answer them
  • Be able to read and evaluate research articles and presentations
  • Understand how research in communication disorders is conducted and how it relates to clinical practice
  • Gain hands-on experience with research in communication disorders

(CDIS 4760)
 
Example #2
The purpose of this course is to enable students to find, evaluate, and use information resources to develop the skills necessary for becoming information savvy, and for becoming life-long learners. Students completing the course will be able to:

  • Determine the nature and extent of the information needed
  • Access needed information effectively and efficiently 
  • Evaluate information sources critically and incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information critically and legally 

(LIB 2210)
 
Example #3
For each module, you will study the textbook chapter and the accompanying instructor presentation and web links which will be available to you. At the end of each module, you can test your understanding of the concepts by doing practice problems which will be posted online. Solutions to these practice problems will also be posted online.  Review sheets summarizing the important concepts will be made available to you.  
(CHEM 1000)

Expectations for Technology

Example #1
You are welcome to use laptops, cell phones, and other forms of technology within the classroom.  However, they should only be used for completing classroom activities.  You are not allowed to send or receive texts or calls that do not pertain to the class.  If you are expecting a call that you must take, notify me before the session starts, set your phone to vibrate, and leave the room to take the call.
 
I reserve the right to confiscate technological devices that are not being used for classroom activities.  You will receive them back at the end of the session. (CDIS 4760)
 
Example #2
To be successful in this online class you should be confortable using a computer for the following functions:

  • Using a word processor (changing font, spell check)
  • Using email for communication
  • Sending an email attachment
  • Navigating and searching the Internet
  • Downloading files and appropriate plugins
  • Taking screen shots of your deliverables
  • Converting material to PDF documents

Example #3
Clickers. Each student must have a TurningPoint clicker. They are available at Falcon Outfitters. The purpose is to do class polling, get feedback, take attendance, take quizzes, etc.. You must register your clicker on Canvas using the 6-digit Device ID number (on the back of the clicker) before class on T 8/28.  For instructions, please open Canvas and go to Modules > Canvas > Registering Your Clicker.  Contact the Learning Commons if you have problems: www.bgsu.edu/learningcommonsTLC@bgsu.edu (enter “Canvas” in the subject line of the email), 419.372.2823.
(FN 3100)

This page has a few examples of and formats for schedules and methods of assessment included in BGSU course syllabi. It is important to note that the schedule and method of assessment should connect with the student learning outcomes of the course. In addition, providing students with prompt and frequent feedback on their performance, which may or may not contribute to their overall grade in the course, is critically important to fostering student learning and success.

This page has a few examples of and formats for schedules and methods of assessment included in BGSU course syllabi. It is important to note that the schedule and method of assessment should connect with the student learning outcomes of the course. In addition, providing students with prompt and frequent feedback on their performance, which may or may not contribute to their overall grade in the course, is critically important to fostering student learning and success.

Example #1: Outcome and Assessment Table(EDTL 2503)

Course Objectives Sessions Taught Assessed
1. Demonstrate how reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and thinking are interrelated. #1, 2, 3, 4, 7, & 15 Mini-Lesson Think Aloud in a Read Aloud Class Participation Final Exam
2. Analyze an aligned ELA lesson plan that includes Common Core State Standards, Objectives, Assessments and Procedures. #3 & #7 Mini-Lesson Final Exam
3. Examine, evaluate, and select teaching strategies and resources that support the teaching of E/LA. #4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, & 15 Mini-Lesson Think Aloud in a Read Aloud Class Participation Final Exam
4. Attend classroom settings to observe and assist students and teachers during language arts lessons. In Field
Case Study
5. Develop a presentation that includes information about at least one specific teacher’s responsibilities. Based on Field Work Case Study
6. Develop a positive disposition toward the implementation of stimulating curricula, effective teaching, commitment to learning with understanding, and the use of a variety of teaching tools. #1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, & 15 Mini-Lesson Think Aloud in a Read Aloud Class Participation Reader Response

Example #2: (EDTL 2710)

Course Objectives:
The student will be able to:                                                         
Evidence that the objective has been met:

1. Demonstrate how language arts instruction is grounded in the integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visual representation in meaningful ways. Unit Mapping, Active Learning Lesson, 7 Ways project
2. Examine, evaluate, and select resources, such as textbooks and other print materials, video, film, recordings, websites, and software that support the teaching of English Language Arts. Active Learning Lesson, Website Analysis
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts in the Integrated Language Arts curriculum included in the Common Core Standards. 7 Ways project, Standards assessment assignments, Grammar assignments, writing assignments, Active Learning Lesson
4. Attend classroom settings to assist classroom teachers and BGSU student teachers, as well as observe and interview teachers to understand their job. Daily Prompt Responses, Teacher Profile Project (TPP)
5. Develop presentations that demonstrate their understanding of the complexities of teaching the language arts, as well as the specific responsibilities of the language arts teacher. Teacher Profile Project,
Fry Readability
6. Develop a conceptual framework for teaching and learning in the Integrated Language Arts. Teacher Profile Project
7. Develop an orientation to technology and its application in the Integrated Language Arts. Active Learning Lesson
Website Analysis
8. Develop a positive disposition toward the implementation of stimulating curricula, effective teaching, commitment to learning with understanding, and the use of a variety of teaching tools. Teacher Profile Project, Mini Unit Final Project

Example #3: Grading/Assessment Scheme

On-line weekly quizzes: 15% of total
Midterm: 15% of total
Final exam: 15% of total
In-class assignments/quizzes/note checks: 15% of total
Paper:15% of total
Concert attendance papers: 25% of total (Five concerts at 5% each)
(MUCT 2210)

Example #4: Grading/Assessment Scheme(CHEM 1000)

Your percentage in the course will be calculated based on the table shown below:

Online discussion board participation 5%

Online assignment(s)

10%

Online quizzes

5%

Exams (I, II, III) (proctored)

48%

Projects

10%

Extra credit

2%
Comprehensive final exam (proctored) 20%

Example #5:  Assessment and Grading Scale (EDFI 6770)

You can check their grades 24/7 online within the Canvas site.  You will receive prompt, quantitative feedback for every assignment. This means that scores will be provided to you using the assignment rubrics so that you can be aware of the degree to which you met assignment requirements.

Grade % Pts. Meaning
A 100-90 440-396 Illustrated outstanding command of learning objectives; went beyond required expectations for course activities and assignments.
B 89-80 395-352 Illustrated high degree of competency of learning objectives; met required expectations for course activities and assignments.
C 79-70 351-308 Illustrated minimal competency of learning objectives; met required expectations for course activities and assignments.
D 69-60 307-364 Did not illustrate minimal competency of learning objectives; do not meet expectations for course activities and assignments.

This page has examples of statements related to support for student success included in BGSU course syllabi. Example statements related to the following topics are provided:

The course title in red denotes the example syllabus from which the example was taken.

Academic Honesty Policy / Codes of Conduct

Example #1
The instructor and students in this course will adhere to the University’s general Codes of Conduct defined in the BGSU Student Handbook. The Code of Academic Conduct (Academic Honesty Policy) requires that students do not engage in academic dishonesty. For details, refer to the BGSU Codes of Conduct site at https://www.bgsu.edu/student-handbook/code-of-conduct.html.   

The instructor and students will adhere to the general Code of Academic Conduct as outlined of the BGSU Student Handbook. Specifically, students will not cheat, fabricate, plagiarize or facilitate academic dishonesty. Students who passively engage in cheating (i.e. allowing others to cheat off of them) may receive the same consequences as the person copying. In group work, if your partner or teammates do all the work on an assignment, you should not be listed as a contributor and should receive no credit for that work. If you allow an assignment to be submitted listing you as a contributor, but you did not contribute, this is equivalent to plagiarism. (OR3800)

Example #2
The instructor and students in this course will adhere to the University’s general Codes of Conduct defined in the BGSU Student Handbook.  Specifically, the Code of Academic Conduct (Academic Honesty Policy) requires that students do not cheat, fabricate, plagiarize or facilitate academic dishonesty. For details, refer to:

Example #3
The Code of Academic Conduct (also called the Academic Honesty Policy) is designed to enhance and sustain an environment of ethical and principled intellectual pursuit, consistent with the core values of the university.  BGSU does not tolerate cheating, lying, or stealing of property or ideas.  See me before doing anything that you suspect may violate these policies. (CDIS 4760)

Example #4
Please familiarize yourself with the Code of Conduct (Academic Honesty Policy) in BGSU’s Student Handbook: https://www.bgsu.edu/student-handbook/code-of-conduct.html. This requires that students do NOT cheat, forge, bribe, threaten, fabricate, plagiarize, or facilitate academic dishonesty.  These violations are taken seriously.  You will, at a minimum, receive partial or zero credit on the assignment and may fail the course, at Dr. Ludy’s discretion. (FN 3100)

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Classroom Expectations/Inclusion

Example #1
Students are expected to display tolerance and respect in all communication. Communicate with others the same way you would in a traditional classroom. Comments and language should be respectful and appropriate for a college community. All comments should also follow acceptable grammar and spelling. (LIB 2210)

Example #2
For this class to be effective, you must be an active participant.  You are expected to contribute to each class session.  This includes asking questions, answering others questions, and adding relevant information. The more spontaneous you can be with your contributions, the better.  I will periodically call on people to find out what they are thinking and to bring them into the conversation.

Another part of being an active participant is how you react to others. There are things that we can all learn from each other, so we must treat each other with respect and dignity. This means allowing everyone to share their ideas and carefully considering their input.  No on should ever be put down for his/her contributions. (CDIS 4760)

Example #3
Students are expected to display tolerance and respect in all communication.  Communicate with others the same way you would in a traditional classroom.  Comments and language should be respectful and appropriate for a college community.  All comments should also follow acceptable grammar and spelling. (LIB 2210)

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Accessibility Services

Example #1
If you have a disability that I should be aware of, please notify me so that I can make arrangements to accommodate your learning needs. To get more information about your rights, contact the Accessibility Services office (https://www.bgsu.edu/accessibility-services.html) for Students located in 38 College Park, 419-372-8495. (LIB 2210)

If you have a documented disability which might require modifications in a particular assignment, please contact me at least a week prior to the assignment’s due date to assist you with its realignment. Accessibility Services is to help provide equal access and reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities attending BGSU. Students wishing to discuss their eligibility for such accommodations are encouraged to contact the office at 419/372-8495. (OR3800)

Example #2
Any student who requires accommodation based on a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss specific needs. In accordance with the University policy, if the student has a documented disability and requires accommodations to obtain equal access in this course, he or she should contact the instructor at the beginning of the semester and make this need known. Students with disabilities must verify their eligibility through Accessibility Services (https://www.bgsu.edu/accessibility-services.html), 38 College Park, 419-372-8495.

Educator candidates are expected to respect all individuals, regardless of characteristics or background, and endeavor to accommodate communications and actions to learning differences arising from cultural, linguistic and disability origins. (EDTL 2710)

Example #3
I want nothing to interfere with your ability to perform well in this course. If you have a significant problem that might weaken your performance, please talk to me and/or someone from the Accessibility Services Office. The goal of the Accessibility Services is to help provide equal access and reasonable accommodations to BGSU students with disabilities. You can contact them by phone at 372-8495, fax 372-8496, or on the web at https://www.bgsu.edu/accessibility-services.html (CDIS 4760)

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Learning Commons

Example #1

The Learning Commons is the destination for students that are seeking success in their academic careers at BGSU. Support from the Learning Commons includes Math & Stats tutoring, writing consultations, tech tutoring, and both small group and drop-in tutoring for courses. Academic coaches assist students with developing and perfecting their study habits to ensure a successful college career, and academic workshops are available covering a wide range of topics. All tutors, consultants, and coaches in the Learning Commons are highly qualified and trained following the guiding principles of the College Reading and Learning Association. Students can connect with the Learning Commons in multiple ways: http://www.bgsu.edu/learning-commons.htmltlc@bgsu.edu, or 419-372-2823.

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Religious Holidays

Example #1
It is the policy of the University to make every reasonable effort to allow students to observe their religious holidays without academic penalty. In such cases, it is the obligation of the student to provide the instructor with reasonable notice of the dates of religious holidays on which he or she will be absent. Absence from classes or examinations for religious reasons does not relieve the student of responsibility for completing required work missed. Following the necessary notification, the student should consult with the instructor to determine what appropriate alternative opportunity will be provided, allowing the student to fully complete his or her academic responsibilities. (As stated in The Academic Charter, B-II.G-4.b at: http://www.bgsu.edu/downloads/file919.pdf. (EDTL 2710)

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Technology Support

Example #1:
Information Technology Services (ITS)  
Provides a central point of contact for faculty, staff and students for questions, problem reports, service requests and inquiries for University computer systems and communications technologies at BGSU. Contact ITS via chat. Phone: (419) 372-0999.

Example #2:

The Learning Commons and Tech Tutoring

The Learning Commons provides academic technology support for all BGSU students. Tech tutors assist students to help them gain knowledge and work effectively with the technology they are required to use at BGSU. Available services and times for help: https://www.bgsu.edu/learning-commons/Tech-tutoring.html.

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University Libraries

Example #1:
The University Libraries supports the teaching, learning and research mission of BGSU by advancing scholarship and creativity through collections and user-centered services that connect faculty and students to high quality information resources. For more information, to reserve a study space or to make an appointment: http://www.bgsu.edu/library.html ; http://www.bgsu.edu/library/ask-us.html ; 419-372-6943; libhelp@bgsu.edu . (S. Bushong)
 
Example #2:
The main page for the BGSU library, which includes mobile access, is located at http://www.bgsu.edu/library.html. If you need research assistance, visit the Ask Us! webpage at http://www.bgsu.edu/library/ask-us.html to contact us by IM, text, email, or phone. You can also book a 1-hour research consultation with a librarian at https://bgsu.libcal.com/appointments/ira.  (LIB 2210)

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Veterans

Example #1:
STUDENT VETERAN-FRIENDLY CAMPUS
BGSU educators recognize student veterans’ rights when entering and exiting the university system. If you are a student veteran, please communicate with your instructor so reasonable accommodations can be made for absence when drilling or being called to active duty. See (http://www.bgsu.edu/veteran/) for more information. (LIB 2210)

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Counseling Center

Example #1:
The BGSU Counseling Center is an available resource for students who are experiencing difficulties with a variety of stressors and/or mental health concerns.  Services include group and individual counseling, consultation, educational groups and workshops, crisis intervention, alcohol and drug prevention and intervention, and campus programming to foster mental wellness, grit, and skills for helping others.  Counseling Center services are confidential and covered by your standard student fees.  To access services, contact the Center during call-in hours (10am-4pm) at 419-372-2081.  For emergencies, an on-call counselor is available on weekdays from 8a to 5pm, using the same phone number.  For emergencies after hours and on weekends, you can call the Wood County Crisis Line at 419-502-HOPE(4673); it operates 24/7.  More information on services and resources as well as mental health and wellness can be found at www.bgsu.edu/counseling.

This page has examples of statements related to pedagogical efforts to engage students in the learning process included in BGSU course syllabi.  The course title in red denotes the example syllabus from which the example was taken.

Example #1:

The instructor will integrate teaching strategies including, but not limited to: lecture, large and small group discussion, cooperative learning, role play, drama, games, case studies, internet and video.  Throughout this course, students will be expected to work independently and in groups to learn about characteristics of middle childhood students and the teaching of integrated language arts in the middle grades. (EDTL 2503)
 

Example #2:

The class will be conducted in a seminar style.  Almost all of class time will involve group discussion – either in teams or as the whole class.  As this is an honors course, it is expected that students will be prepared for each class meeting.  There will be few, if any, lectures.  Therefore, you must read assigned material ahead of time.  REPEAT: READ ASSIGNED MATERIAL BEFORE CLASS.  You will be responsible for knowing it at the beginning of class.  It will show if you are not prepared.
(HONORS 2010)
 

Example #3:

The classroom sessions will be based on group activities and discussions.  You will be expected to contribute in both of these areas.  This means that you will share your insights, including what you know and what you have questions about.  For some people, talking in a group can be difficult.  For almost everyone, sharing what you are unsure of or don’t know is risky and uncomfortable.  However, the best learning occurs because of the questions that you ask.  You will find that asking questions is the key to your education and to your future success as a professional. (CDIS 3110)
 

Example #4:

This class is grounded in the philosophy of collaborative inquiry (CI).  CI is described by Bray, Lee, Smith, and Yorks (2000) as “a process consisting of repeated episodes of reflection and action through which a group of peers strives to answer a question of importance to them” (p.6).  CI requires that each participant is active “in his or her own meaning-making by using processes that ground new knowledge in personal experience” (Kasl & Yorks, 2002, p. 5).  Two critical questions that we will be addressing in this course is “How do students learn?” and “How can we improve our practice as teachers to improve student learning?”   To address these questions, various learning activities will be utilized that require students’ thoughtful preparation and participation. (EDFI 6770)

Updated: 11/09/2022 01:43PM