NCFMR

The National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR) was established in 2007 to improve our understanding of how family structure is linked to the health and well-being of children, adults, families, and communities and to inform policy development and programmatic responses. Wendy D. Manning and Susan L. Brown codirect the NCFMR at Bowling Green State University. This project is supported with assistance from Bowling Green State University. From 2007 to 2013, support was also provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.
Beyond "The Brady Bunch"
I-Fen Lin and Susan L. Brown mark National Stepfamily Day by discussing key findings on a recent study charting the terrain of the stepfamily landscape during older adulthood on OUPblog.
Check out our large collection of data resources...
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Many Older Adults Reside with Sibling or Roommate
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Huijing Wu, graduate research assistant, examines patterns of sibling co-residence and living with a roommate among adults aged 50-74. 1990 using ACS data. She found the most common marital status for older adults living with a sibling or roommate was never married (42%), followed by divorced (36%) and widowed (23%). In 2016, the proportion of divorced older adults (47%) eclipsed the never married (42%), with widowhood remaining the least common (11%).
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Huijing Wu finds people typically marry someone with similar characteristics
Comparing newlyweds in different-gender relationships, Huijing Wu, graduate research assistant, examines patterns of homogamy by education, race/ethnicity, age, and nativity status. This new Family Profile updates previous profiles examining sociodemographic homogamy in U.S. Marriages with data from the American Community Survey.
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Copyright ©2018 National Center for Family & Marriage Research. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: This project is supported with assistance from Bowling Green State University. From 2007 to 2013, support was also provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as representing the opinions or policy of any agency of the state or federal government.