Senior Thesis Presentations, Fall 2020

Welcome to the virtual version of the Literature Program's Senior Thesis Presentations! Below, you will find a video of Dr. Stephannie Gearhart's opening remarks, followed by videos of student presentations.

At BGSU, all undergraduates are required to engage in experiential learning in their major field. Experiential learning, broadly conceived, is a range of experiential activities that occur in and outside of the formal classroom setting. These activities can include community-based learning, public policy projects, undergraduate research, education abroad, practicums, internships, co-ops and clinicals, related to students’ majors and/or coursework. To fulfill this requirement in Literature and to celebrate the work of our students, we ask our majors to conduct literary scholarship in the form of a thesis and to present their work to an audience. Today you will have a chance to listen to our students speak about their signature work in the videos here.

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Opening Remarks: Dr. Stephannie Gearhart, Program Director (stephsg@bgsu.edu)

"Robert Burns: Inside and Outwith Scotland": Paisley M. DeFriece (paisled@bgsu.edu)

"References and Allusions to Moby Dick in Modern Media": Grace Ellis (gellis@bgsu.edu)

"Engaging With Mythological Adaptations": Amantha Garpiel (agarpie@bgsu.edu)

"The First Opium Epidemic: What We Can Learn from the Mistakes of the Past": Lauren Gregory (lauregg@bgsu.edu)

"As The Clock Turns: The Progressive Roots and Revisions of Nancy Drew": Noah Murdock (mrnoah@bgsu.edu)

"Cinderella in a Changing World: How a Tale of the Past Effects Today": Sophia Rechin (srechin@bgsu.edu)

'"I Am My Mom": Queering the Monomyth in Rebecca Sugar's Steven Universe': Matthew Taylor (matjtay@bgsu.edu)

"Visualizing Violence: How the Violence of the Civil Rights Movement is Depicted in Youth and YA Literature": Dyllan Wargo (wargod@bgsu.edu)

"Exactly How Queer are Vampires?": Sarah Webb (webbsa@bgsu.edu)

"The Inherent Queerness of the Conceptual Child as Revealed in Children's Literature": Nicholas Wynn (nawynn@bgsu.edu)

Opening Remarks: Dr. Stephannie Gearhart, Program Director

Paisley M. DeFriece: "Robert Burns: Inside and Outwith Scotland"

Grace Ellis: "References and Allusions to Moby Dick in Modern Media"

Amantha Garpiel: "Engaging With Mythological Adaptations"

Lauren Gregory: "The First Opium Epidemic: What We Can Learn from the Mistakes of the Past"

Noah Murdock: "As The Clock Turns: The Progressive Roots and Revisions of Nancy Drew"

Sophia Rechin: "Cinderella in a Changing World: How a Tale of the Past Effects Today"

Matthew Taylor: "I Am My Mom": Queering the Monomyth in Rebecca Sugar's Steven Universe

Dyllan Wargo: Visualizing Violence: How the Violence of the Civil Rights Movement is Depicted in Youth and YA Literature

Sarah Webb: "Exactly How Queer are Vampires?"

Nicholas Wynn: "The Inherent Queerness of the Conceptual Child as Revealed in Children's Literature"