Lisa Hanasono, Ph.D.

Lisa-Hanasono2018

Position: Associate Professor
Phone: 419-372-3512
Email: LisaKH@bgsu.edu
Address: 311 Kuhlin Center

Profile:

My research focuses on the ways that people communicate and cope with prejudice, discrimination, and stereotypes. I am particularly interested in (a) how people communicate their biases in online and offline contexts and (b) how supportive communication, institutional change, and community advocacy can address issues related to discrimination, stigma, and coping. Embracing synergies among research, teaching, and service, I also examine how innovative pedagogies, institutional transformation, and community interventions can reduce prejudice, stigma, and discrimination. My research has been published in journals, such as the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Communication Quarterly, Communication Teacher, Human Communication Research, and Sex Roles.

Education:

Ph.D. Communication, Purdue University
M.A. Communication, Miami University
B.A. Communication and Psychology, Miami University

Courses Taught:

Introduction to Communication Theory
Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication and Interviewing
Communication Research Methods
Persuasion
Health Communication
Relational Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Race and Communication
Communicating Asian American Identities

Select Representative Works:

Hanasono, L. K., Broido, E. M., Yacobucci, M. M., Root, K. V., Pena, S., & O’Neil, D. A. (2018). Secret service: Revealing gender biases in the visibility and value of faculty service. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education.Advance online publication. http://doi.org/10.1037/dhe0000081

Hanasono, L. K. (2018). A critical examination of communication textbooks. Communication Teacher, 32, 3-7http://doi.org/10.1080/17404622.2017.1372611

Hanasono, L. K., & Yang, F. (2016). Computer-mediated coping: Exploring the quality of supportive communication in an online discussion forum for individuals who are coping with racial discrimination. Communication Quarterly.64(4), 396-389. http://doi.org/10.1080/01463373.2015.1103292