CCS Course Offerings

2022 Fall CCS Undergraduate Courses

BG Perspective Guide:
BGP-HA= Humanities and Arts
BGP-HA+CD= Humanities and Arts AND Cultural Diversity in U.S.
BGP-HA+IP= Humanities and Arts AND International Perspectives
BGP-SBS= Social and Behavioral Sciences
BGP-SBS+CD=Social and Behavioral Sciences AND Cultural Diversity in U.S.
BGP-SBS+IP=Social and Behavioral Sciences AND International Perspectives
MDC=Multidisciplinary Component

Course Description:
Introduction to theories of culture, race, and gender and the relations among them. Open to ACS, ETHN, POPC, and WS majors and minors or by permission of instructor.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
CCS 3030/1001/71828 Rob Sloane TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm

Course Description:
Introduces students to modes of qualitative research commonly used in the fields of American culture studies, ethnic studies, popular culture, and women's studies. Focus on data gathering processes as well as data analysis. Open to ACS, ETHN, POPC, and WS majors and minors or by permission of instructor. Junior status required.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
CCS 4850/1001/71829 Rebecca Kinney
TuTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Course Description:
Regional, ethnic and economic aspects of American national experience as reflected in verbal, visual and material artifacts. Culture theory and models used to examine selected topics and problems. Required of all American culture studies majors.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ACS 2000/1100/72039 Rob Sloane MW 10:30am-11:20am
ACS 2000/1101/72040 Shelby Kuney  MW 10:30am-11:20am
ACS 2000/1102/72046 Tina Nandi Friday 10:30am-11:20am
ACS 2000/1103/70678   Friday 10:30am-11:20am
ACS 2000/1104/70684 Shelby Kuney Friday 12:30pm-1:20pm
ACS 2000/1105/70694 Tina Nandi Friday 12:30pm-1:20pm
ACS 2000/1106/70696   Friday 12:30pm-1:20pm

Course Description:
Interdisciplinary exploration of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation in the United States, emphasizing imaginative expressive forms, such as fiction, poetry, film and the visual arts.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ACS 2500/1001/73863   MWF 8:30am-9:30am
ACS 2500/1002/70702 Phillips
MWF 9:30am-10:20am
ACS 2500/1003/70704 Shipley Tues./Thurs. 9:30am-10:45am
ACS 2500/1004/71645 Freimuth MW 4:30-5:45pm
ACS 2500/1005/71466 Neff-Strickland MWF 11:30-12:20pm
ACS 2500/1006/72420 Thomason Tues./Thurs. 6:00-7:15pm
ACS 2500/107W/73913 Kindelt Online
ACS 2500/108W/73439   Online
ACS 2500/7E1 ECAM/DIST 410W/73989   Online

Course Description:
The course gives an examination into four of rock music's most prominent subcultures including rap, reggae, punk and heavy metal music.  This course gives a historical breakdown of these four genres and examines their cultural impact on popular music, popular culture and humanity. A series of films, 
music/sound recordings, websites and other media related to the genres will be analyzed from a historical and cultural point of view.
Combined with POPC 3800/1001/72434

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ACS 3000/1001/71824 Matt Donahue
Tu 6:00pm-9:00pm

Coure Descripion:
This course is an introduction to the study of the comic books, graphic novels, and sequential art and storytelling in American popular culture.  It shall introduce students to some of the major topics, themes, creators, characters, and issues that have led to the creation of and continued success of the superhero genre.  We shall explore the role of heroism in our society and concepts dealing with race, ethnicity, gender, politics, and more as they are presented within the superhero context.  This class will rely on a mixture of lecture and discussion of the material we are reading.  Students are encouraged to actively participate in our discussion and analysis.  The emphasis of the course will be to get students to think critically about the issues that are raised in the readings and class discussions.  We shall consider why this genre, which was once viewed merely as juvenile, disposable “literature,” has had such a profound impact upon our popular culture.
Combined course with POPC 3700/1001/77246

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ACS 3000/1002/75969 Chuck Coletta TuTh 7:30pm-8:45pm

Coure Description:
This course surveys the American experience with drugs and alcohol, from the colonial era to the present. Topics include: colonial drinking, origins or opiate and cocaine addiction, drug control and regulation, Prohibition, LSD and the 1960s, and the War on Drugs. Approved for distance education.
Combined with HIST 3365/1001/76931

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ACS 3000/1003/76816 Scott Martin TuTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

Course Description:
This gateway course to the field of Ethnic Studies introduces students to interdisciplinary analyses of race and ethnicity in the U.S. It explores the social construction and ideologies of race in colonial conquest, slavery, and immigration, and the intersections of race with other hierarchies such as class, gender, and sexuality. Approved for Distance Education. Students cannot take ETHN 1010 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Ethnic Studies."

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 1010/1001-2/70738/70739 Stokely MWF 12:30-1:20pm
ETHN 1010/1003-4/70740/70741 Kivari MWF 2:30-3:20pm
ETHN 1010/1005-06/70742/72157   MW 4:30-5:45
ETHN 1010/1007-08/72156/70743 Ayala Tues./Thurs. 8:00am-9:15am
ETHN 1010/1009-10/73766/73767 Rahman Tues./Thurs. 6:00-7:15pm
ETHN 1010/1011-12/73773/73774 Moreno MWF 3:30-4:20pm
ETHN 1010/1013-14/72512/73768 Moreno MWF 11:30-12:20pm
ETHN 1010/1015-16/73368/73769 Bhalla Tues./Thurs. 1:00-2:15pm
ETHN 1010/1100-1101/73775 Stendebach MWF 9:30-10:20am
ETHN 1010 DIST/ECAM/7E2 421W/422W/75271/75772   Online

Course Description:
Latina/o experience in the United States: cultures, life experiences, and the limited political, education, socio-economic opportunities of this minority. Students cannot take ETHN 1100 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Latina/o Studies."

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 1100/1001/70675 Luis Moreno MWF 10:20am-11:20am

Course Description:
An introduction to the history of black studies, tracing it from its origins in the social, cultural, and political struggles for human and civil rights to the various intellectual currents which have defined the field as a discipline. It places special emphasis on the United States but also considers key authors, historical figures, and social movements from the black Diaspora. Students cannot take ETHN 1200 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to African American Studies."

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 1200/1001/70706 Edge MWF 10:30am-11:20am
ETHN 1200/1002/70718 Edge MWF 11:30-12:20pm
ETHN 1200/1003/76881   MWF 9:20am-10:20am

Course Description:
Similarities and differences of the various components of the Asian American category with reference to their individual histories and collective situation from the 19th century to the present. Students cannot take ETHN 1300 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topics "Introduction to Asian American Studies."

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 1300/1001/70721 Vibha Bhalla TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm

Course Description:
An interdisciplinary examination of the Native American Diaspora in the context of European discovery and conquest. A general overview and comparative analysis of the diverse native people and cultures of North America, effects of colonialism and U.S. policy on Native American communities, federal Indian law and policy, and cultural negotiation. Students cannot take ETHN 1600 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Native American Studies."

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 1600/1001/70725 Michelle Stokely TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm
ETHN 1600/1002/72338 Michelle Stokely TuTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Course Description:
Special ethnic topics of interest to students provided as a part of regular offering. May be repeated. Approved for distance education.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3000/1001/76887 Michelle Stokely MWF 2:30pm-3:20pm

Course Description:
Sports has long played an important role in American identity, often serving as a metaphor for larger social, economic, and political issues. This class explores the relationship between race and sports, using sports to analyze changes in racial attitudes and actions over time. The main focus will be on American sports, but some topics will bring an international approach. Major themes will include the complex relationship between sports, race, and American identity; efforts to segregate/integrate sporting activities; the perceptions of specific racial and ethnic groups through sports; intersections of race, nationality, gender, and sexuality among athletes; and sports as a symbolic battleground for larger political issues of racism.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3000/1002/76889 Thomas Edge
MWF 1:30pm-2:20pm

Course Description:
ETHN 3000 Beaches and Islands interrogates these images in the context of native/indigenous realities of conquest, predatory tourism, globalization, militarism, and deculturation. Focusing on Hawai’i and other Pacific Islands and the Caribbean, this course invites one to juxtapose one’s fantasies of island “paradises” with indigenous/native realities of their homelands.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3000/1003/76890 Sridevi Menon Tue/Thurs. 1:00pm-2:15pm

Course Description:
This course offers a focused examination of racial, ethnic, and gendered representations as they have appeared within the context of popular culture and mainstream media in the United States. It critically investigates the history of a wide range of stereotypes within the context of theatre, film, music, television, and radio, analyzing the social and ideological processes and practices that have given them such widespread currency since the nation's founding.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3030/1001/76891 Jess Birch Tues/Thurs 1:00pm-2:15pm

Course Description:
This course explores how race, gender, class, sexuality, and religion intersect and converge in shaping the lives of women of color in the United States. It emphasizes the diversity of experience of women of color as they resist and contest the material and cultural constraints that limit them. The course also focuses on women of color as agents of social and political change, and provides perspectives on the ways in which women of color shape and define American institutions and society.
Combined course with WS3050/1001/71122 and WS 3050/1002/71965

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3050/1001/70735 Jess Birch
MW 4:30pm-5:45pm
ETHN 3050/1002/71978 Jess Birch MW 6:00pm-7:15pm

Course Description:
Mexican American culture in the U.S. Topics include family structure and roles, religion, education, and immigration, among other topics.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3120/1001/75007 Luis Moreno MWF 1:30pm-2:20pm

Course Description:
An exploration of women's lives and experiences in global/local contexts. Emphasis on analytical and methodological frameworks to examine different histories, activism, borders, and ideologies shaping women's lives. Focus on Third World Critiques of Western feminism in relation to social, economic, and political structures of race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender and class. Prerequisite: Any ETHN 1000-level course, ETHN 2010, ETHN 3050 or any WS course. Credit allowed only for ETHN 3130 or WS 3130. Approved for Distance Education.
Combined course with WS3130/1001/77021

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3130/1001/76983 Sridevi Menon Tues/Thurs 11:30pm-12:45pm

Course Description:
This is an introductory course on Africa from the earliest times through the colonial and modern eras. Themes include origins, myths and stereotypes, artistic expressions and cultural values, socio-political and economic development, colonial experience and contemporary conditions. Credit allowed only for one of HIST 3173, ETHN 3173.
Combined course with HIST 3173/1001/76929

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 3173/1001/77074 Apollos Nwauwa Tues/Thurs 11:30pm-12:45pm

Course Description:
The historical, structural, political, and everyday basis of ethnic difference and racial/ethnic conflict; focused case-study approach to comparing different systems of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., the Americas, or globally. Prerequisite: junior or senior status, or consent of instructor.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 4300/1001/75739 Sridevi Menon Tues/Thurs 2:30pm-3:45pm

Course Description:
This course surveys the invention of the concept of "race" and its role in the development of America. It examines both the history of "scientific" and popular thinking about race and racial differences as well as how such beliefs influenced the history of the United States.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
ETHN 4500/1001/76984 Thomas Edge   MW 4:30pm-5:45pm

Course Description:
Basic theories and approaches to the scholarly study of popular culture, including various media, folklore, and everyday life.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 1600/1100/71597 Brown MW 1:30pm-2:20pm
POPC 1600/1101/71598 Alva Friday 1:30pm-2:20pm
POPC 1600/1102/71599 Hyden Friday 1:30pm-2:20pm
POPC 1600/1103/71600 Miller Friday 1:30pm-2:20pm
POPC 1600/1104/73816
Alva Friday 2:30pm-3:20pm
POPC 1600/1105/71601 Hyden Friday 2:30pm-3:20pm
POPC 1600/1106/71602 Miller Friday 2:30pm-3:20pm
POPC 1600/1107/71633 Forquer Friday 9:30am-10:20am
POPC 1600/1108/72707 Minniear Friday 9:30am-10:20am
POPC 1600/1109/72718 Minniear Friday 8:30am-9:20am
POPC 1600/1110/72719 Forquer Friday 8:30am-9:20am
POPC 1600/1111/73818   Friday 2:30pm-3:20pm
POPC 1600/1112/72720   Friday 1:30pm-2:20pm
POPC 1600/1001/1002/72158/72159 Mecchi Tue./Thurs. 9:30am-10:45am
POPC 1600/1103/1004/71592/71593 Sule Tue./Thurs. 11:30am-12:45pm
POPC 1600/1005/1006/72103/72104 Bowles MWF 12:30pm-1:20pm
POPC 1600/1007/1008/70290/70291 Baynard MWF 10:30am-11:20am
POPC 1600/1009/1010/72105/72106 Cote MWF 8:30am-9:20am

Course Description:
Some of the ways in which mass media (TV, film, recording industry, print, radio) have affected modern American culture. Media relationships and interactions.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 1650/1001/1002/71737/71738 Coletta MW 6:00pm-7:15pm
POPC 1650/1003/1004/71585/71744 Coletta MW 7:00pm-8:45pm
POPC 1650/1005/1006/72503/72504 Knoell MWF 2:30pm-3:20pm
POPC 1650/107W/108W/71584/71743 Donahue Online
POPC 1650/7E1 409W/410W/71739/71745 Donahue Online

Course Description:
Basic theories of approaches to 20th century and 21st century African-American popular culture. Trace ways black popular culture has shaped and is shaped by national and global contexts. Examine relationship of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class. Provide an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the significance of black popular culture in contemporary U.S. and global societies. Approved for distance education.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 1700/7E1 401W/74971 Cornelius Fortune Online

Course Description:
Study and collecting of folklore; ballads, myths, tall tales, heroes, folk medicines, superstitions, proverbs and crafts.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 2200/101W/71970 Staff Online
POPC 2200/1002/71740 Montana Miller Tues/Thurs 1:00pm-2:15pm

Course Description:
Study of theme, era or issue in popular culture. Subject matter designated in class schedule. May be repeated once if topics differ. Approved for distance education.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 2310/101W/72684 Montana Miller Online

Course Description:
Popular film as mass entertainment medium; Hollywood studios, popular film formulae, genres, relationships between popular films and movie-going audience; viewing of appropriate films. Extra fee.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 2500/1001/73828 Tiffany Knoell   MW 6:00pm-7:15pm
POPC 2500/1002/73830 Tiffany Knoell MW 7:30pm-8:45pm

Course Description:
Relationship between music world and listening-viewing audience; musical styles, trends in popular music, popular performers and entertainers and what they reveal about popular culture; appropriate music listening. Approved for Distance Education.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 2800/1001/72259 Matthew Donahue Tues/Thurs 2:30pm-3:45pm

Course Description:
Relationship between popular television programming and American society; viewing of appropriate television.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 2900/1001/77177 Charles Coletta Tues/Thurs 6:00pm-7:15pm

Course Description:
Study and analysis of nonverbal folklife; theory and methods of analysis of such forms of expressive folk culture as arts, crafts, architecture, foodways, festivals, customs and folk rituals; emphasis on modes of description and analysis commonly used by folklorists to understand and explain such materials.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 3210/1001/76993 Montana Miller   MW 4:30pm-5:45pm

Course Description:
In-depth study of particular aspect of popular film. Topics may focus on a single genre, director, historical period, or studio. Appropriate films will be viewed. May be repeated three times if topics differ. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Extra fee.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 3500/1001/76995 Tiffany Knoell MWF 3:30pm-4:30pm

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the study of the comic books, graphic novels, and sequential art and storytelling in American popular culture.  It shall introduce students to some of the major topics, themes, creators, characters, and issues that have led to the creation of and continued success of the superhero genre.  We shall explore the role of heroism in our society and concepts dealing with race, ethnicity, gender, politics, and more as they are presented within the superhero context.  This class will rely on a mixture of lecture and discussion of the material we are reading.  Students are encouraged to actively participate in our discussion and analysis.  The emphasis of the course will be to get students to think critically about the issues that are raised in the readings and class discussions.  We shall consider why this genre, which was once viewed merely as juvenile, disposable “literature,” has had such a profound impact upon our popular culture.
Combined with ACS 3000/1001/71824

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 3700/1001/72246 Charles Coletta Tues/Thurs 7:30pm-8:45pm

Course Description:
The course gives an examination into four of rock music's most prominent subcultures including rap, reggae, punk and heavy metal music.  This course gives a historical breakdown of these four genres and examines their cultural impact on popular music, popular culture and humanity. A series of films, music/sound recordings, websites and other media related to the genres will be analyzed from a historical and cultural point of view.
Combined with ACS3000/1001/71824

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 3800/1001/72434 Matthew Donahue Tues. 6:00pm-9:00pm

Course Description:
This course will teach students about the most common ways that violence is represented in narratives of detection, and how these representations (as well as the realities of crime) are shaped by inequalities of race, class, gender, and sexuality.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
POPC 4600/101W/73337 Becca Cragin Online

Course Description:
Interdisciplinary survey of the new scholarship on women. Emphasis on the interconnectedness of gender, class and ethnicity in women's experiences and viewpoints. Approved for distance education.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 2000/1100/75958 Rainey-Smithback MW 11:30am-12:20pm
WS 2000/1101/75959 Clemens-Smucker Friday 11:30am-12:20pm
WS 2000/1102/75960 Cline Friday 9:30am-10:20am
WS 2000/1103/75961 Cline Friday 11:30am-12:20pm
WS 2000/1104/75962 Ola Friday 9:30am-10:20am
WS 2000/1105/75963 Ola Friday 11:30am-12:20pm
WS 2000/1106/75964   Friday 9:30am-10:20am
WS 2000/1107/75965   Friday 11:30am-12:20pm
WS 2000/1108/75966 Clemens-Smucker Friday 10:30am-11:20am
WS 2000H Rainey-Smithback Friday 10:30am-11:20am
WS 2000/1001-2/71357/72310 Calow Tues./Thurs. 4:00pm-5:15pm
WS 2000/1003-4/72290/72311 Bonham Tues./Thurs. 1:00-2:15pm
WS 2000/1005-6/72291/72312   MWF 10:30am-11:20am
WS 2000/107W-108W/72292/72313 Iscan Online
WS 2000/DIST/109W/110W/72293/72314 Zongo Online
WS 2000/DIST/ECAM 7E2 411W/412W/73728/73729   Online

Course Description:
Exploration of a range of topics and issues emerging in the interdisciplinary area of LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender/Transexual) Studies.  Course engages in cultural and textual analysis as well as consideration of specific components of LGBT Studies, including (1) major concepts and theories, (2) political, economic, and social constructs which institutionalize homophobia and heterosexism, (3) diversity issues within LGBT communities, and (4) the impact of LGBT scholarship on specific academic disciplines.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 2610/1001/71718 Julie Haught MWF 9:30am-10:20am

Course Description:
Historical survey of feminist theorists who have challenged and advocated changes in traditional ways of thinking about women's diverse social, sexual, racial, theological, class-specific status in society. Prerequisite: WS 2000 or permission of instructor.  Approved for Distance Education.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 2730/101W/71120 Julie Haught Online

Course Description:
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies focuses on how gender interacts with other forms of difference, including race, ethnicity, dis/ability, class, age, and sexual orientation. This course is an interdisciplinary survey on masculinities that begins with the premise that masculinities are socially constructed and culturally situated, and asks, “What does it mean to be an American man?” In addition to scholarship on masculinities past and present, we will also analyze the presentation of American manhood(s) in popular culture, exploring how hegemonic masculinities reproduce hierarchies and considering how subordinate masculinities can contest the status quo.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 3000/1001/74522 Jess Birch Tues/Thurs 2:30pm-3:45pm

Course Description:
This course explores how race, gender, class, sexuality, and religion intersect and converge in shaping the lives of women of color in the United States. It emphasizes the diversity of experience of women of color as they resist and contest the material and cultural constraints that limit them. The course also focuses on women of color as agents of social and political change, and provides perspectives on the ways in which women of color shape and define American institutions and society. Credit allowed only for one of ETHN 3050 or WS 3050.
Combined with ETHN 3050/1001/70735 and ETHN 3050/1002/71978

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 3050/1001/71122 Jess Birch
MW 4:30pm-5:45pm
WS 3050/1002/71965 Jess Birch
MW 6:00pm-7:15pm

Course Description:
An exploration of women's lives and experiences in global/local contexts. Emphasis on analytical and methodological frameworks to examine different histories, activism, borders, and ideologies shaping women's lives. Focus on Third World critiques of Western feminisms in relation to social, economic, and political structures of race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and class. Prerequisite: Any WS course, any ETHN 1000-level course, ETHN 2010, or ETHN 3050. Credit allowed only for ETHN 3130 or WS 3130. Approved for distance education.
Combined course with ETHN 3130/1001/76983

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 3130/1001/77022 Sridevi Menon Tues/Thurs 11:30am-12:45pm

Course Description:
An interdisciplinary examination of violence against women, including etiology and intervention, in the US and globally. Feminist and cultural perspectives will be used to interpret the research on interpersonal violence.

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 3350/1001/74955 Staff Tues/Thurs 4:00pm-5:15pm

Course Description:
Theory and research on gender in contemporary U.S. society and beyond. Evaluation of social construction of masculinity, femininity, and gender identity as well as gender as a structure in major social institutions including families, peers and schools, work and occupations, politics, violence, health/illness, sexuality, and the media. Emphasis on how experiences of gender differ by social class, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and age. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or WS 2000. Credit only allowed for one of SOC 4600 or WS 4600. Approved for distance education.
Combined course with SOC4600/1001/76898

Class/Section/Call Number Instructor 
Day and Time
WS 4600/1001/1002/77022/77123 Laura Sanchez
Tues/Thurs 11:30am-12:45pm

Updated: 05/26/2022 11:10AM