Asian Studies Program


In the age of global economy and digital communication, Pacific Rim nations have become America’s close partners in multinational business, diplomacy and cultural exchange. The most populated region of the world, Asia has developed some of the fastest and most productive economies. A growing demand exists for Americans to become familiar Asian business, journalism, government, education, information technology and service.

BGSU is one of few Ohio universities to offer a bachelor’s degree in Asian Studies. Students gain a broad knowledge of the culture and societies of East Asia, South Asia and Southeast Asia; an in-depth knowledge of one of the East Asian countries (Japan, China, and Korea; and basic conversational and reading skills of an Asian language.

The week of October 16-20, 2017, Bowling Green State University's Asian Studies Program and Peace and Conflict Studies will be sponsoring a Peace Symposium along with The Japan Foundation. You won't want to miss this opportunity! See the Abstract below for more details. Schedule of events can be found here.

Seeking Peace in This Nuclear Era

At the end of the cold war, the constant threat of nuclear annihilation seemed to be over.  Today, though stockpiles have been reduced, the weapons are still with us. In recent years, new political and military conflicts, especially between western democracies and North Korea and Russia, have revived the specter of nuclear war. Yet the U.S. public, especially young people, are generally unaware of the issues, the nature of nuclear war, the history of Hiroshima, and effective ways to achieve peace.

During the week of October 16, BGSU will host four engaging and important speakers who will provide insights on the dangers of nuclear war and threats to peace facing the world today.

Dr. Thomas Snitch will give the Nakamoto Peace Lecture on Monday October 16.  He will tell the story, based on declassified intelligence, diplomatic history, political intrigue, technology diversions, skullduggery, and his trips to North Korea, about how Pyongyang was able to successfully build, test and now, possibly deploy a thermonuclear warhead on an intercontinental ballistic missile.  Snitch joined the US Department of State and the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in 1981 and, after completing post-doctoral work in reactor physics and nuclear warhead design at Los Alamos National Labs, was named the first US National Nuclear Officer for North Korea (and South Africa).  He was one of the first people in the world to discover that North Korea was actively pursuing a nuclear weapons capability.

Dr. Gwynne Dyer, a renowned journalist, military historian, author, and filmmaker, will provide an overview and analysis of an array of current threats to peace, with a focus on nuclear issues and North Korea.  His October 17 lecture, tentatively titled “Don’t Panic,” will explain how people and governments can effectively deal with threats from North Korea, ISIS, the rise of populism, and climate change.

The heart of the symposium will be provided by two Japanese survivors of the Hiroshima bomb, Ms. Keiko Ogura and Ms. Setsuko Thurlow, who will discuss both their individual stories and their perspectives on promoting peace, both at a public lecture to the university on October 18 and at the Wood County Library on Oct 19. Ms. Ogura is a founder of Hiroshima Interpreters for Peace and is a lifelong advocate for peace and against nuclear weapons.  Ms. Thurlow is also a lifelong opponent of nuclear war.  She was given a Distinguished Peace Leadership award in 2015 by the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.  In 2016, she was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. This past year she was working with countries at the UN in support of the recent Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEATURED

Careers in Asian Studies

Careers in Asian Studies

Opportunities exist in academia, business, government and the nonprofit sector for Asian Studies graduates. Read More

NEWS AND STORIES

Akiko Jones Honored by Japanese Foreign Minister

Akiko Jones Honored by Japanese Foreign Minister

Akiko Kawano Jones, director of BGSU’s Asian Studies program, received the Japanese Foreign Minister's Commendation. Mitsuhiro Wada, Consul General of Japan, presented the award from Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida in recognition of Jones’ "outstanding efforts toward mutual understanding between Japan and the United States, with distinguished achievements which have contributed to Japan's friendship and goodwill with other countries." Read More

Alumna Credits Japanese Studies for Career Success

Alumna Credits Japanese Studies for Career Success

As an undergraduate majoring in International Business in the late ’80s, Sheila Spradlin Reich planned to take Japanese only long enough to fulfill a humanities requirement and to speak just enough of the language to be employable upon graduation. “I ended up taking Japanese all the way through my junior year,” she said. “Not only did I learn the language, my eyes were also opened to a whole new culture and society.” Read More

Asian Studies Class Returns to Hiroshima

Asian Studies Class Returns to Hiroshima

Every two years since 2006, students in “Hiroshima and Beyond” (Asian Studies 3100) travel to Japan to observe the anniversary of the WWII atomic bomb attack and to immerse themselves in Japanese culture. The program is offered through a partnership with Hiroshima Jogakuin University, which provides lecturers and experts during the experience and places students with host families during their visit. Read More