NCFMR

The National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR) was established in 2007 to improve our understanding of how family structure is linked to the health and well-being of children, adults, families, and communities and to inform policy development and programmatic responses. Wendy D. Manning and Susan L. Brown codirect the NCFMR at Bowling Green State University. This project is supported with assistance from Bowling Green State University. From 2007 to 2013, support was also provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.
Karen Guzzo discusses decline in birth rate with LiveScience
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Part of the reason for the decline in U.S. birth rates may be that people are in a general state of economic uncertainty. Even though the Great Recession technically ended in 2009, people may still feel uneasy about their economic situation; they may be employed but working part time, or going to school and working, or trying to pay off student loans, Guzzo said.
"People feel just really uncertain about the future," Guzzo told Live Science. "And that generally does not bode well for having kids."
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Living Apart Together (LAT): A new option for older adults

Researchers are beginning to focus on these concerns, said Susan Brown, NCFMR co-director. “It’s really remarkable that older adults are in the vanguard of family change."

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Having an older mom can be better for kids

Karen Guzzo discusses the advantages of waiting to have children with the Atlantic.

These kids are more likely to be born into stable, long-term relationships to parents who are more financially secure than they were in their 20s and 30s.
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Birth Rates for Women 40+, 1960-2016
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PAA President Wendy Manning

Copyright ©2018 National Center for Family & Marriage Research. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: This project is supported with assistance from Bowling Green State University. From 2007 to 2013, support was also provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as representing the opinions or policy of any agency of the state or federal government.