Maggie Brooks, Ph.D

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Maggie Brooks, Ph.D.

  • Position: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 419-372-9389
  • Email: mbrooks@bgsu.edu
  • Address: 358H Maurer Center

Dr. Maggie Brooks is an Associate Professor of Management, dual appointed to Industrial Organizational Psychology. Her research interests include judgment and decision making, employee recruitment and selection, and diversity and discrimination in the workplace. Her work has been published in academic journals including Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, and Journal of Management. Maggie teaches in areas such as human resource management, judgment and decision making, organizational behavior, and research methods. She chairs student theses and dissertations in the Industrial Organizational Psychology PhD program and the Executive Doctorate of Organizational Change and Development program, with student placements at organizations including Ford Motor Company, HumRRO (Human Resources Research Organization), PDRI (Personnel Decisions Research Institutes), and Proctor & Gamble. She is a member of the Academy of Management, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Society for Judgment and Decision Making.

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Bowling Green State University, 2004
M.A., Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Bowling Green State University, 2001
B.A., Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, Summa Cum Laude, with University Honors, 1999

ACADEMIC POSITIONS

Associate Professor, Bowling Green State University, August, 2006-present
Assistant Professor, Bowling Green State University, August, 2006 – 2012
Assistant Professor, Wayne State University, August, 2004 – May, 2006
Instructor, Bowling Green State University, August, 2001 – May, 2004
Teaching Assistant, Bowling Green State University, June, 2000 – May, 2001
Teaching Assistant, University of Wisconsin — Eau Claire, January, 1997 – May, 1999

  • judgment and decision making at work
  • employee selection
  • corporate reputation
  • bias and discrimination at work
  • work experiences of marginalized populations
  • communicating validity information to nonscientists
  • survey development

Wang, Y., Highhouse, S., &  Brooks, M. E. (2022). Culture versus other sources of variance in risk and benefit perceptions: A comparison of Japan and the United States. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. https://doi.org/10.1002/bdm.2277

Childers, M., Highhouse, S., & Brooks, M. E. (2021). Apples, oranges, and ironing boards: Comparative effect sizes influence lay impressions of test validity. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12367

Highhouse, S., & Brooks, M. E. (2021). A simple solution to a complex problem: Manipulate the mediator! Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 14(4), 493-496. https://doi.org/10.1017/iop.2021.117

Zhang, D., Highhouse, S., Brooks, M. E., & Zhang, Y. (2018). Communicating effect sizes with graphical visual aids. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12220

O’Neil, D. A., Brooks, M. E., & Hopkins, M. M. (2018). Women’s roles in women’s career advancement: What do women expect of each other? Career Development International, 23(3), 327-344. https://doi.org/10.1108/CDI-10-2017-0196

Highhouse, S., Brooks, M.E., Nesnidol, S., & Sim, S. (2017). Is a .51 validity coefficient good? Value sensitivity for interview validity. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 25, 383-389. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12192

Updated: 12/09/2022 10:52AM