Albert Dzur, Ph.D.

Albert-Dzur-1

ALBERT W. DZUR, PH.D.

Position: PROFESSOR
Phone: 419-372-7270
Email: awdzur@bgsu.edu
Address: 111 Williams Hall

             View Albert W. Dzur's CV               

AFFILIATIONS

  • Professor of Political Science, with a joint appointment in Philosophy, Bowling Green State University
  • Research Fellow, Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Associate, Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance, Canberra University, Australia

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Albert W. Dzur's work in democratic theory focuses on the value of citizen participation in professionalized domains that impact public affairs. He is interested in how collaboration bridges the distance between professionals and communities, encourages mutual trust, develops skills, and builds networks. His concept of "democratic professionalism" identifies the ways sharing previously professionalized tasks can enable citizen engagement in major social issues like crime and punishment. He is the author of Democratic Professionalism: Citizen Participation and the Reconstruction of Professional Ethics, Identity, and Practice (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008), Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury (Oxford University Press, 2012), and co-editor of Democratic Theory and Mass Incarceration (Oxford University Press, 2016). He serves on the editorial boards of Howard Journal of Crime and Justice and Restorative Justice: an International Journal. He also writes regularly for the Boston Review.

Fields of Study

Political theory, with an emphasis on democratic theory. Particular interest in citizen participation and power-sharing inside professionalized institutions in criminal justice, public administration, education, health care, and mass media.

Education

  • M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • B.A. from the University of California, Santa Barbara

Selected Publications

Recent Chapters and Articles:

  • “Punishment and Democratic Theory: Resources for a Better Penal Politics.” (with Ian Loader and Richard Sparks) In Democratic Theory and Mass Incarceration, eds. Albert W. Dzur, Ian Loader, and Richard Sparks. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, 1-17.
  • “Participatory Innovation in Criminal Justice: Why, How, and How Far?” In Justice and Penal Reform: Re-shaping the Penal Landscape, eds. Stephen Farrall, Barry Goldson, Ian Loader, and Anita Dockley. London: Routledge, 2016, 180-197.
  • “Public Restorative Justice: The Participatory Democratic Dimensions of Institutional Reform.” Raisons Politiques (3) (Special Issue on Restorative Justice, 2015): 51-71.
  • “The Democratic Roots of Academic Professionalism: Power and Freedom in Co-creation.” In Democracy’s Education: Public Work, Citizenship, and the Future of Colleges and Universities, ed. Harry C. Boyte. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 2014, 53-61.
  • “Repellent Institutions and the Absentee Public: Catalyzing Responsibility for Punishment.” In Popular Punishment: On the Normative Significance of Public Opinion for Penal Theory, eds. Jesper Ryberg and Julian Roberts. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014, 204-227.

Books:

  • Democratic Theory and Mass Incarceration. (Edited, with Ian Loader and Richard Sparks) New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. 
  • Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012.
  • Democratic Professionalism: Citizen Participation and the Reconstruction of Professional Ethics, Identity, and Practice.  University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2008.

Courses Taught

  • American Political Thought
  • Democracy and the Citizen (Service/Engagement Class)
  • Modern Political Ideologies
  • Social and Political Philosophy  
  • Western Political Thought 
  • Classical Political Thought
  • Democratic Political Theory
  • History of Political Philosophy
  • Public Administration Ethics
  • Distinguished Faculty Lecture, College of Arts and Sciences, Bowling Green State University, 2013
  • Neil MacCormick Fellowship, University of Edinburgh Law School, 2009
  • Scholar in Residence Fellowship Award, Institute for the Study of Culture and Society, Bowling Green State University, 2005
  • Best Paper Award, Foundations of Political Theory, American Political Science Association, 1999    
  • 2016-18  “Research on Public Engagement Professionals.” Kettering Foundation.
  • 2015-2017  “Re-imagining Professionalism: Towards Co-Production” (with Pamela Fisher, PI, et al.). Economic and Social Research Council (UK).
  • 2014-15  “Public Restorative Justice.” Porticus of North America Foundation.
  • 2015. “Innovating in the Mainstream? Enhancing Public Deliberation in Conventional Participatory Spaces” (with Carolyn Hendriks).  Australian Political Science Association annual meetings, Canberra; and European Consortium of Political Research general conference, Montreal.
  • 2015. “Democratic Schools: Participatory Innovation in K-12 Education.” European Consortium of Political Research general conference, Montreal.
  • 2015. “Democratic Innovation in Criminal Justice: Why, How, and How Far?” Association for Social and Political Philosophy, University of Amsterdam.
  • 2016. Roundtable panelist, “Democratizing Criminal Justice: De-Bureaucratization.” Democratizing Criminal Justice conference, Northwestern University Law School.
  • 2016. “Democracy Inside: Participatory Innovation in Unlikely Places.”  Keynote presentation, ESRC Seminar: Re-imagining Professionalism in Mental Health: Towards Co-production, University of Leeds, England.
  • 2015. “Lay Participation in Criminal Justice: Barriers, Reform, and Normative Reasons for Change.” Keynote presentation, Law and Society in the 21st century conference, University of Oslo, Norway. 
  • Democracy Inside: Participatory Innovation in Unlikely Places: a book manuscript on barriers and opportunities for professionals interested in increasing lay citizen participation and power-sharing in education, criminal justice, and public administration.
  • Democracy and Criminal Justice: Lay Participation in Conflict Mediation: a multi-year collaboration with a research team at University of Oslo studying how the institutional commitment to lay participation was developed and is sustained in Norway’s national conflict-mediation service.
  • Re-imagining Professionalism in Mental Health: Towards Co-production: a multi-year seminar series at Leeds and Oxford funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (UK) to encourage greater lay participation and integrate the model of democratic professionalism in the mental health field.