Interactional Aphasiology Lab

Interactional-Aphasiology-Lab-LOGO

The Interactional Aphasiology Lab is part of the Communication and Disorders Department at Bowling Green State University. Our research focuses on people and families living with aphasia (a communication disorder) and dysphagia (a swallowing disorder). Both aphasia and dysphagia are caused by brain damage, most often resulting from a stroke. We are interested in understanding aphasia as a multi-faceted disorder that impacts many life domains. Some of the areas that we currently focus on include how aphasia effects interaction in dyads as well as in groups, how the speech difficulties people with aphasia experience can influence their understandability and how to make public spaces more accessible to people living with communication impairments.

Our lab is located on the first floor of the Health and Human Services building on the Bowling Green Campus, room 185. Dr. Archer’s office is 250, located on the second floor. Our research team includes undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students, as well as collaborators within the department, across campus, and at other institutions.


brent_archer

Brent E. Archer

Position: Principal Investigator
Email: barcher@bgsu.edu

Dr. Archer is an Assistant Professor at Bowling Green State University in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and the principal investigator of the Interactional Aphasiology Lab. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in introduction to communication disorders, aphasia, and dysphagia.

Doctoral Students

Nora Gulick is a second year master’s student in the doctoral-bridge program. Her thesis is examining the unique functions of conversational moves used in conversation-based group therapy for people with aphasia.

Graduate Students

Kristi Crumrine is a second year master’s student whose thesis is qualitatively investigating if speech-language pathologists working in palliative care settings feel as though they were properly prepared by their university curriculums to work with that population.

Makayla Morgan is a second year master’s student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her thesis is investigating the influence on accessibility for persons with aphasia before and after providing Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) training to volunteer docents at a local art museum.

Undergraduate Students

Natalie Zitko is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Stephanie Koch is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student studying Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is a CURS research scholarship recipient and is currently involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Madison Duling is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is a CURS research scholarship recipient and is involved with transcribing and coding group conversations of persons with aphasia, as well as gathering interactional data from the DaZy aphasia program for future research.

Lily Schwind is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Allison Veskauf is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Rachel Anthony is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Anna-Marie Sulminski is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate honors student majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She received a CURS research grant to complete a study, which investigated the types of errors made by people with fluent aphasia in different speaking situations. Her honors project examines how facilitators in conversation groups for people with aphasia use writing to support communication.

Alexander Loree is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. He is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Katie Hartsel is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is a CURS research scholarship recipient and is involved with transcribing and coding group conversations of persons with aphasia, as well as gathering interactional data from the DaZy aphasia program for future research.

Brianna Goodwin is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.

Connor Messer-Kruse is an undergraduate research assistant and current undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. He is involved with transcribing and coding video footage of persons with aphasia engaged in facilitated conversation at aphasia centers.


Previous Research Assistants

Undergraduate Students (2018-2019)

  • Tarynn Clune
  • Gretchen Schafer
  • Paige Chambers
  • Mikayla Briggs
  • Jenelle Kuhlman
  • Cassilyn Niese
  • Jackalyn Siebenaler
  • Alexis Weber
  • Rebecca Wettstein
  • Paige Priesman
  • Jacob Ruffing
  • Bailey Ann Towns
  • Emmi Fisher

People who survive brain damage (stroke, head injury) may develop aphasia, a language processing disorder which affects communication. Speech-language pathologists are often called upon to provide rehabilitation services to people with aphasia. Current research topics within this area include analysis of some of the variables which impact therapy delivery: which clients benefit most from therapy? Can we accurately predict prognostic outcomes for clients? Which language modalities should SLPs target during therapy? How should psycholinguistic exercise within therapy sessions be structured in order to assure optimal use of resources such as time and funding? How can clinicians use defensible statistical methods to track client performance over time, and demonstrate the efficacy or otherwise of intervention?

Aside from being a language disorder, aphasia may impact a wide variety of psychosocial constructs such as identity, social integration and quality of life. Socially oriented aphasiologists seek to develop a better understanding of the long-term experiences of people and families living with aphasia. To generate robust findings relevant to this field, scholars often employ qualitative methods of enquiry including Interactional Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), ethnography, Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) and Conversation Analysis (CA). By adopting a holistic perspective, researchers hope to provide clinicians and clients with strategies and ideas that may help people with aphasia (re)gain a new sense of self. This paradigm views participation in conversation in a variety of contexts as an essential part of the human condition, and therefore attempts to find ways in which people with aphasia can be supported to take part in such conversations, in spite of their linguistic processing deficits.

Swallowing disorders commonly occur in people who have suffered a neurogenic injury. Moreover, neurotypical individuals may display evidence of dysphagia as they age. Currently, speech-language pathologists rely on a limited range of clinical tools when providing services to people with swallowing disorders. In order to address this situation, more rigorous research is required. Firstly, investigations grounded in the latest models of exercise physiology will help SLPs better understand how to address the mechanical disorders of swallowing they encounter in clinical practice. Secondly, qualitative enquiry traditions will help SLPs to develop a clearer picture of how people with dysphagia view their disability, which will in turn empower us to focus on the psychosocial aspects of this disorder.

Research by ethnographers and anthropologists suggests that we are skilled problem solvers and can effectively carry out a wide range of complex tasks, because the cognitive load associated with such tasks are distributed amongst humans as well as external devices. By applying the results and methods developed during systematic, real-world based studies of human cognition to clinical disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and other amnestic deficits, therapists may gain useful insights into embedded intervention approaches that will empower clients to live with greater independence.

Publications:

Archer, B. E., & Azios, J. H. (2019). Humor in Clinical-Educational Interactions between Graduate Student Clinicians and People with Aphasia. International Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing.

Archer, B. E., Azios, J. H., & Müller, N. (2019). Effect sizes in single case aphasia studies: A comparative, autocorrelation-oriented analysis. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research.

Archer, B. E., et al. (2019). Key Wording Practices in Three Aphasia Conversation Groups: A preliminary study. Aphasiology, 33.10 (2019): 1248–1269.

Archer, B. E., Tetnowski, J., Freer, J. C., Schmadeke, S., & Christou-Franklin, E. (2018). Topic selection sequences in aphasia conversation groups. Aphasiology, 32(4), 394-416.

Azios, J. H., & Archer, B. E. (2018). Singing behaviour in a client with traumatic brain injury: a conversation analysis investigation. Aphasiology, 32(8), 944-966. 

Azios, J., & Archer, B. E. (2018). The Use of Eye Tracking to Investigate Student Clinicians Learning to Interpret Modified Barium Swallow Studies. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders.

Archer, B. E., Azios, J., Azios, M., Becerril, S., & Heels, J. (2017). “Dear Diary”: A preliminary study of the effects of consistency modification on three dimensions of wellness. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 39(4), 1-7.

Clune, T. N., Hewitt, L. E., Archer, B. E., & Lee, H. S. (2017). Communicative Behaviors Elicited by Leisure Activities in Memory Care Units. Clinical Archives of Communication Disorders, 2(3), 214-226.

Archer, B. E., Müller, N., & Penn, C. (2015). Facilitation Effects of Cueing Techniques in Two Sesotho Speakers with Anomia. Speech, Language and Hearing, 19.3, 140–152.

Archer, B. E. & Olvera, R. (2015). The best of both worlds: Clinical implications of classical and qualitative paradigms in aphasiology. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders, 6(1).

Penn, C., & Archer, B. E. (2011). The treatment of anomia in Sesotho: A case for parametric aphasiology. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 25(11-12), 1059-1065.

Presentations:

Archer, B. E., & Leaman, M. [accepted]. ‘Now You’re Talking’: Facilitating conversation-based therapy for people with aphasia. Poster to be presented at the 2019 American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.

Crumrine, K., & Archer, B. E. [accepted]. A Scoping Review of Palliative Care Training in Allied Health Professions. Poster to be presented at the 2019 American Speech and Hearing Conference, Orlando, FL.

Gulick, E. C., & Archer, B. E. [accepted]. Shared Laughter in Aphasia Groups. Poster to be presented at the 2019 American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.

Pummill, K. L., Archer, B. E., Armstrong, E., Schafer, G., & Chambers, P. [accepted]. Comprehension & Phonemic Mismatch in Disordered Speech. Poster to be presented at the 2019 American Speech and Hearing Conference, Orlando, FL.

Archer, B. E. & Azios, J. H. (2019). Dealing with Dominators: A preliminary conversation analysis of participation management in facilitated conversation groups for people with aphasia. Poster presented at the Synergy Conference, Lafayette, LA.

Archer, B. E., & Azios, J. H. (2019). Human Writes: Vygotskian speculations on multilingualism and the rise of phonemic alphabets. Poster presented at the Synergy Conference, Lafayette, LA.

Archer, B. E., & Azios, J. H. (2019). Quot Linguas Calles, Tot Homines Vales’: Combating monolingual habitus in speech-language pathology. Poster presented at the Synergy Conference, Lafayette, LA.

Archer, B. E., Azios, J. H., & Lee, J. (2019). How Can We Use Electronic Devices to Support Speakers with Limited Verbal Language during Natural Interaction? A preliminary conversation analysis (CA) study.” Poster session presented at the Aphasia Access Conference, Baltimore, MD.

Archer, B. E., Olness, G. S., & Azios, J. H. (2019). Two Tellers, One Story: An interactional analysis of successful narrative co-construction by a person with aphasia and a non-impaired interlocutor. Poster presented at the Atypical Interaction Conference, Helsinki, Finland.

Azios, J. H., Archer, B. E., & Damico, J. S. (2019). Outcome Measures for Evaluating Conversation in Aphasia Research: A descriptive review. Poster presented at the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics Conference, Taipei, Taiwan.

Azios, J. H., Archer, B. E., & Lee, J. (2019). Examining Change in the Interactional Behaviors of People with Aphasia after Conversation-Focused Therapy. Poster session presented at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Whitefish, MT.

Gulick, N. C., Archer, B. E., & Azios, J. H. (2019). Making Room at the Table: Promoting participation in facilitated conversation for people with aphasia. Poster session presented at the Annual Conference of the Ohio Speech Language and Hearing Association, Columbus, OH.

Heals, B., & Archer, B. E. (2019). Speech Errors and Word Frequency in Narratives Produced by People with Broca’s Aphasia. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium, Bowling Green, OH.

Pummill, K. L., Archer, B. E., Armstrong, E., Schafer, G., & Chambers, P. (2019). Comprehension and Phonemic Mismatch in Disordered Speech. Poster session presented at the Annual Conference of the Ohio Speech Language and Hearing Association, Columbus, OH.

Archer, B. E. (2018). Don’t Let Statistics Do a Number on You’: Understanding and Comparing Single Case Study Effect Size Measures. Presentation given at Communication Sciences and Disorders Proseminar, Bowling Green, OH.

Archer, B. E. (2018). Facilitating Aphasia Conversation Groups: Now We’re Talking. Presentation given at Northwest Ohio Speech Language Hearing Association Convention, Toledo, OH.

Archer, B. E. (2018). Hard to Swallow: An Introduction to Dysphagia and Therapeutic Consistency Modification. Presentation given at Communication Sciences and Disorders Proseminar, Bowling Green, OH.

Archer, B. E. (2018). Topic Selection in Facilitated Conversations for People with Aphasia. Presentation given at Communication Sciences and Disorders Proseminar, Bowling Green, OH.

Archer, B. E., Azios, J., & Müller, N. (2018). Effect Sizes in Aphasia Treatment: Comparing Statistical Methods. Presentation given at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Archer, B. E., Azios, J., Siebenaler, J., Wettstein, R., & Clune, T. (2018). The Write Stuff: A preliminary analysis of key wording in facilitated conversation groups for aphasia. Poster session presented at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Archer, B. E., Borgemenke, E., & Siebenaler, J. (2018) Managing Participation in Facilitated Conversation Groups for People with Aphasia. Poster session presented at The Bowling Green State University Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Symposium, Bowling Green, OH

Archer, B. E., Hartwell J., Archer, B., Azios, J., Siebenaler, J., Wettstein, R., Ruffing, J., & Clune, T.  (2018, November). Making Room at the Table: Promoting participation in facilitated conversations for people with aphasia. Presentation given at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Archer, B. E., & Russell E. (2018). Boluses Gone Wild: What’s hot and what's not in dysphagia rehab. Presentation given at The Annual Ohio Speech Language Hearing Association Convention, Columbus, OH.

Azios, J. H., & Archer, B. E. (2018). Laughing Matters: Clinician-led humor and its role in promoting client-centeredness. Paper presented at Grand Rounds Seminar, Austin, TX.

Azios, J., Archer, B. E., & Lee, J. (2018). Evaluating the Effects of a Conversation-Analysis Focused Intervention for Persons With Aphasia. Poster presentation at the 2018 American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Azios, M., Daniels, D., De Nardo, T., and Archer, B. E. (2018). A Phenomenological Study Exploring the Support Group Experiences of Teens Who Stutter & Their Parents. Poster session presented at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Brackenbury, T.P., Dubasik, V., Archer, B. E., & Fitzgerald, C. (2018). Increasing Student Engagement and Motivation through Principles of Video Game Design: A workshop. Presentation given at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Los Angeles, CA.

Morgan, M, & Archer, B. E. (2018). Non-Verbal Factors in Collaborative Repair Sequences for People with Aphasia. Poster session presented at The Bowling Green State University Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Symposium, Bowling Green, OH.

Archer, B. E. (2017). Topic Selection in Aphasia Conversation Groups. Poster session presented at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Los Angeles, CA.

Archer, B. E. (2017). Topic Selection in Facilitated Conversations for People with Aphasia. Workshop presented at Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.

Archer, B. E., Azios, J. H., & Müller, N. (2017). Assaying Effect Size Calculation Methods in Single Case Aphasiological Studies: Perspectives from the literature. Poster presented at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Snowbird, UT.

Archer, B. E., Clune, T., Morgan, M., Borgemenke, E., and Siebenaler, J. (2017). Discourse Structure in Facilitated Group Conversations for People with Aphasia. Poster session presented at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Los Angeles, CA.

Clune, T., Hewitt, L., Archer, B. E., & Lee, H. (2017). Communicative Behaviors in Response to Leisure Behaviors in Dementia.  Poster session presented at The Bowling Green State University Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Symposium, Bowling Green, OH.

Clune, T., Hewitt, L., Archer, B. E., & Lee, H. (2017). Vocalizations Elicited by Leisure Activities in a Memory Care Unit. Poster session presented at The Annual American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Los Angeles, CA.

Dunlap, K., & Archer, B. E. (2017). A Study of Interactional Dynamics in Facilitated Conversation Groups for People with Aphasia. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium, Bowling Green, OH

Müller, N., & Archer, B. E. (2017). Research in Clinical Practice: The argument for single-case studies. Poster presented at the Irish Association of Speech and Language Therapists Conference, Cork, Ireland.

Archer, B. E. (2016). Through Thick and Thin: Some reflections on consistency modification as an evidence-based element of dysphagia treatment. Presentation given at Communication Sciences and Disorders Proseminar, Bowling Green, OH.

Archer, B. E., & Müller. N. (2016). Assessment & Treatment of Cognitive & Communication Disorders: What can cognitive ethnography teach us? Paper presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Philadelphia, PA.

De Nardo, T., Azios, M., Archer, B. E., & Tetnowski, J. (2016). Successful Stuttering Management in Adolescents Who Stutter: A Qualitative Analysis. 2015 International Fluency Congress Proceedings. Paper presented at the 2015 International Fluency Congress: Embracing our differences, sharing perspectives, Lisbon (1-6). Washington, International Fluency Association.

Müller, N., & Archer, B. E. (2016). Functional Language Switching by Persons with Dementia Symptoms: Implications for cognitive & linguistic skills. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Hartwell Azios, J., Archer, B. E., Whisenhunt Saar, K., & Bronson, D. (2016). Singing as an Interactional Resource: Evidence from conversation analysis. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Archer, B. E. (2015). PICA-based therapy: Analysis of data from a clinical case. Poster presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Denver, CO.

Archer, B. E., & Damico, H. (2015). Choices, choices, choices: Selecting texts in literacy intervention. Paper presented at the meeting of the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association, Lafayette, LA.

Heels, J., Archer, B. E., Azios, M., Leafblad, S., and Hartwell, J. (2015). Dear Diary: Discoveries from seven days on a dysphagia diet. Poster presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Denver, CO.

Heels, J., et al. (2015). Fighting Pharyngeal Delay in People with Dysphagia. Paper presented at the meeting of the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association, Lafayette, LA.

Müller, N., et al. (2015). Distributed Cognition and Language Use. Paper presented at the meeting of the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association, Lafayette, LA.

Tetnowski, J., et al. (2015). Developing a Research Agenda in Stuttering. Paper presented at the meeting of the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association, Lafayette, LA

Archer, B. E. (2014). Storming the Cranial Prison: A situated-cognition oriented case study of word finding strategies in aphasia. Poster presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Orlando, FL.

Archer, B. E. and Ball, M. (2014).‘Because we speak many languages here akiri’ Aphasia, code switching and sociolinguistics in South Africa. Poster presented at the meeting of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association, Stockholm, Sweden.

Archer, B. E., & Müller, N. (2014). Distributed cognition and aphasia. Paper presented at the meeting of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association, Stockholm, Sweden.

Denardo, T., Tetnowski, J., Azios, M., & Archer, B. E. (2014). Successful Stuttering Management in Teenagers Who Stutter: A qualitative analysis. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Orlando, FL.

Hartwell, J., Heels, J., & Archer, B. E. (2014). Fighting pharyngeal delay: Through thick and thin. Paper presented at the meeting of the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association, Lafayette, LA.

Tetnowski, J., Azios, M., Denardo, T., & Archer, B. E. (2014). Self –help and stuttering: What we've learned from parents and teens. Paper presented at the meeting of the National Stuttering Association, Washington, D.C.

Tetnowski, J., Azios, M., De Nardo, T., Tetnowski, J., Archer, B. E., & Kondrashov, S. (2014). Stuttering Therapy with Teens: A review of recent findings. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Orlando, FL.

Archer, B. E. (2013). On using the right tool for the right job: what South African aphasiologists should know about the intersection between morphosyntax and phonology in Sesotho. Paper presented at the Phonetics and Phonology of Sub-Saharan Languages Conference, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Archer, B. E., & Müller, N. (2013). Lesions, lemmas and lehapu: Aphasia in Context. Paper presented at the meeting of the Linguistics Association of Canada and the United States, Brooklyn, NY.

Archer, B. E. & Müller, N. (2013). Therapy for Sesotho speakers with anomia: Towards a parametric aphasiology. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, Chicago, IL.

Archer, B. E. & Penn, C. (2011). Anomia in Sesotho: The role of parameters in therapy. Paper presented at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Fort Lauderdale, FL.