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Dr. Walter E. Grunden

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Walter E. Grunden, Ph.D.

Position: Associate Professor, graduate faculty
Phone: 419-372-8639
Email: wgrund@bgsu.edu
Address: 134 Williams Hall

AFFILIATIONS

  • Association for Asian Studies
  • History of Science Society
  • Ohio Academy of History
  • Pacific Circle

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Grunden is a historian of modern Japan and China whose research interests include science and technology policy, military intelligence, and the experience of scientists in their engagement with the state, society, and warfare, especially in the 1930s-1950s. He has published extensively on the history of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, and he has participated in several conferences, workshops, and seminars nationally and internationally. His work has been published in Japanese, German, and Russian. Grunden has been awarded research grants from the Social Science Research Council, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the Japan-United States Friendship Commission and the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, the US Department of Education, and the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan. He was a visiting scholar in residence at the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 2001-2002.

Fields of Study

  • Modern Japan/China/Korea
  • Science/Technology/Medicine
  • Military History/World War II/Korean War/Cold War
  • Nuclear Age/Nuclear Weapons/Proliferation
  • Biological and Chemical Warfare
  • Intelligence/Espionage/National Security Policy
  • Space Age/Space Race
  • Futurism/Futurology
  • Local/Ohio History

Education

  • 2001-2002     Post-Doctoral Research Scholar, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
  • 1998                Ph.D., History, University of California at Santa Barbara                      
  • 1990                M.A., History, The Ohio State University                      
  • 1987                B.A., Japanese, The Ohio State University, with honors

Selected Publications

Selected Publications:

Books

  • Secret Weapons and World War II: Japan in the Shadow of Big Science (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2005), 335 pp.
  • Bryan, Images of America Series (Arcadia Publishing, 2013), 128 pp.

Chapters in Edited Books

  • “No Retaliation in Kind: Japanese Chemical Warfare Policy in World War II,” in Proceedings of the Symposium: 100 Years of Chemical Warfare: Research, Deployment, Consequences (Berlin: Fritz Haber Institute with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), forthcoming 2016.
  • “Syllabus IV: The History of Modern China,” in David Rubel, ed., The Bedside Baccalaureate: Lectures on the Modern World (New York: Sterling, 2009), 18 pp.
  • Takashi Nishiyama, Sumiko Otsubo, and Walter E. Grunden, “Japan,” in Robert DeKosky and Douglas Allchin, History of Science in the Non-West (Gainesville, FL: History of Science Society, 2008), 73-87.
  • “Nihon no senji kaku kaihatsu to Hiroshima no kōgeki” [Japan’s Wartime Nuclear Development and the Bombing of Hiroshima], in Hiroshi Ichikawa and Masakatsu Yamazaki, eds. Aspects of “War and Science”: A Record of Two Symposia on Nuclear Weapons and Scientists (Hiroshima University Press, 2006), 59-61. (Japanese)
  • “Voina i nauka v Iaponii” [War and Science in Japan] in Eduard Kolchinsky (ed.), Nauka Ikrizisy: Istoriko-sravnitel’nye ocherki [Science and Crises: Historical-Comparative Studies] (St. Petersburg, Russia: University of St. Petersburg Press, 2003), 687-700. (Russian)
  • Michael Gordin, Walter E. Grunden, Mark Walker, and Zuoyue Wang, “‘Ideologically Correct’ Science: The French Revolution, Soviet Union, National Socialism, World War II Japan, McCarthyism, and the People’s Republic of China,” in Mark Walker, (ed.), Science and Ideology: A Comparative History (London and New York: Routledge, 2002), 35-65.
  • Michael Gordin, Walter E. Grunden, Mark Walker, and Zuoyue Wang, “‘Ideologisch Korrekte’ Wissenschaft: Französische Revolution, Sowjetunion, Nationalsozialismus, Japan im Zweiten Weltkrieg, McCarthy-Ära, Volksrepublik China,” in Uwe Hoßfeld and Rainer Brömer (eds.) Darwinismus und/als Ideologie (Berlin: Verlag für Wissenschaft und Bildung, 2001), 29-69. (German)

Academic Journal Articles (Refereed and Invited)

  • “The ‘Paranoid Style’ in the Pacific Theater: Government Cover-Ups, Conspiracy Theory, and War with Japan and Korea,” Journal for the Liberal Arts and Sciences, forthcoming Spring 2016.
  • “Hŭngnam Revisited: The ‘Secret’ Nuclear History of a North Korean City,” Intelligence and National Security 20 (October 2015): 1-14.
  • Rachel Pawlowicz and Walter E. Grunden, “Teaching Atrocities: The Holocaust and Unit 731 in the Secondary-School Curriculum,” The History Teacher 48 (February 2015): 271-294.
  • “History Lessons (I-II): Walter Grunden on Japan’s Nuclear Past,” North Korea: Witness to Transformation, web-log published by the Peterson Institute for International Economics, posted Aug. 15-16, 2013, http://www.piie.com/blogs/nk/?p=11236.
  • “Past and Future Directions in the Historiography of Japan’s Wartime Nuclear Research,”
  • Gijutsu Bunka Ronsō [Tokyo Institute of Technology Studies in the History of Science] No. 8 (2005): 51-61.
  • Keiko Nagase-Reimer, Walter E. Grunden, Masakatsu Yamazaki, “Nuclear Weapons Research in Japan during the Second World War,” in Mark Walker and Masakatsu Yamazaki, eds., Comparative History of Nuclear Weapons Projects in Japan, Germany, and Russia in the 1940s, Special Issue, Historia Scientiarum [The International Journal of the History of Science Society of Japan], 14-3 (March 2005): 201-240.
  • Walter E. Grunden, Yutaka Kawamura, Eduard Kolchinsky, Helmut Maier, and Masakatsu Yamazaki, “Laying the Foundation for Wartime Research: A Comparative Overview of Science Mobilization in Nazi Germany, Japan, and the Soviet Union,” in Mark Walker and Carola Sachse, eds., Politics and Science in Wartime: Comparative International Perspectives on Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes, Osiris 20 (2005): 79-106.
  • Walter E. Grunden, Mark Walker, and Masakatsu Yamazaki, “Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear Energy in Wartime Germany and Japan,” in Mark Walker and Carola Sachse, eds., Politics and Science in Wartime: Comparative International Perspectives on Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes, Osiris 20 (2005): 107-130.
  • “Voina i nauka v Iaponii” [War and Science in Japan], in Naukovedenie 3 (2001): 189-201. (Russian)
  • “Hŭngnam and the Japanese Atomic Bomb: Recent Historiography of a Postwar Myth,”Intelligence and National Security 13 (Summer 1998): 32-60.

Projects:

  • “Physicists and Fellow Travelers: General Willoughby’s Anti-Communist Crusade in Occupied Japan.” (article-length draft in progress)
  • Scientists under MacArthur: Intelligence, Espionage, and Science Policy in Occupied Japan. Draft in progress. (Monograph)
  • No Retaliation in Kind: Japan’s Chemical Warfare in Asia and the Pacific in World War II and Beyond. Draft in progress. (Monograph)

Presentations

  • “The Rabbits of Okunoshima: Public Memory and the Legacies of Chemical Warfare in Japan,” Panel: After Ypres: The Integration of Science into War, Part II: Reactions to the Integration of Science into War, History of Science Society, San Francisco, CA, November 22, 2015.
  • “Empowering Hŭngnam: The Transwar Legacy of Japanese Scientific, Technological, and Industrial Development of a Korean City,” Panel: Post-Colonial Life and Politics of Colonial Science, History of Science Society/Philosophy of Science Association, Chicago, IL, November 8, 2014.
  • “From Hŭngnam to Yongbyon: Myths and Facts about the Origins of North Korea’s Nuclear Program,” Nuclear Asia: A Symposium on Policy, Proliferation, and Weapons Research in the Cold War and Beyond, BGSU, Bowling Green, OH, October 11-12, 2007.
  • “Of Silk and Sealing Wax: Why Was There No ‘Big Science’ Revolution in World War II Japan?” 54th Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, September 23-25, 2005.
  • “Big Science and Weapons Development Policy in World War II Japan: Reflections on Comparisons to Nazi Germany,” 22nd International Congress of the History of Science Society, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, July 24-30, 2005.
  • “Organizing for War: Group Identity, Science Policy, and the Mobilization of Scientific Research in World War II Japan,” Panel: Intersection of Socio-Political Constructs and Science and Technology Policy in Modern Japan, Association for Asian Studies, Chicago, IL, March 24, 2001.
  • “‘Ideologically Correct’ Science: The Case of World War II Japan,” History of Science Society, Pittsburgh, PA, November 7, 1999.

Invited Talks

  • “No Retaliation in Kind: Japanese Chemical Weapons Policy in China and the Pacific,” Symposium: 100 Years of Chemical Warfare: Research, Deployment, Consequences, Sponsored by the Fritz Haber Institute and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Harnack House, Berlin, Germany, April 21-22, 2015.
  • “Scientists under MacArthur: Anti-Communism and Science Policy in the US Occupation of Japan,” Panel: Science and Medicine in Modern Japan, Institute for Japanese Studies Lecture Series, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, March 28, 2014.
  • Featured Book Panel, Secret Weapons and World War II, Ohio Academy of History Annual Meeting, University of Akron, Akron, OH, April 3-4, 2009.
  • Keynote Speaker, “Science and War: Lessons from World War II,” Keynote Address (Day 2), Third Undergraduate Asian Studies Symposium, Marietta College, Marietta, OH, November 10-11, 2006.
  • Keynote Speaker, “Remembering the War in the Pacific: Problems in Historical Research in East Asia,” Keynote Address (Day 1), Third Undergraduate Asian Studies Symposium, Marietta College, Marietta, OH, November 10-11, 2006.
  • “What Legacy? Yongbyon, Hŭngnam, and Japan’s Alleged Nuclear Weapons Research in North Korea during World War II,” Conference and Workshop on the History of Nuclear Weapons Development in Asia, Union College, Schenectady, NY, September 15-18, 2005.
  • “Science Policy and Weapons of Mass Destruction in World War II Japan,” The Johns Hopkins University Program in the History of Science, Medicine and Technology, A Conversation on the Future of History of East Asian Science, Medicine and Technology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, September 12-13, 2003.
  • Commentator, “International Comparison of Nuclear Projects: The Social Responsibility of Scientists at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age,” Public Symposium at the Hiroshima Peace-Memorial Museum, Hiroshima, Japan, August 10, 2003.
  • Commentator, “International Comparison of Nuclear Projects: The Social Responsibility of Scientists at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age,” Nuclear History Workshop at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, August 8, 2003.
  • “Reflections on Past and Future Directions in the Historiography of Japan’s World War II Nuclear Weapons Research,” Nuclear History Workshop at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, August 7, 2003.
  • “Laying the Foundation for Wartime Research: A Comparative Overview of Science Mobilization and Policy in Nazi Germany, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States,” Conference and Workshop: A Comparative History of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society under National Socialism, Max Planck Institute, Berlin, Germany, December 5-7, 2002.
  • “Senjika Nihon no kagaku gijutsu dōin ni tsuite: sono zentai zōrikai no tame ni” [The Mobilization of Science and Technology in Wartime Japan: Making Sense of the Big Picture], with Kawamura Yutaka, Tuesday Colloquium, Tokyo Institute of Technology History of Science Program, Graduate School of Decision Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2002.
  • “Reassessing Tateshakai, Ie and Contextual Theory: The Case of the Mobilization of Science and Technology in World War II Japan,” Meguro Lyceum of Science, Technology, and Society Studies, Tokyo, Japan, February 22, 2002.
  • Commentator, “Senjiki Nihon no gijutsu dōin taisei no tokuchō to kagaku gijutsu seisaku no kigen” [The Characteristics of Japan’s Wartime Technology Mobilization System and the Origin of Science and Technology Policy], Sino-Japanese Conference on Modern Science and Technology History, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, August 19, 2001.

Courses Taught

Department of History (HIST), American Culture Studies (ACS), Asian Studies (AS), Chinese (CHIN) in Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, and Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS)            

Undergraduate Courses:

  • AS/PACS 3000: Peace and Cultural Legacies in the Nuclear Age (team taught)
  • AS 4800: Senior Seminar: Selected Topics
  • AS/HIST 1800: Asian Civilizations (also taught as on-line course)
  • CHIN 2160: Contemporary Chinese Culture
  • HIST 3010: American Military History (on-line course)
  • HIST 3030: World War II (also taught as on-line course)
  • HIST 3820: Chinese Civilization
  • HIST 3910: Special Topics: History of the Future
  • HIST 3910: Special Topics: Great Debates in Policy History
  • HIST 4070: Modern China
  • HIST 4080: Premodern Japan
  • HIST 4090: Modern Japan
  • HIST 4800: Senior Seminar: Science and War
  • HIST 4800: Senior Seminar: Great Conspiracies in US History                   

Graduate Courses:

  • HIST 5070: Modern China
  • HIST 5080: Premodern Japan
  • HIST 5090: Modern Japan
  • HIST 6180: US Science Policy
  • HIST 6740: Readings in Modern East Asia
  • HIST/ACS 6760: Seminar in American Culture Studies: History of the Future
  • HIST 7800: Comparative Public Policy (US and East Asia)
  • 2016: American Library Association,  SAGE Encyclopedia of Alcohol named one of ten best Reference Works
  • 2013: Honorable Mention, Bowling Green State University Libraries Local History Publication Awards, for Bryan, Images of America Series (Arcadia Publishing, 2013).
  • 2012-2013: Nominated for “Master Teacher Award”
  • 2009: Who’s Who in America 2010, A Marquis Who’s Who Publication.
  • 2006-2008: Phi Beta Kappa Inductee Distinction for “Most Influential Teacher” at BGSU
  • 2005: Authors and Artists Award, Friends of the University Libraries, BGSU.
  • 2015: Japan-United States Friendship Commission and the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, Research Travel Grant for the United States.
  • 2009-2010: Sabbatical Leave, BGSU, full academic year, research and residence in Shenyang, Changchun, and Harbin, China.
  • 2001-2002: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the Social Science Research Council, Post-doctoral Research Fellowship, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 2001: Japan-United States Friendship Commission and the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, Short-Term Travel Grant to Japan.
  • 1993: Japan-United States Friendship Commission and the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, Research Travel Grant for the United States.
  • 1992-1993: Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, The Ohio State University and the U.S. Department of Education.
  • 1992: Asia Library Travel Grant, Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan.