Learning Community Seminars

THESE SECTIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING COMMUNITIES. STUDENT MUST BE A MEMBER OF THAT LEARNING COMMUNITY TO ENROLL

Mythbusters: Falcon Edition 

Section: 1017/77886
Meeting Time: Thursdays, 4:00-5:45PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

Weight gain, binge drinking, and all-nighters during college are widely touted. Google searches for these phenomena return millions of hits. Are these college student epidemics, or media hype? You and your classmates will sort fact from fiction. You will use your investigative skills to sleuth answers to questions like:

  • Is college a big, four-year party? Do I need to go Greek to make friends?
  • Is dining hall food gross and unhealthy?
  • Do I work best at the last minute, under pressure? Are professors easy to manipulate?
  • Can social media be used for learning? Will my general education courses be boring?

You will meet real-life survivors (upperclassmen, graduate students, professors, etc.). Though a variety of active-learning techniques, you will explore answers to these and other questions. In addition, you will use popular technology to create a survival guide for next year’s Falcon freshmen.

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May-Jon Ludy

Position: Assistant Professor, Food and Nutrition
Email: mludy@bgsu.edu
Address: 135 Health and Human Services

Mary-Jon Ludy is a forever Falcon! She graduated from BGSU with a BS in Dietetics in 2002 and joined the faculty in 2011. Meanwhile, Mary-Jon worked as an outpatient dietitian in Boston, interned with a Vitamin A program in Nepal, conducted HIV research in Thailand, and taught community development in Costa Rica. At BGSU, she teaches clinical nutrition courses and does research on bioactive spices and weight management. Outside of work, she enjoys playing with her sons, bicycling, and traveling.

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Jess Kiss

Position: Instructor - School of Human Movement Sport and Leisure Studies
Email: jekiss@bgsu.edu
Address: Eppler Complex

This course will be taught by Dr. Jessica Kiss. Dr. Kiss is a Forever Falcon! She earned her M.Ed. from BGSU in 2009 and returned as faculty in 2016. After completing her Master’s degree, Dr. Kiss worked as a health screener for a nationwide fitness company and was a health and fitness educator for the Cleveland Clinic. Following those positions, Dr. Kiss worked for Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan and started her Ph.D. program at Michigan State University before starting at BGSU as an Instructor in the Exercise Science Program. Currently at BGSU, Dr. Kiss teaches Exercise Testing and Prescription for Special Cases, Organization and Administration of Exercise Programs, Applied Exercise Physiology, Motor Development Across the Lifespan, and Laboratory Techniques in Exercise Physiology. Her research focuses on the relationship between campus recreation participation and student academic success.

Finding Your Voice in Social Justice Learning Community

Aunt Jemima, Rich Uncle Pennybags, and the Kool-Aid Man: Gender & Race in Advertising

Section: 1069/76764
Meeting Time: Thursdays, 4:00-4:50 PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

This course focuses on identifying and deconstructing stereotypes of race and gender in advertising to help students gain a better understanding of how a media form (that almost everyone disregards) acts to support and perpetuate real-world racial and gender inequality. By examining how advertising icons and brand mascots have (and have not) changed over the years, students will be able to see when and how brands respond to societal changes. These responses are an indirect statement about what really matters—and to whom.

This 1910 is only open to students in the Finding Your Voice in Social Justice Learning Community

Apply Now!

The course will use a problem-posing pedagogical approach to help students hone their critical thinking abilities by learning to listen to (and hear) diverse viewpoints and perspectives; dialoguing to become better able to understand how their own social positions connect to larger structures and institutions; and using the knowledge and understanding gained to be more responsible citizens with insight into cultural rules and biases. Course content will primarily consist of short video clips, print advertising (historic and contemporary), and news articles from mainstream news organizations. Students will also engage with and do research in social media, including YouTube videos, Twitter, and Instagram. There is no textbook for the class.

Assignments and activities will help students engage in academic analysis of popular culture, demonstrating the relevance of intellectual engagement to real-world day-to-day issues. Informal interviewing of a faculty member about race and gender representation in their field will provide opportunities for students to become acquainted with the kind of critical thinking skills that higher education helps hone. Students will be encouraged to attend campus events related to race and gender, and at least one out of class activity will be a trip to the grocery store to identify and analyze brand mascots. The final project asks students to construct a visual argument about a particular advertising approach and/or mascot, which they will present to their class and the campus community.

Jessica Birch

Jessica Birch

Position: Instructor - Department of Ethnic Studies and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program
Email: jebirch@bgsu.edu
Address: 239 Shatzel Hall

Jessica Birch is originally from Pittsburgh, PA, and is an instructor in the Department of Ethnic Studies and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in American Studies: Theory and Cultural Studies, as well as a graduate certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, from Purdue University in 2014. Her teaching and research focus on black feminist theory, critical race theory, contemporary popular culture/cultural studies, critical pedagogy, and the intersections among these areas. She has published research on gender, sexuality, race, nationalism, and neoliberalism in contemporary popular culture.

The Politics of Sex

Section: 1042/76763
Meeting Time: Thursdays, 4:00-4:50 PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

Although some aspects of sex may be “natural,” sex is largely socially constructed. What counts as sex, how it is practiced, and even how it is experienced changes over time and across cultures. This course explores some of the contemporary politics that shape sex and sexuality at the present moment. Students will write and curate a course blog about sexual politics at BGSU and our Northwest Ohio community, participate in a service-learning project, and have opportunities to attend field trips and other cultural events. 

This 1910 is only open to students in the Finding Your Voice in Social Justice Learning Community

Apply Now!

Course goals:

  1. Students will be able to compare sexuality cross-culturally and historically.
  2. Students will be able to describe how sexuality intersects with race, gender, class, disability and other aspects of identity.
  3. Students will be able to engage with debates and conversations about contemporary events and popular texts, explaining the sexual politics at play in the text/event.
  4. Students will apply course content through involvement with community and/or university sexuality-related organizations and/or special events through a service-learning activity and field trips.
  5. Students will connect with faculty and peers through a series of guest speakers and interview assignments (which they can publish on their class blog, see goal #).
  6. Students will develop writing and teamwork skills as they work together on a class blog.
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Sarah Rainey-Smithback

Position: Associate Professor - School of Cultural and Critical Studies
Email: sasarah@bgsu.edu
Address: 231 Shatzel Hall

Dr. Rainey-Smithback is an Associate Professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program. Dr. Rainey-Smithback received her PhD from The Ohio State University in Women’s Studies, with a specialization in Sexuality Studies and Disability Studies. Her first book, Love, Sex, and Disability: The Pleasure of Care examined intimate relationships between people with disabilities and their nondisabled partners. She has also published on topics related to HIV/AIDS disclosure, lesbian sexuality and families, sexual representation in film, BDSM identity, and is currently working on a book project analyzing the politics of sexual orientation and gender identity in the Boy Scouts of America and the Girl Scouts of the USA. 

¡Si Se Puede! (Yes We Can)

Section: 1099/76972
Meeting Time: Thursdays, 4:00-4:50 PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

In the late 1960s under the banner of ¡Si Se Puede! (Yes We Can), Mexican and Mexican American farmworkers fought for better wages in California. Those events influenced generations of Latino/a/x, as they struggled for social justice on campuses throughout the United States. This seminar focuses on those struggles by educating students about the historical and contemporary histories of Latino/a/x activism in Northwest Ohio by exploring counter-narratives and archives.

This 1910 is only open to students in the Finding Your Voice in Social Justice Learning Community

Apply Now!

Students will read, discuss, analyze selected material on Latino/a/x activism, which focuses on the past, present, and future histories of student activism. Also, students will conduct research through the university archives on the histories of social justice activism at Bowling Green State University and in Northwest Ohio. And finally, this seminar is part of the Finding Your Voice in Social Justice Learning Community.

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Louis Moreno

Position: Lecturer- Ethnic Studies
Email: lmoreno@bgsu.edu
Address: 228 Shatzel Hall

Dr. Moreno is a lecturer in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, Department of Ethnic Studies teaching Latina/o Studies. Dr. Moreno's research focuses on the intersections of labor, migration, and activism among the Mexican working-class communities in the United States, especially the Southwest & Midwest.

Chapman Learning Community

The Veteran Assessment and Service Team

Section: 1004/73573
Meeting Time: Thursdays, 1:00-2:15PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

The BGSU 1910 seminar will be taught in conjunction with, and linked to, RESC 2000: Field Experience, as it was in AY 2018-2019. This course is reserved for first-year students in the Chapman Learning Community. The paired courses provide a venue for a various pedagogical approaches, including small group discussions, visiting speakers, theoretical and historical readings pertaining to the social issues being confronted in each course, and on-site service in association with a variety of well-established community partners.

Chapman BGSU 1910/RESC 2000 Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a developing sense of community and shared responsibility;
  2. Relate your learning community experiences to their impact on the community and yourself
  3. Be able to explain the social issue(s) your class has researched, and has/have worked to address, through your community partnerships and service work;
  4. Practice leadership skills through forming service-learning community partnerships, negotiating mutually beneficial needs, planning and executing service projects, debriefing with your community partner about the successes/shortcomings of the partnership, and reflecting upon your work through reflection essays and/or projects;
  5. refine your communication and writing skills through class assignments; and
  6. Explore a variety of different “transition” issues and skills that will help you better transition from high school to college.
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Brett Holden

Position: Coordinator, Learning Communities
Director, Chapman Learning Community
Email: bholden@bgsu.edu
Address: University Hall

Wintergarden

Section: 1001/73570
Meeting Time: Mondays, 1:30-2:20PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

The BGSU 1910 seminar will be taught in conjunction with, and linked to, RESC 2000: Field Experience, as it was in AY 2018-2019. This course is reserved for first-year students in the Chapman Learning Community. The paired courses provide a venue for a various pedagogical approaches, including small group discussions, visiting speakers, theoretical and historical readings pertaining to the social issues being confronted in each course, and on-site service in association with a variety of well-established community partners.

Chapman BGSU 1910/RESC 2000 Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a developing sense of community and shared responsibility;
  2. Relate your learning community experiences to their impact on the community and yourself
  3. Be able to explain the social issue(s) your class has researched, and has/have worked to address, through your community partnerships and service work;
  4. Practice leadership skills through forming service-learning community partnerships, negotiating mutually beneficial needs, planning and executing service projects, debriefing with your community partner about the successes/shortcomings of the partnership, and reflecting upon your work through reflection essays and/or projects;
  5. refine your communication and writing skills through class assignments; and
  6. Explore a variety of different “transition” issues and skills that will help you better transition from high school to college.
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Ian Young

Position: Senior Lecturer - Philosophy
Email: iyoung@bgsu.edu
Address: 309 Shatzel Hall

Pet Rescue

Section: 1003/73572
Meeting Time: Mondays, 11:30-12:20PM
Semester Length: Regular Session

The BGSU 1910 seminar will be taught in conjunction with, and linked to, RESC 2000: Field Experience, as it was in AY 2018-2019. This course is reserved for first-year students in the Chapman Learning Community. The paired courses provide a venue for a various pedagogical approaches, including small group discussions, visiting speakers, theoretical and historical readings pertaining to the social issues being confronted in each course, and on-site service in association with a variety of well-established community partners.

Chapman BGSU 1910/RESC 2000 Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a developing sense of community and shared responsibility;
  2. Relate your learning community experiences to their impact on the community and yourself
  3. Be able to explain the social issue(s) your class has researched, and has/have worked to address, through your community partnerships and service work;
  4. Practice leadership skills through forming service-learning community partnerships, negotiating mutually beneficial needs, planning and executing service projects, debriefing with your community partner about the successes/shortcomings of the partnership, and reflecting upon your work through reflection essays and/or projects;
  5. refine your communication and writing skills through class assignments; and
  6. Explore a variety of different “transition” issues and skills that will help you better transition from high school to college.
Bird

Holly Bird

Position: Lecturer - English
Email: hbird@bgsu.edu
Address: 345 East Hall

EDHD Learning Community

EDHD Falcon FOCUS

Section: 1093/78399
Meeting Time: Tuesdays, 5:00-5:50PM
Session Length: Regular Session

This course will encourage academic and social engagement to build a foundation for students’ educational and personal growth at BGSU. Through a series of guest speakers, panels, as well as campus exploration, students will be exposed to various student service resources that will aid in their transition to college life and scholarly learning. Students will receive a guided introduction to BGSU and college life in order to set them up for success and will be encouraged to engage in both campus and learning community activities.

EDHD Falcon FOCUS will require students to engage with numerous campus offices and think critically about the role these departments will play in their educational experiences at BGSU. Students will have the opportunity to present to their peers the unique services offered on campus and in the community. Guest speakers will also be brought in to provide other perspectives and expertise. Engagement in social and academic activities hosted by the EDHD Learning Community will be required throughout the semester to increase sense of belonging and support academic success. In additional to utilizing campus partners and services, course topics will include time management, goal-setting, course registration, Canvas, MyBGSU, and communication with faculty.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Engage: This BGSU 1910 course will bring in guest speakers from numerous offices on campus and will encouraged the utilization of these services. For example, we will have a presentation from RecWell and students will earn course points by going to the rec center. Students will also be required to attend various campus and Learning Community events throughout the semester. Events include Campus Fest, and the Expand your Horizons Fair. Additionally, the EDHD Learning Community will offer one social and one academic event per month (e.g. board game nights, registration events, resume workshops). Students will be asked to reflect on their campus experiences to help them understand the positive impact these experiences have the connections they are building at the university.
  • Connect: This BGSU 1910 Course will host a faculty panel and a lesson about appropriate communication with faculty. Students will be encouraged to attend office hours with faculty and to join major-specific organizations to build relationships with peers and faculty in their program. The EDHD Learning Community has student leaders who serve as mentors to the 1st year student in this BGSU1910 and will be there as an added support throughout the academic year.
  • Involve: This BGSU1910 will encourage campus involvement by requiring Campus Fest and interaction with at least 3 tables of interest to them. EDHD event attendance will be required in this course to help build a sense of belonging within the EDHD community and build permanent peer support.
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Claire Hoover

Email: choover@bgsu.edu
Address: 101 University Hall

Claire Hoover is a two time graduate of BGSU completing a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology in 2010 and a Master of Arts in College Student Personnel in 2013. Claire completed her Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling in 2015 and holds her professional counseling licensure. Claire has served in higher education roles at Owens Community College, University of Toledo, and most recently Bowling Green State University. She has co-taught a paraprofessional Resident Advisor training course, in addition to teaching UNIV1310: Career and Life Planning in Fall 2015, and ACEN1000, a course for student on academic probation/warning in Spring 2016. Claire has experience in facilitating workshops and psycho-educational classes on stress management and mental health. Claire is enthusiastic about higher education and life-long learning. She believes that every interaction she has with a student should in some way help them learn, develop, and grow.