Expand Your Mind

Smart Word Games

Section: 1046-73894
Wednesdays, 12:00-12:50PM

Is pulcheromphalectomy (beautiful belly-button removal) a real word? No, it was made up by a BGSU student in one of the games we will play in the Smart Word Games 1910 First Year seminar. Take this seminar to gain a real advantage in college and in life so that you will not be intimidated by technical terms or jargon. Each class will feature a guest appearance by a different professor in (GREAL - German, Russian, East Asian Languages) and (ROCS - Romance and Classical Studies - French, Spanish, ancient Greek, Italian, Latin) who will lead the seminar in word games that may not make you any smarter, but will certainly lead others (including your teachers) to think you are. 

The course will introduce Latin and Greek word roots (A-Z). Such word roots make up 70%-80% of the words in technical fields and in the humanities. Exposure to these terms will be invaluable, truly helping students in college and life. Class will be conducted with group games such as “make up word” contests and others. Each session will feature a guest speaker from the Departments of GREAL/ROCS who will talk about word roots as relevant to their language of expertise for a wonderful introduction to the world of languages.

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Dr. Carlo Celli

Position: Professor
Department of Romance and Classical Studies
Email: celli@bgsu.edu
Address: 221 Shatzel Hall

Carlo Celli, Ph.D. UCLA, B.A. University of Virginia also studied at the universities of Florence and Bologna. He has an upcoming book on rhetoric entitled Control Words. He is the author of books on the historical, economic and social factors influencing culture. Works include: The Essence of Machiavelli: The Prince (Axios Press 2011); National Identity in Global Cinema: How Movies Explain the World (Palgrave MacMillan 2011); Il carnevale di Machiavelli (Leo S. Olschki 2009); A New Guide to Italian Cinema (Palgrave MacMillan 2007); From Resistance to Terrorism: The Cinema of Gillo Pontecorvo (Scarecrow Press 2005); The Divine Comic: The Cinema of Roberto Benigni (Scarecrow Press 2001). Celli has published on literature, film and culture in journals including Annali d'italianistica, Critical Inquiry, Film Quarterly, Italica, Italian Culture, Italian Quarterly, Journal of Popular Film and Television, Renaissance Quarterly, Romance Quarterly and has contributed/consulted for periodicals including The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Philosophy Begins In Wonder

COURSE IS CLOSED

Section: 1023-73880
Tuesdays, 2:30-3:20PM

Although everyone has a philosophy, many wonder about what philosophy is, what the study of philosophy involves, and whether taking courses in it has any value. We will explore these wonders in the context of the college education you are just beginning and, in particular, how you can maximize the benefit you get from this journey.

In addition to spending time exploring a number of stimulating philosophical questions which encourage thinking outside of the box, we will discuss some of the challenges you will face in college and form groups to learn about and report on different resources and activities that can help you meet these challenges.

Summer-Alumni-BGPX5809

Dr. Lou Katzner

Position: Trustee Professor - Department of Philosophy
Email: lkatzne@bgsu.edu
Address: 329 Shatzel Hall

Lou Katzner joined the philosophy department at Bowling Green State University in 1969. He has studied the values that arise in human and social interactions in a variety of areas: medicine, law, politics, and the education of children. Lou served as an administrator for 13 years beginning in 1985. He was named Trustee Professor of Philosophy upon returning to teaching philosophy on a full-time basis in 1998.

Magic And The Math Of Lotteries

Section: 1039-73892
Thursdays, 6:00-6:50PM

A lottery is essentially a mathematical game involving the selection of correct numbers for prizes. Various forms and game rules of lotteries across the world are actually governed by the same mathematical principle. In this course, we will select several lotteries as examples to discuss the chance of winning a lottery by unveiling ways of numerical pattern generation. The course will demonstrate the function of mathematics in daily life at an accessible and enjoyable level; nurture student’s intellectual growth in decision-making under uncertainty; and lead students to explore new research approaches in probability and statistics. Students will have a chance to design their own games, to learn mathematics in a fresh style, and to build their confidence in mathematics through collaborative class activities.

The course will introduce students into the subject by playing simulated lotteries in class. After discussing mathematical principles, students will create their own lotteries, and experiment with different selecting strategies to figure out optimal decision rules under constraint resources. To enhance student’s learning outcome, guest speakers will be invited, student-oriented projects will be assigned for class presentations and discussions at the end of the course. While all students in the class will build their confidence in mathematics through collaborative games, interested students with advanced mathematics background may be able to participate in current research projects of the instructor.

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Dr. John Chen

Position: Professor
Department of Math and Statistics
Email: jchen@bgsu.edu
Address: 428 Math Science Building

Dr. John Chen is Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. He has taught various courses in mathematics and statistics at BGSU since 2000. His major research areas include biostatistics and probability, in which he has published a book and more than 50 research papers. Dr. Chen has trained eight PhD graduates in statistics at BGSU.

Understanding Medical Data

Section: 1089-74712
Tuesdays, 6:00-6:50PM

Medical data appear almost everywhere, including health records, diagnosis reports, medicine dose information, epidemiology, and disease prevention strategies. Correctly understanding and interpreting the actual meaning behind medical data will help freshman develop the ability of data analysis in various fields such as biology, physics, business, statistics, psychology, health, mathematics, to list just a few. In this seminar course, we will broaden students’ knowledge in basic principles and skills for the understanding of national health and diet data, disease prevention data, dose-response data, and epidemiological data.

Students in this class will work together in class projects in a student-oriented learning environment. To enhance the learning effect, we will invite outside speakers from the Toledo Hospital and the Biostatistics Department of the University of Michigan. This seminar course will add an accessible dimension of effective learning for the students. The class will practice skills to reveal interesting data information in an easily comprehensible setting for freshmen. At the end of the course, students will gain an eye-opening experience in working with medical data.

Chen_John2

Dr. John Chen

Position: Professor
Department of Math and Statistics
Email: jchen@bgsu.edu
Address: 428 Math Science Building

Dr. John Chen is Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. He has taught various courses in mathematics and statistics at BGSU since 2000. His major research areas include biostatistics and probability, in which he has published a book and more than 50 research papers. Dr. Chen has trained eight PhD graduates in statistics at BGSU.