Resume

Resume-SellingYourself.jpg
"The Business Career Accelerator has helped me construct my resume completely, it was so easy to make the perfect resume." - Business Student

Your resume provides the first impression a potential employer will have of you.  Make it count.
Click the links below to explore resources to help you create an excellent resume.

General Tips

  1. 2-Step Process:
    1. Write and refine content.
    2. Design layout and navigation.
  2. Avoid empty white space.  It makes your resume appear incomplete and lacking in areas.
  3. Key Words. (Eyes & Scanners) More employers are using software to scan the resume you send or submit via their career portal, searching for key words.  Use key words from the job description and place them in your resume, increasing your views.
  4. Numbers Game. Use #'s and figures whenever you can. Dollar$ generated, clients served, % increases/decreases, ratios, etc. These jump out and impress. FOR EXAMPLE:
    ORIGINAL: Managed budget to increase clientèle.
    IMPROVED: Managed $60,000 budget, targeting new clientèle, resulting in 50 new clients, $230,000 in new revenue, 78,000 new page views, and 5,354 likes.
  5. Utilize entire line length, don’t create unnecessary line breaks, resulting in empty space.
  6. "Save As" 
    • Always send (email) as pdf file.  It is universal and won't change your document on the receiving end.
    • Send test emails to your other email accounts (Eg. gmail, yahoo, etc.) on other computers (Mac, PC) to be sure your resume opens correctly.
  7. Name Game. Don't vaguely name your resume file as E.g. "Resume 2". Use your name, E.g. "Thomas_Siebenaler_Resume"
  8. Consistency.  All text should be uniform, with matching alignment and professional. 
  9. Title Twins. Section headings should be identical and match formatting exactly.
  10. Avoid writing too much.  Write short and to-the-point.  Think newspaper headlines.  Use lists, get to the point quick.
  11. Contact. Don't write "Phone" and "Email" in your contact info., it's redundant. (Unless specifying between home and cell phones)
  12. Dates. All should be formatted and listed identically. Dashes should match exactly (E.g. dash vs. Em dash, etc.)
  13. Phone Format. Use this format only: (419) 372-4081
  14. Location Lock? To advertise your mobility, you can add a statement to your contact info. at top such as: "Willing/able to relocate anywhere in United States."
  15. Acronyms: Define ALL acronyms used, for example, you can't simply list "BGSU", use this format "Bowling Green State University (BGSU)" - NOW, from that point forward (down) on your resume, you can use "BGSU". Only AFTER you have defined the acronym, can you use it anywhere else.
  16. GPA: Unless otherwise requested, only list your GPA if it is = or > 3.0.  Not sure what your current GPA is?  Click here to use BGSU's GPA calculator.
  17. Multiple pages.  At this point in your career, keep it to 1 page.  95% of employers agree.  If more than 1, subsequent pages should be at least 1/2 a page (not partial or 1 or 2 lines) and must not repeat information. Also, all subsequent pages should have the following as a footer:
    1. First and Last Name
    2. Phone
    3. Email
    4. Page __ of __
    5. EXAMPLE: Tom Siebenaler - thomacs@bgsu.edu - 419-372-4081 - Page 2 of 2
      (PAGE 1 NOTE: The first page should have "Page 1 of 2" in the footer.)
  18. This is a test.  Your resume serves as a writing example, showcasing how you organize and interpret information and how effectively you communicate. When employers first look at your resume, they are trying to find mistakes first, and if they find even 1, you're out of the running.
  19. Proofread everything and don’t trust spell or grammar check.
  20. Don’t limit yourself by telling an employer how much you feel you know about a certain program, skill, etc.  (“Limited knowledge”, “Some experience with…”) They could misinterpret your skill level.
  21. Fluff. Generally, avoid overusing terms such as, good attendance, team-player, multitasking, etc.  Employers refer to this as "fluff", adding no value. (Use our SKILLS page for help)

SECTION NAMES

Education
Objective
Career Goal
Experience
Skills
Career History
Industry Knowledge
Awards
Personal
Achievements
Scholarships
Honors
Related Coursework
Activities
Professional Affiliations
Interests
Qualifications
Technical
Volunteer Work
Software
Community 

EMPLOYER TIPS

file

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)

RESUME INSIGHT

In addition to your Name and Email at the top of your resume, add your LinkedIn address.
Click the LinkedIn logo here for tips:

LinkedIn-Logo.svg

Tools & Examples

BGSU ALUMNI

Feel free to email us your resume should you need assistance with your career transition or advancement.  CONTACT US

 

SECTION-BY-SECTION TIPS:

Click on each section tab below for specific advice on that section.

OBJECTIVE/SUMMARY STATEMENT:

  • This is an optional section, with fewer and fewer employers wanting it included. 
  • Employers feel it wastes space, is redundant, and states the obvious, taking up valueable area on your resume. 
  • If used, it should only be a very specific career statement, nothing more (one sentence). 
  • Some examples:
    • "Seeking sales data analytics position with textile company in the Pacific Northwest."
    • "Motivated sales professional seeking position in athletics, anywhere on United States east coast."
    • "Italian student (legally approved for U.S. employment) seeking fashion industry finance position in New York City."

VERY IMPORTANT: If you’re searching for an internship or co-op, don’t include only that you are searching for “co-ops” and/or “internships”.   A job that can count for these does not have to be named a “co-op”, etc. to be approved.  As long as you are hired for a job that meets the requirements, you’re good to go.  You should state you are searching for a “position” (keep it simple, not too much at first). 

EDUCATION:

In addition to the “general” information (Name of school, location, major, etc.) be sure to include:

  • Activities participated in  (can be it's own section)
  • Honors received  (can be it's own section)
  • Events/Workshops attended
  • Anything showing you've done more than simply complete coursework
  • Any continuing education, or certifications
  • Study abroad experiences

EXPERIENCE:

When listing previous experience(s) (formal or informal) the most important details are describing your job duties, what skills you obtained on the job.  These tell the employer what talents, skills, and abilities you have that can now be used for their advantage.  Here's how you do it:

2-6 bullet points per position (depending on time there), each only 1 line in length (say more with less, get to the point quickly)

USE A 1-SENTENCE FORMAT:  WHAT + HOW = RESULT

  1. WHAT – task completed
  2. HOW – using what tools/resources
  3. RESULT – prove you did a good job using #s/figures or outcome statements

EXAMPLE 1:

Increased 4th quarter sales (WHAT) by 20% (RESULT) using group discounts and enhanced customer relations. (HOW)

EXAMPLE 2:
Reduced May 2015 component costs (WHAT) by $3,000 (RESULT) through contract with new vendor. (HOW)

At present, you may have too little listed under your positions, describing the tasks you completed in that position.  Don't sell yourself short.  Even if you do not think it is relevant or important, any piece of information you write on your resume can act as a catalyst for that employer to notice you.  The more you leave off, the greater you increase your chances of not making a connection with that employer.

SKILLS/TALENTS/ABILITIES:

This section can be used as a utility section, meaning a place to highlight yourself and the skills you have acquired throughout your life.  These skills can include those learned in the classroom or from previous jobs you have had.  They might also include a skill you’ve taught yourself, something you’ve learned from your grandfather, mother, father, brother, friend, etc.

Include very specific skills, make a CONNECTION with your reader.  SEE OUR DETAILED SKILLS PAGE HERE

Delete terms like, "Great leadership skills" and "Positive attitude".  This is referred to by employers as "fluff", meaning the listing of skills that you are already assumed to have and that most everyone puts on their resume, adding no real value.


You may also list skills acquired through community service, religious activities, volunteering, activism, etc. Do not leave something off this list because you feel it does not apply to the position you are applying for, employers look for multi-talented candidates.

EXAMPLE SKILLS LIST #1:

Financial Planning
Technology Cultured
Fluent in German
Mac & PC Fluency
SAP Proficiency
Adobe Photoshop
Leadership & Management
Strategy Development
Project Management
Marketing & Sales
Professional Writing
Spanish & German speaking
Investing
Report Production
Stock Market Investing
Public Speaking
Actuarial Knowledge
Statistics
Photography & Fine Art skills
Creativity
Interpersonal Abilities
Budgeting
Data & Analytics
Small engine repair
Piano composition and performance

Don’t limit writing how much you feel you know about certain skills, using terms like: “Limited knowledge of” or “Some experience with”.  The employer determines level of knowledge.  If you try, you could under- or oversell your skills.  Keep it simple, list your skills in basic, general terms.

EXAMPLE SKILLS LIST #2:

Entrepreneur
Persuasion
Decision-making
Teachable
Self-Motivating
Social
Accounting
Financing
Computer Literate
Purchasing
Self-Employed
Seasoned Traveler
Presenter
Bookkeeping
Data Management
Sales
Phone Skills
Negotiation
Critical Thinking
Memory/Retention
Scheduling
Budget Management
Inventing
Fundraising
Promotions
Researching Management

INVOLVEMENT:

AFFILIATIONS, PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT...

This section is where you could list organizations, groups, professional development networks, etc. where a connection might be made with an employer.  Some examples include:

  • American Marketing Association (AMA)
  • International Business Association (IBA)
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • American Society of Women Accountants (ASWA)
  • Beta Alpha Psi
  • Business Professionals of America (BPA)
  • Church affiliations and leadership
  • Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO)
  • BGSU Student Organizations
  • The American Finance Association (AFA)
  • Boy Scouts of America
  • The Graphic Professionals Resource Network
  • American Red Cross
  • Volunteer organizations      

Be sure to keep the same formatting used in other sections (your EXPERIENCE section, for example). 

Employers view this section as VERY important.  It tells them you care for than the status-quo.  You’re involved in more that just school and work, and you want to make a difference.  That passion will help get you hired, if you tell them about it.  Here’s some formatting and practical examples:

** THE FORMATTING (text listing order, lines, etc.) BELOW IS ONLY AN EXAMPLE - THE ORDER AND STYLE CAN VARY FROM THIS, JUST AS LONG AS YOURS ALL MATCH THROUGHOUT YOUR RESUME - ORGANIZATION SHOWS YOU CAN WRITE AND COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY, WHICH ALL EMPLOYERS ARE LOOKING FOR **

ORGANIZATION NAME, Role/Title, City, ST                                                          Dates

> Mission, purpose, your role, philanthropy, skills gained, events, partnerships, etc…

> E.g. Helped Make-A-Wish Foundation raise $2,000 selling 50/50 tickets at football game

ORGANIZATION NAME, Role/Title, City, ST                                                          Dates

> Mission, purpose, your role, philanthropy, skills gained, events, partnerships, etc…

> E.g. Volunteered accounting services, processing 50 tax returns in 1 week for less fortunate

ORGANIZATION NAME, Role/Title, City, ST                                                          Dates

> Mission, purpose, your role, philanthropy, skills gained, events, partnerships, etc…

> E.g. Use mission statement of organization to highlight your involvement


This section can also list experiences, activities, or community groups, or one-time event involvement.  Some might include, but are not limited to:

  • Theater, Music & Arts
  • Athletics
  • Religious/Spiritual
  • Robotics
  • Journalism
  • Drama
  • Competitions
  • Model Court, UN, etc.
  • Student Government

HONORS, ACCOMPLISHMENTS & AWARDS...

Be sure to explain WHAT you were awarded, and how/why (criteria) you received this award.  Explain why it would matter to a potential employer.  What skills have you gained that are useful to them?

  • If a scholarship, how much did you receive?
  • Did you win this award out of 10 or 2,000 other applicants?
  • What's the reputation of this accomplishment?  Does it mean anything?
  • Is this achievable by anyone, or very difficult?
  • Was the application and selection process complicated or in stages?

Some categorical examples might include, but are not limited to:

  • Scholarships
  • Athletics
  • Academic awards
  • Extracurricular

> Criteria to obtain. Volume of competition. Skills learned. Etc. Use #’s when possible

> E.g. Ranked 3rd out of 270 competitors in sales competition, selling data analytics technology

REFERENCES

(Always a separate document - only provided when asked for by employer)

  1. List your references on a separate document, not on your resume.  Use the space on your resume to list your attributes and skills, not your references. 
  2. Your references should be given to an employer only if they ask, not before. 
  3. Listing 3 references is typical, however, be sure to provide the employer the exact number they request.

REFERENCE PAGE FORMAT:

  1. Start with a new document.
  2. Copy/paste your name/contact information from your resume.
  3. List your references below, using same information found on a typical business card.

Separate document, example below:

ResumeRefExample