BGP Course Descriptions, Fall 2021

COURSELIST FOR STUDENTS WHO WERE ADMITTED TO BGSU IN FALL 2015 OR THEREAFTER

COMM 1020 Introduction to Public Speaking
Basic principles of public speaking. Focuses on informative and persuasive speaking in both extemporaneous and impromptu styles. Emphasizes adapting to diverse audiences, reducing communication apprehension, presenting in varied contexts, and using technology effectively.

WRIT 1110 Seminar in Academic Writing
Fall, Spring, Summer. Provides a theoretical and practical foundation for college writers and lays important groundwork for future academic reading and writing experiences. This workshop-based course explores diverse intellectual practices associated with effective writing, including analyzing and producing genres, investigating individual writing processes, and reflecting on one's learning with an eye toward transferring writing knowledge to new situations. Students explore and experience how writing works in worlds they inhabit by composing digital, visual, narrative expository arguments. UWP Placement. ABC/No credit.

WRIT 1120 Seminar in Research Writing
Fall, Spring, Summer. Builds on foundational understandings of academic reading and writing with a focus on inquiry-based writing. By engaging a range of writing tasks, both informal and formal, students pursue person- and library-based research writing that has meaning to them personally. Students also continue to build confidence as readers, writers, and critical thinkers, adding their voices to ongoing conversations. Using a workshop approach, students practice strategies for representing, through reflective writing, their research and composing processes to a range of audiences. ePortfolio based. Placement through UWP online prescreening
or prior credit for WRIT 1110. Graded ABC/No Credit.

BA 1600 Business Analytics I: Quantitative Analysis for Business Application I
Functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, differentiation techniques, business applications. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1220, MATH 1280 or MATH 1300 or two years of high school algebra and one of geometry and ACT math subscore of 22 or above. Credit not given for both BA 1600 and MATH 1260 or MATH 1310 or MATH 1340.

BA 1700 Business Analytics II: Quantitative Analysis for Business Application II
Antiderivatives, the fundamental theorem, techniques of integration, probability, random variables; discrete probability distributions; continuous probability distributions, expected value, bayes rule. Prerequisite: C or better in BA 1600. Credit not given for both BA 1700 and MATH 1260 or MATH 1310 or MATH 1340.

BA 2110 Business Analytics III: Descriptive Analytics
Fall, Spring, Summer. Elementary probability, random variables, probability distributions, sampling, descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: C or better in BA 1700 or equivalent. Credit not given for both BA 2110 and MATH 2470. Approved for distance education.

BA 2120 Predictive Analytics
Estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, correlation, regression, and forecasting. Prerequisite: C or better in BA 2110 or equivalent. Approved for distance education.

MATH 1150 Introduction to Statistics
Fall, Spring, Summer. Description of data, binomial and normal distributions, estimation and testing hypotheses for means and  proportions. Prerequisites: Two years high school algebra, one year of geometry and a satisfactory placement exam score. [Approved for distance education]

MATH 1220 College Algebra (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Review of functions and their graphs, linear and quadratic functions, factoring. Polynomial and rational functions. Review of exponents. Exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Systems of equations, theory of equations. Course meets for 4 hours per week. Not open to students with a grade of C or higher in MATH 1200, MATH 1280, or MATH 1300. Math Emporium Course Fee.

MATH 1230 Mathematics for Architecture and Construction (5)
Fall, Spring. Units and unit conversions; geometry; trigonometry of angles; laws of cosines and sines; solving triangles; vectors; analytic geometry; conceptual introduction to differential and integral calculus. This course is specifically designed to prepare students for required courses in the Architecture and Construction Management programs. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1200 or MATH 1220, or satisfactory placement exam score.

MATH 1260 Basic Calculus (5)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential and integral calculus, multivariate differential calculus and matrix theory; applications. Not open to students with a grade of C or higher in MATH 1310 or MATH 1350. Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MATH 1200, MATH 1220, MATH 1280, or MATH 1300; or two years of high school algebra and one of geometry AND a satisfactory placement exam score.

MATH 1280 Precalculus Mathematics (5)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic algebra; inequalities; functions and graphs; logarithmic and exponential functions; trigonometric functions and identities; applications and other topics. Not to be taken if credit for MATH 1290 or MATH 1300 has been received. Only earns 3 hours of credit toward graduation if credit for MATH 1200 or MATH 1220 has been received. Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and one of geometry AND a satisfactory placement exam score, or grade of C or higher in MATH 1200 or MATH 1220.

MATH 1310 Calculus and Analytic Geometry (5)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential and integral calculus including applications. The MATH 1310-2320-2330 sequence is a traditional calculus course for well-prepared students and is prerequisite for all advanced mathematics and statistics courses. Prerequisites: (1) two years of high school algebra, one year of geometry, one-half year of trigonometry, ACT math score of 24 or higher and satisfactory score on department placement test; or (2) grade of C or higher in MATH

1280, MATH 1290 or MATH 1300.
MATH 1340 Calculus and Analytic Geometry IA Fall, Spring. Limits, the derivative, differentiation techniques and applications of the derivative. MATH 1340 and MATH 1350 is a two-semester sequence which includes all the topics from MATH 1310. Not open to students with a grade of C or higher in MATH 1310 or MATH 1260. Prerequisites: same as MATH 1310.

MATH 1350 Calculus and Analytic Geometry IB
Fall, Spring, Summer. The definite integral; the fundamental theorem; indefinite integrals; integration by parts, by substitution and using tables; and applications of definite and indefinite integrals. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 1340.


POLS 2900 Statistics and Research Methods
Fall, Spring. Research design, methods of inquiry, and basic statistics used by political scientists; how political scientists establish and evaluate concepts and theories. Required of all POLS majors; should be taken by the end of the junior year.

PSYC 2700 Quantitative Methods I (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Principles of measurement. Quantitative analyses of behavioral measures, including measures of typicality, individual differences, correlational methods and tests of significance. Three lectures hours; two laboratory hours. Prerequisites: PSYC 1010 and MATH 1200 or MATH 1220 (or their equivalents) or consent of instructor.

SOC 2690 Introductory Statistics
Fall, Spring. Provides an introduction to core statistics concepts and techniques which are the bedrock of the social and behavioral sciences. Students will learn about the mathematical modeling of human behavior, including techniques for describing the characteristics of a sample, for stating and testing simple and complex hypotheses, and for modeling cause-effect relationships.

STAT 2000 Using Statistics
Descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, contingency tables. Interpretation and misinterpretation of statistical techniques. Does not count toward BSBA degree.

ACS 2000 Introduction to American Culture Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer. Regional, ethnic and economic aspects of American national experience as reflected in verbal, visual and material artifacts. Culture theory and models used to examine selected topics and problems. Required of all American Culture Studies majors. [Approved for distance education]

** ACS 2500 Cultural Pluralism in the United States
Fall, Spring, Summer. Interdisciplinary exploration of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation in the United States, emphasizing imaginative expressive forms, such as fiction, poetry, film and the visual arts. [Approved for distance education]

* ARCH 2330 History of Architecture I
Fall. Ancient and medieval Western architecture and traditional non-Western architecture in cultural, aesthetic, and technical aspects. Prerequisite: none.

* ARCH 2340 History of Architecture II
Spring. Western architecture from renaissance to present and recent developments in global architecture in cultural, aesthetic, and technical aspects. May be taken before ARCH 2330. Prerequisite: none. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts and International Perspective requirements.

ART 1010 Introduction to Art
Fall, Spring, Summer. Historical and aesthetic components of art with laboratory or online experiences with basic elements of creative expression. Nonmajors only. Two hours studio, two hours lecture. Extra fee. [Approved for distance education]

* ARTH 1450 Western Art I
Fall, Spring. Ancient and Medieval art. [Approved for distance education]

* ARTH 1460 Western Art II
Fall, Spring. Art from Renaissance to present. May be taken before ARTH 1450. [Approved for distance education]

* ARTH 2700 Survey of World Art
Alternate Fall. Survey of world arts and cultures, from Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Caribbean, and the Americas, including arts of various media and materials, and those created within selected religious practices and belief systems. Required for BA Art History majors. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and the Arts and International Perspective requirements.

AS 1100 Arts BG
Fall, Spring. An introduction to arts events at BGSU, including concerts, theatre productions, film, and gallery showings. Emphasis on understanding and valuing artistic performances as a personal as well as community experience. Attendance at weekly scheduled events required. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and the Arts requirement.

* CLCV 2410 Great Greek Minds
Fall, Summer. Masterpieces of Greek literature in English translation: Homer, Sappho, Pindar, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle. Introduction to history, art, customs, and beliefs. No Greek required. No credit for both CLCV 2410 and CLCV 4850. [Approved for distance education]

* CLCV 2420 Great Roman Minds
Spring. Masterpieces of Latin literature in English translation: Lucretius, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Petronius, Tacitus, Juvenal, Martial. An introduction to history, art, customs and beliefs. No Latin required. No credit for both CLCV 2420 and CLCV 4860. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts and International Perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

CLCV 3800 Classical Mythology
Spring. Study in English of Greek and Roman myths; historical meanings and influence on life, literature and art. No Latin required. [Approved for distance education]

ENG 1500 Response to Literature
Fall, Spring. A general education course emphasizing discussion of humanistic themes based on student responses to readings in fiction, drama, poetry and nonfiction. Not accepted toward English major or minor. Prerequisite: enrollment in or completion of GSW 1110. Approved for distance education.

ENG 2010 Introduction to Literature
Fall, Spring, Summer. Various thematic topics. Introduction to literary and textual study with attention to various forms of fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry, and to essential literary terminology and practice. Extensive expository writing. Prerequisite for most 3000- and 4000-level ENG courses. [Approved for distance education]

** ENG 2110 African American Literature
Spring. African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to the present in its historical, political, and cultural context. Germane critical approaches to both literary modes and vernacular tradition. Approved for distance education. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts and Cultural Diversity in the United States requirements. [Approved for distance education]

** ENG 2120 Native American Literature
Fall. Native American literature from the oral to the written tradition in its historical and cultural context. Germane critical approaches to the tales, songs, myths, memoirs, poetry and fiction.

* ENG 2610 World Literature from Ancient Times to 1700
Fall, Spring, Summer. Works in English and in translation of various world literatures from ancient times to 1700, including a balanced selection of texts from European and non-European cultures such as Greek, Celtic, Roman, Chinese, Indian, African, Japanese, Arabic, etc. [Approved for distance education]

* ENG 2620 World Literature from 1700 to Present
Fall, Spring, Summer. Works in English and in translation of various world literatures from 1700 to the present, including a balanced selection of texts from European and non-European cultures such as French, Russian, Spanish, Latin American, Chinese, Indian, African, Caribbean, Japanese, Arabic, etc. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and the Arts and International Perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

ENG 2640 British Literature to 1660
Fall, Spring, Summer. Survey of British prose, poetry, and drama from Anglo-Saxon origins through the restoration of Charles II; emphasis on literary traditions and historical contexts. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and the Arts requirement. [Approved for distance education]

ENG 2650 British Literature 1660-1945
Fall, Spring, Summer. Survey of British prose, poetry, and drama from the Restoration period through the Second World War; emphasis on literary traditions and historical contexts. Approved for distance education.

ENG 2740 American Literature Survey to 1865
Fall, Spring, Summer. American literature from its beginnings through the Civil War. May emphasize historical development and/or major themes. [Approved for distance education]

ENG 2750 American Literature 1865-1945
Fall, Spring, Summer. American literature from the end of the Civil War through World War II. May emphasize historical development and/or major themes. Approved for distance education. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts requirement. [Approved for distance education]

* ETHN/ROCS 2200 Introduction to African Literature
Fall. Creative and Critical writing in the English language by writers of African descent. Also writers of the Caribbean. Credit allowed for only one of ROCS

2200 or ETHN 2200
* FREN 2010 Intermediate French I
Fall, Spring. Grammar review; development of the four skills. Three class periods and laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: FREN 1020 or two years of French in high school.

* FREN 2020 Intermediate French II
Fall, Spring. A communicative approach to intermediate language using the four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, along with French and Francophone culture. Prerequisite: FREN 2010 or three years of high school French.

* FREN 2220 French Culture
Fall and/or Spring. An introduction to the cultural, social, intellectual, and artistic life of French-speaking peoples from the perspective of French-American relations and intercultural comparisons and using readings, film, music, and other media. Readings and class in English. Does not fulfill language requirements or count toward the major or minor in French.

* GERM 2150 German Culture and Civilization
Cultural-historical treatment of the social, intellectual and artistic life of the German-speaking peoples from medieval times to World War II. Lectures, audiovisual presentations and readings in English. Approved for distance education.

* GERM 2160 Contemporary Germany
Lecture-reading course in English. Division of Germany after World War II; rebuilding and development of the two German states since 1949; political, economic and social systems, inter-German relations, patterns of daily living; revolution in East Germany and process of unification. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) humanities and the arts and international perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

HNRS 2020 Critical Thinking about Great Ideas
Spring. Interdisciplinary seminar on some of the influential ideas of human culture. Emphasis on reading of primary texts and the application of critical thinking to the evaluation of these ideas. In addition, the integration and synthesis of relationships between ideas will be stressed and organized around different ontological assumptions. Prerequisite: HNRS 2010 and admission to the BGSU Honors Program.

** ITAL 2620 Italian-American Experience: Mafia, Migration, and the Movies
Fall or Spring. Identifies and explore cross-cultural and transnational stereotypes of the phenomenon of the Italian Mafia in America and Italy. In English. Approved for distance education.

MUCT 1010 Exploring Music
Fall, Spring, Summer. Explores different categories of music (classical, world, popular) and various genres in their social contexts. Topics include, but are not limited to: music and ethnicity, music and gender, music and spirituality, music and love. Directed listening focuses on how musical sounds create meaning in different historical periods and cultures. [Approved for distance education]

* MUCT 1250 Exploring Music of World Cultures
Fall, Spring, Summer. Musical systems of major non-Western art musics: Africa, Near East, Pacific and Asia. Theoretical, analytical and cultural concepts related to music. Not open to bachelor of music degree students, except for those in the world music program. [Approved for distance education]

MUCT 2220 Turning Points: Arts and Humanities in Context
Spring. Explores the convergence of politics, history, religion, and the arts during four significant turning points in world history. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) humanities and the arts requirement.

MUCT 2610 Music History I
Fall. Study of the history, social setting and style of Western art music in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods (ca. 800-1750).

PHIL 1010 Introduction to Philosophy
Fall, Spring, Summer. What makes you, you? Why do bad things happen to good people? Can you really trust what you see? Can we be certain that God exists? What makes us responsible for the things we do? What are the limits of what we can know? What makes life worth living? In this course, you will critically discuss and debate these kinds of questions that have puzzled us for thousands of years and enrich our understanding of ourselves and our place in the world. [Approved for distance education]

PHIL 1020 Introduction to Ethics
Fall, Spring, Summer. Where does morality come from? Is morality just a matter of opinion? What makes an action right or wrong? What does it mean to be a good person? Are there some things it's never okay to do? In this course, we will grapple with these and other central theoretical questions in ethics. [Approved for distance education]

PHIL 1030 Introduction to Logic
Fall, Spring. Basic concepts of logic; how to distinguish arguments from non-arguments, premises from conclusions. Methods for evaluating arguments and how to recognize typical mistakes in reasoning. Approved for distance education.

PHIL 1250 Contemporary Moral Issues
Fall, Spring, Summer. We will explore real-world moral challenges that we currently face as individuals and as a society. Do you have a right to privacy on the internet? Should same-sex marriage be legal? Can terrorism ever be justified? Is it morally acceptable to modify your body to make you stronger, faster, or smarter? The primary focus of this course is to enrich our understanding of such questions by increasing our knowledge of both the relevant facts and the values at issue. Approved for distance education.
Fall, Spring. Is global warming our problem? If so, what should we do about it? Are trees more important than jobs? What is so bad about genetically modified organisms? Is meat murder? Are tree-huggers terrorists? In this course, we will attempt to grapple with these sorts of questions by investigating the proper relationship between human beings and the environment, from a variety of distinct cultural perspectives. [Approved for distance education]

PHIL 2420 Medical Ethics
Fall, Spring, Summer. From birth to death, medical and healthcare practices are an intimate part of our lives. This course explores central questions in these practices, such as: Is it ever okay to get an abortion? Should physicians ever assist patients in ending their lives? Is genetic manipulation 'playing God'? Do we have a right to healthcare? Is it ever right to lie to a patient? Should we ever use the results of unethical research? [Approved for distance education]

POPC 1600 Introduction to Popular Culture
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic theories and approaches to the scholarly study of popular culture, including various media, folklore, and everyday life. [Approved for distance education]

POPC 1650 Popular Culture and Media
Fall, Spring, Summer. Some of the ways in which mass media (TV, film, recording industry, print, radio) have affected modern American culture. Media relationships and interactions. [Approved for distance education]

** POPC 1700 Black Popular Culture
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic theories of approaches to 20th century African-American popular culture. Traces ways black popular culture has shaped and is shaped by American society. Examines relationship of race, ethnicity, gender and class. [Approved for distance education]

POPC 2200 Introduction to Folklore & Folklife
Fall, Spring. Study and collecting of folklore; ballads, myths, tall tales, heroes, folk medicines, superstitions, proverbs and crafts. [Approved for distance education]

* ROCS/ETHN 2200 Introduction to African Literature
Fall. Creative and Critical writing in the English language by writers of African descent. Also writers of the Caribbean. Credit allowed for only one of ROCS 2200 or ETHN 2200.

* RUSN 2150 Russian Culture
Russian culture and its manifestations in arts, family and social life, folkways, religion, and other areas. Presentations, readings, and writing in English. Approved for distance education.

* RUSN 2160 Post-Communist Russia
Russian society and cultural values as reflected in such aspects of life as the arts, education, work, recreation, politics, family life, and religion. Cross-cultural approach. Presentations, readings, and writing in English. International perspectives course. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) humanities and arts and international perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

SPAN 2010 Intermediate Spanish I
Fall, Spring. Communicative approach to teach intermediate language use in the four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, writing (emphasis on composition). Reading and discussion in Spanish of cultural readings. Three classroom hours and one-hour scheduled laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: SPAN 1020 or two years of Spanish in high school.

* SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II
Fall, Spring. SPAN 2010 continued. Three classroom hours and one-hour scheduled laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or three years of Spanish in high school.

* SPAN 2030 Intermediate Spanish for the Professions
Fall, Spring. Alternative to SPAN 2020 or 2120 that includes specialized vocabulary and communicative practice for professional use; may focus on medical, legal, or business uses. Three classroom hours. Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or three years of Spanish in high school. Applicable to the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement.

* SPAN 2700 Hispanic Culture
Introduction to the cultural, social, intellectual, and artistic life of Latin America and/or Spain from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Presentations, readings, and writing in English. Approved for distance education.

THFM 1410 The Theatre Experience
Fall, Spring, Summer. Art of theatre; heritage and contemporary values as humanistic discipline; importance as social/cultural experience; opportunity for some involvement in theatrical activities. Laboratory hours required.

THFM 1610 Introduction to Film
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduces students to the critical study of film as entertainment and art, as well as both a commercial and a cultural product. Provides students with an overview of the basic theories and methodologies used to study narrative, documentary and experimental films, and examines the medium of film within an aesthetic, social and industrial context. Using a combination of approaches to viewing, analyzing and writing about movies, this course also considers how films use various cinematic techniques to communicate meaning to viewers. Extra Fee. [Approved for distance education]

THFM 2020 Performance in Life & on Stage
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to Performance Studies through critical engagement of textual, cultural, and rhetorical approaches. Emphasis is on vocal and physical performance skills applied to various communicative contexts.

** THFM 2150 Exploring Cultural Diversity Through Performance
Fall, Spring. Through performance and discussion of selected public and private texts written by American minority writers, this course explores what it means to be a part of a culturally diverse society.

* WS 2000 Introduction to Women's Studies: Perspectives on Gender, Class, and Ethnicity
Fall, Spring, Summer. Interdisciplinary survey of the new scholarship on women. Emphasis on the interconnectedness of gender, class and ethnicity in women's experiences and viewpoints. [Approved for distance education]

* AFRS 2000 – Introduction to Africana Studies
Fall, Spring, and Summer. Regular and online course introducing students to the interdisciplinary methodology, crosscultural perspectives, literary genres,
and critical-analysis skills needed to study peoples of African descent. Focus is on the arts and humanities. [Approved for distance education]

* ASIA/HIST 1800 Asian Civilizations
Fall, Spring. This is a core course for all Asian Studies majors and minors. Provides general knowledge of Asia relative to historical, cultural, social, economic, and political developments of selected countries in East, South, or Southeast Asia. Credit allowed for only one of ASIA 1800, HIST 1800. [Approved for distance education]

* ASIA 2000 – Introduction to Asian Religions
Fall or Spring. This course provides an introduction to Asian Religions. It looks at some of the sacred texts, philosophies, and practices of religions either started in South, East, or Southeast Asia or practiced by large numbers of people there, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shintoism, Sikhism, Jainism, Taoism, and Confucianism. Students will leave the class with a sense of the diversity of "Asia" as well as an understanding that religions are not monolithic, but open to interpretation both by practitioners and by artists - musicians, dancers, painters, and writers.

* CAST 2010 Introduction to Canadian Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer on demand. Multidisciplinary review of Canadian development. Comparisons with the United States. Canada's history, geography, government and political system, population and social policy, economy and foreign trade, literature, art, and popular culture. [Approved for distance education]

CDIS 1230 Introduction to Communication Disorders
Fall, Spring, Summer, and web-based during summer only. Normal speech and language development; description and etiology of various communication disorders including phonology, voice, stuttering, language and hearing. [Approved for distance education]

ECON 2000 Introduction to Economics
Fall, Spring. Alternative economic goals; economic growth, full employment, price stability, fair income distribution, economic security, economic freedom, consumer sovereignty, efficiency. Recommended for students taking only one ECON course. Does not count toward the total hours of economics required for BSBA, BS in economics, BA in economics, or minor in economics; cannot be used to satisfy specialization, non-business nor free elective requirements for BSBA degree. No credit for students who have credit for either ECON 2020 or ECON 2030.

ECON 2020 Principles of Microeconomics
Fall, Spring. Price and allocation of resources. Demand, supply; price theory; income distribution; market failure; current problems and public policy. Enhances students' ability to evaluate economic policy. Recommended before ECON 2030. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.

ECON 2030 Principles of Macroeconomics
Fall, Spring. National income and employment, inflation, banking system, monetary and fiscal policy; economic growth and development; international economics. Develops students' understanding of tradeoffs and enhances critical reasoning abilities. Prerequisite: ECON 2020 or with consent of department.

** EDFI 2980 School, Society, and Cultural Diversity
Critical interdisciplinary examination of schooling, society, and cultural diversity in the United States. Inquiry into the origins of contemporary ideas, issues, and problems through the disciplines of history and philosophy, and analysis grounded in the social sciences on the relationships between schooling, diversity, and institutional issues in a globalizing society. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) social and behavioral sciences and cultural diversity requirements.

** EIEC 2210 Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Early Childhood
Fall, Spring. Focus on theories, issues, trends, skills and strategies to prepare teacher candidates for working in educational settings with children and families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds to support educational involvement and achievement. Taken with EIEC 2220, 2230, & 2240. Prerequisite: C or higher in EDTL 2010 & EIEC 1110.

ENVS 1010 Introduction to Environmental Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer. Overview of environmental principles and concepts. Students consider contemporary environmental issues as they relate to the quality of life. Topics of environmental concern are used to develop skills in evaluation, analysis, and values clarification. Extra fee. [Approved for distance education]

** ETHN 1010 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Spring, Summer, Fall. This gateway course to the field of Ethnic Studies introduces students to interdisciplinary analyses of race and ethnicity in the U.S. It explores the social construction and ideologies of race in colonial conquest, slavery, and immigration, and the intersections of race with other hierarchies such as class, gender, and sexuality. Students cannot take ETHN 1010 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Ethnic Studies." Approved for distance education.

** ETHN 1100 Introduction to Latina/o Studies
Fall, Spring. Latina/o experience in the United States: cultures, life experiences, and the limited political, education, socio-economic opportunities of this minority. Students cannot take ETHN 1100 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Latina/o Studies."

** ETHN 1200 Introduction to African American Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer. An introduction to the history of black studies, tracing it from its origins in the social, cultural, and political struggles for human and civil rights to the various intellectual currents which have defined the field as a discipline. It places special emphasis on the United States but also considers key authors, historical figures, and social movements from the black Diaspora. Students cannot take ETHN 1200 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to African American Studies."

** ETHN 1300 Introduction to Asian American Studies
Fall, Spring. Similarities and differences of the various components of the Asian American category with reference to their individual histories and collective situation from the 19th century to the present. Students cannot take ETHN 1300 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topics "Introduction to Asian American Studies."

** ETHN 1600 Introduction to Native American Studies
Fall, Spring. An interdisciplinary examination of the Native American Diaspora in the context of European discovery and conquest. A general overview and comparative analysis of the diverse native people and cultures of North America, effects of colonialism and U.S. policy on Native American communities, federal Indian law and policy, and cultural negotiation. Students cannot take ETHN 1600 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Native American Studies."

** ETHN 2010 Ethnicity and Social Movements
Fall or Spring. The nature, causes, and consequences of those social movements born out of the diasporan histories and experiences of racial and ethnic peoples/communities in the United States. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Social and Behavioral Sciences and Cultural Diversity in the United States requirements.

** ETHN 2600 Contemporary Issues in Native America
Fall, Spring. Examines salient issues of interest to contemporary Native American people and communities. Selected topics may include federal Indian law and policy, assimilation, identity politics, Indian activism, natural resources, Native spirituality, economic development, tribal governance, sovereignty, decolonization and global indigeneity.

* GEOG 1210 World Geography: Eurasia & Africa
Fall, Spring. Geographical analysis of variations and interrelationships of physical, cultural, economic, political, and population factors across the earth's surface. Focus on Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Asia. [Approved for distance education]

* GEOG 1220 World Geography: Americas and the Pacific
Fall, Spring. Geographical analysis of variations and interrelationships of physical, cultural, economic, political, and population factors across the earth's surface. Focus on North America, Latin America, Australia-New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands. [Approved for distance education]

GEOG 2300 Cultural Geography
Fall, Spring. Geographic influences upon human activities on the earth's surface. Cultural processes and global patterns of religion, language, education, technology, diet, health, resource use, political organization, economic activity, social organization, settlement, and population. [Approved for distance education]

* GEOG 2630 The Rising Dragon: China’s Global Reach
Fall, Summer. This course is a comprehensive survey of contemporary China. It traces the changes occurring in this nation across both space and time. Beginning with China's diverse natural environments and continuing through its recent past, it presents contemporary China as a product of both past and present internal and external forces. Current and future successes and challenges will be discussed by placing China in context as a massive, yet still developing, nation that must meet the needs of its 1.3 billion plus citizens while becoming a major regional and global power. Approved for distance education.

GERO 1010 Aging, the Individual and Society
Fall, Spring, Summer. Study of aging from a multidisciplinary perspective; focus on the way people are thought about, evaluated and treated on the basis of their age. Approved for distance education.

HDFS 1930 Lifespan Human Development
Fall, Spring, Summer. Human developmental theories. Examination of environmental and contextual factors that influence development from birth through the life course, using life-history research, surveys, and questionnaires. May not receive credit for both HDFS 1050 and HDFS 1930. Approved for distance education.

HDFS 2020 Contemporary Marriages and Families
Fall, Spring, Summer. Analysis of trends in marriage and family relationships in contemporary society including family processes throughout life cycle. Course addresses diversity in the marriage and family experience, the dynamic nature of family systems, and the ways in which families are impacted by the broader social, political, and cultural context. Approved for distance education.

* HIST 1510 World Civilizations
Fall, Spring, Summer. Comparative study of how and why economic, social, political and intellectual factors shaped and defined the history of selected Western and non-Western civilizations in the ancient and medieval periods. [Approved for distance education]

* HIST 1520 Modern World
Fall, Spring, Summer. Comparative study of how and why selected economic, social, political and intellectual revolutions of the modern world have transformed and are shaping contemporary European and non-Western cultures. Approved for distance education.

* HIST/ASIA 1800 Asian Civilizations
Fall, Spring. Interdisciplinary study of Asian civilizations, such as China, Japan, Korea and India; emphasis on how and why socio-economic, political and intellectual developments shaped traditional cultures of Asia and transformed modern Asia into the fastest-growing region of the world. Credit allowed for only one of ASIA 1800, HIST 1800. [Approved for distance education]

** HIST 2050 Early America
Fall, Spring, Summer. Selected constitutional, intellectual, political and social developments that defined and shaped America between its first European settlement and the end of Reconstruction. [Approved for distance education]

HIST 2060 Modern America
Fall, Spring, Summer. How and why selected economic, intellectual, political and social developments transformed post-Civil War America and shaped 20th century American society. [Approved for distance education]

HNRS 2010 Introduction to Critical Thinking
Fall. Interdisciplinary inquiry in social sciences. Analysis of arguments through assumptions, ambiguity, data and fallacies; formulation of conclusions and alternative inferences; value assumptions and decision making. Prerequisite: admission to the honors program or permission of honors director.

* INST 2000 Introduction to International Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer. This introduction to the International Studies major provides an interdisciplinary overview of the processes and effects of globalization. Major themes include population and migration (demographics), the role of women, environmental change, economic and political issues. [Approved for distance education]

MDIA 1030 Media and the Information Society
Fall, Spring. Social trends as influenced by technology in the information society. Social policy and effects involving information technologies and information services. Examples from the telephone, computer, print, film, television, cable, radio, and satellite systems. No credit for both JOUR 1000 and MDIA 1030. Open to nonmajors.

MDIA 3520 Online Social Media
On demand. This course examines applications and implications of online social media. Social psychological perspectives of online social media will be primarily examined, but the subjects of discussions and readings are not limited to those perspectives. Approved for distance education.

POLS 1100 American Government: Processes and Structure
Fall, Spring, Summer. Constitutional basis and development, political processes (parties, nominations and elections, interest groups and public opinion), federalism and institutions of national government. Approved for distance education.

* POLS 1710 Introduction to Comparative Government
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic concepts, approaches to and comparisons of different political systems, including political cultures, participation, interest groups, institutions and processes; essential tools and methods for the study of political systems in the world. Approved for distance education.

* POLS 1720 Introduction to International Relations
Fall, Spring, Summer. Historical and contemporary overview of the modern international system; governmental and nongovernmental actors influencing international relations; major issues of the post-cold-war period. Approved for distance education.

PSYC 1010 General Psychology (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Scientific approaches to the study of behavior of organisms. Application to personal and social behavior. [Approved for distance education]

SOC 1010 Principles of Sociology
Fall, Spring, Summer. Scientific study of social structure, interaction, and institutions. Topics include gender, race, class, family, culture, and crime. [Approved for distance education]

SOC 2020 Social Problems
Fall, Spring, Summer. Application of sociological concepts and theories to understand the social causes of problems such as poverty, war, and global warming, and why some problems seem more important to us than others. Problems are examined sociologically with an eye toward possible solutions. [Approved for distance education]

SOC 2120 Population and Society
Fall, Spring. Population growth and distribution. Domestic and international perspectives on migration, fertility (births), and mortality (deaths). Approved for distance education.

** SOC 2160 Minority Groups
Fall, Spring, Summer. Analysis of privilege and oppression and how they were created and are maintained at the institutional level as well as how they are experienced at the interpersonal and individual levels in the U.S. [Approved for distance education]

SOC 2310 Cultural Anthropology
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the study of culture. Examines cultural variation in social organization, cultural values, and subsistence, and the differential impact of globalization. [Approved for distance education]

* TECH 3020 Technology Systems in Societies
Current issues and their relationship to technology and systems in various cultures throughout the world; emphasis on explaining technological behaviors, and on showing how technology permeates all human affairs. Two one-and-one-half-hour lectures per week. Prerequisite: junior status or consent of instructor. [Approved for distance education]

Courses without Labs

ASTR 2010 Modern Astronomy
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to the physical universe, including most or all of: motions in the sky, gravity, radiation, the Sun, the nature and evolution of stars, neutron stars and black holes, the Milky Way galaxy, galaxies, active galactic nuclei, the structure and evolution of the universe, and the search for extraterrestrial life. Some observational work. Extra fee. Approved for distance education.

ASTR 2120 The Solar System
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to planetary and space science, including most or all of: motions in the sky, the history of astronomy, the moon, solar/terrestrial relations, planetary structure and atmospheres, comets, asteroids, meteoroids, space exploration, and the origin of the solar system. Some observational work. Extra fee.

BIOL 1080 Life in the Sea
Fall. Shore and ocean environments, variety and adaptations of marine life. Observations of marine organisms in marine laboratory. Three one-hour lectures. High school biology recommended. Not accepted toward biology major or minor. [Approved for distance education]

CHEM 1000 Introduction to Chemistry
Fall, Spring, Summer. Examination of basic chemical concepts and role of chemistry in modern society. For students not majoring in sciences. Not counted toward chemistry major or minor. Approved for distance education.

GEOG 1250 Weather and Climate
Fall, Spring. Atmospheric elements and controls; earth-sun relationships, weather components, weather prediction, and climatic types and distribution. Two one-hour lectures, one-hour demonstration-discussion. [Approved for distance education]

GEOL 1000 Introduction to Geology
Fall, Spring, Summer. The earth; physical and historical geology; including economic, social and environmental aspects. Not open to geology majors and minors. Credit allowed for no more than one: GEOL 1000, GEOL 1010, GEOL 1040, GEOL 1940Q. Approved for distance education.

SEES 2220 Water Resources and Issues
Spring. Introduction to scientific issues affecting the world's fresh water supply with an emphasis on water use, water quality, conflict, and environmental and social sustainability in Ohio, the US and the world.

Courses with Labs

ASTR 1010 Experimental Astronomy
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to the properties of planets, stars, and galaxies; how they are distributed; and how they move within the universe. Students actively experiment in the lab, online, and outdoors to understand how astronomers gather information about these objects, and to appreciate the observational uncertainties in such measurements. Includes two hours per week of laboratory and observational work. No prerequisites.

BIOL 1010 Environment of Life
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic ecology and current environmental problems of air, water and land pollution; human reproduction and population dynamics. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Not accepted toward biology major or minor. Credit not given for more than one of ENVH 1050 and BIOL 1010. Extra fee. [Approved for distance education]

BIOL 1040 Introduction to Biology (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic concepts: the cell, metabolism, genetics, reproduction, development, evolution, ecology. Three one-hour lectures, one two-hour laboratory. Not accepted toward biology major or minor. Extra fee.

BIOL 2040 Concepts in Biology I (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer on demand. Introduction to ecological and evolutionary biology, Mendelian and population genetics, and the major groups of plants, animals and microbes. Three one-hour lectures, one three-hour lab and one two-hour recitation. Field trips required. Extra fee.

BIOL 2050 Concepts in Biology II (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer on demand. Introduction to molecular and cellular biology, physiology and organ systems. Three one-hour lectures, one three-hour lab and one one-hour recitation. Extra fee.

CHEM 1090/1100 Elementary Chemistry (3/1)
Fall, Spring, Summer. General chemistry and introduction to organic chemistry. Not accepted toward chemistry major or minor. Three lectures. Corequisite: CHEM 1100. Prerequisites: two years of high school science and high school algebra or its equivalent.

CHEM 1230 General Chemistry I (4) / 1240 General Chemistry Laboratory (1)
CHEM 1230: Fall, Spring, Summer. The first in a two-course sequence for science majors and students in other science-related programs. Topics include atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, common classes of chemical reactions, stoichiometric calculations, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Both conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills are emphasized. Three lectures, one recitation. Prerequisite: MATH 1200 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1260 or MATH 1280 or MATH 1300 or MATH 1310 or MATH 1340 or Math placement score of 41 or higher. High school chemistry is recommended.
Corequisite: CHEM 1240.

CHEM 1240: Fall, Spring, Summer. Laboratory course taken in conjunction with CHEM 1230. One three-hour lab period per week. Corequisite: CHEM 1230.

CHEM 1350 General Chemistry (5)
Fall. The first in a two-course sequence for well-prepared chemistry majors, science majors, and students in other science-related programs. Topics include atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, common classes of chemical reactions, stoichiometric calculations, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Both conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills are emphasized. Three lectures, one recitation, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: high school chemistry or CHEM 1090 and MATH 1220 or higher or Math placement score of 41 or higher. Extra fee.

FN 2070/2080 Introduction to Human Nutrition (3) / Introduction to Human Nutrition Laboratory (1)
FN 2070: Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic concepts and principles in the science of human nutrition, energy balance and weight control, individual nutrient needs, diet selection, nutrition related metabolism and physiological functions, nutritional diseases, and current human nutrition controversies. [Approved for distance education]

FN 2080: Fall, Spring, Summer. A laboratory course taken in conjunction with FN 2070. One two-hour lab period. Approved for distance education. Corequisite: FN 2070.

GEOG 1260 Weather Studies Laboratory
Introduction to meteorology including characteristics of the atmosphere, drivers of atmospheric motion, meteorological phenomena and tools used to measure the atmosphere. Students learn about meteorological data and actively apply it in a lab setting to develop an understanding of a range of atmospheric characteristics and phenomena, an appreciation of weather prediction uncertainties and an awareness of the warning systems used to notify the public about severe weather events. Approved for distance education. Credit cannot be earned for both GEOG 1250 and GEOG 1260.

GEOL 1040 Earth Environments (4)
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to the science of geology. Relationship of man to physical environment of the earth and its natural resources. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Credit allowed for no more than one: GEOL 1000, GEOL 1010, GEOL 1040, GEOL 1940Q. Extra fee. Approved for distance education.

GEOL 1050 Life Through Time (4)
Introduction to the origin, evolution, and extinction of major fossil groups in relation to a changing Earth through time. Three lectures and one two-hour lab. Extra fee.

GEOL 2150 Geologic History of Dinosaurs
Spring. Evolution, ways of life and extinction of the Dinosauria; geologic history of vertebrates and dinosaurs in relation to a changing earth. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) natural sciences requirement. Extra fee.

PHYS 1010 Basic Physics
Spring. Laboratory course for non-science majors. Emphasis on scientific data analysis and the meaning of scientific knowledge. Not acceptable toward physics major or minor. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Extra fee.

PHYS 2010 College Physics I (5)
Fall, Spring, Summer. First term of an introductory physics sequence using algebra and trigonometry, but not calculus. Topics include motion, forces, energy, fluids, heat and simple harmonic motion. Four lecture-recitations and one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: satisfactory score on the math placement exam or a grade of C or higher in MATH 1120 or in MATH 1200 or above. Extra fee.

PHYS 2020 College Physics II (5)
Fall, Spring, Summer. PHYS 2010 continued. Wave motion, sound, electricity, magnetism, electrical measurements, optics; atomic, nuclear and solid-state physics. Four lecture-recitations and one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: PHYS 2010. Extra fee.

PHYS 2110 University Physics I (5)
Fall. Introductory calculus-based physics sequence for science and engineering majors. Kinematics in one, two and three dimensions; Newtonian mechanics; gravitation; heat and thermodynamics. Four lecture-recitations and one two-hour laboratory. Corequisite: MATH 1310. Extra fee.

PHYS 2120 University Physics II (5)
Spring. PHYS 2110 continued. Wave motion, sound, optics, electricity and magnetism. Four lecture-recitations and one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: PHYS 2110. Corequisite: MATH 2320. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) natural sciences requirement. Extra fee.

Cultural Diversity in the United States courses approved to also fulfill a Humanities and the Arts requirement

** ACS 2500 Cultural Pluralism in the United States
Fall, Spring, Summer. Interdisciplinary exploration of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation in the United States, emphasizing imaginative expressive forms, such as fiction, poetry, film and the visual arts. [Approved for distance education]

** ENG 2110 African American Literature
Spring. African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to the present in its historical, political, and cultural context. Germane critical approaches to both literary modes and vernacular tradition. Approved for distance education. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts and Cultural Diversity in the United States requirements. [Approved for distance education]

** ENG 2120 Native American Literature
Fall. Native American literature from the oral to the written tradition in its historical and cultural context. Germane critical approaches to the tales, songs, myths, memoirs, poetry and fiction.

** ITAL 2620 Italian-American Experience: Mafia, Migration, and the Movies
Fall or Spring. Identifies and explore cross-cultural and transnational stereotypes of the phenomenon of the Italian Mafia in America and Italy. In English. Approved for distance education.

** PHIL 2320 Environmental Ethics
Fall, Spring. Is global warming our problem? If so, what should we do about it? Are trees more important than jobs? What is so bad about genetically modified organisms? Is meat murder? Are tree-huggers terrorists? In this course, we will attempt to grapple with these sorts of questions by investigating the proper relationship between human beings and the environment, from a variety of distinct cultural perspectives. [Approved for distance education]

** POPC 1700 Black Popular Culture
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic theories of approaches to 20th century African-American popular culture. Traces ways black popular culture has shaped and is shaped by American society. Examines relationship of race, ethnicity, gender and class. [Approved for distance education]

** THFM 2150 Exploring Cultural Diversity Through Performance
Fall, Spring. Through performance and discussion of selected public and private texts written by American minority writers, this course explores what it means to be a part of a culturally diverse society.

** WS 2000 Introduction to Women's Studies: Perspectives on Gender, Class, and Ethnicity
Fall, Spring, Summer. Interdisciplinary survey of the new scholarship on women. Emphasis on the interconnectedness of gender, class and ethnicity in women's experiences and viewpoints. [Approved for distance education]

Cultural Diversity in the United States courses approved to also fulfill a Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement

** EDFI 2980 School, Society, and Cultural Diversity
Critical interdisciplinary examination of schooling, society, and cultural diversity in the United States. Inquiry into the origins of contemporary ideas, issues, and problems through the disciplines of history and philosophy, and analysis grounded in the social sciences on the relationships between schooling, diversity, and institutional issues in a globalizing society. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) social and behavioral sciences and cultural diversity requirements.

** EIEC 2210 Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Early Childhood
Fall, Spring. Focus on theories, issues, trends, skills and strategies to prepare teacher candidates for working in educational settings with children and families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds to support educational involvement and achievement. Taken with EIEC 2220, 2230, & 2240. Prerequisite: C or higher in EDTL 2010 & EIEC 1110.

** ETHN 1010 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Spring, Summer, Fall. This gateway course to the field of Ethnic Studies introduces students to interdisciplinary analyses of race and ethnicity in the U.S. It explores the social construction and ideologies of race in colonial conquest, slavery, and immigration, and the intersections of race with other hierarchies such as class, gender, and sexuality. Approved for Distance Education. Students cannot take ETHN 1010 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Ethnic Studies." [Approved for distance education]

** ETHN 1100 Introduction to Latina/o Studies
Fall, Spring. Latina/o experience in the United States: cultures, life experiences, and the limited political, education, socio-economic opportunities of this minority. Students cannot take ETHN 1100 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Latina/o Studies."

** ETHN 1200 Introduction to African American Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer. An introduction to the history of black studies, tracing it from its origins in the social, cultural, and political struggles for human and civil rights to the various intellectual currents which have defined the field as a discipline. It places special emphasis on the United States but also considers key authors, historical figures, and social movements from the black Diaspora. Students cannot take ETHN 1200 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to African American Studies."

** ETHN 1300 Introduction to Asian American Studies
Fall, Spring. Similarities and differences of the various components of the Asian American category with reference to their individual histories and collective situation from the 19th century to the present. Students cannot take ETHN 1300 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topics "Introduction to Asian American Studies."

** ETHN 1600 Introduction to Native American Studies
Fall, Spring. An interdisciplinary examination of the Native American Diaspora in the context of European discovery and conquest. A general overview and comparative analysis of the diverse native people and cultures of North America, effects of colonialism and U.S. policy on Native American communities, federal Indian law and policy, and cultural negotiation. Students cannot take ETHN 1600 and ETHN 1920 or 1930 on the topic "Introduction to Native American Studies."

** ETHN 2010 Ethnicity and Social Movements
Fall or Spring. The nature, causes, and consequences of those social movements born out of the diasporan histories and experiences of racial and ethnic peoples/communities in the United States. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Social and Behavioral Sciences and Cultural Diversity in the United States requirements.

** ETHN 2600 Contemporary Issues in Native America
Fall, Spring. Examines salient issues of interest to contemporary Native American people and communities. Selected topics may include federal Indian law and policy, assimilation, identity politics, Indian activism, natural resources, Native spirituality, economic development, tribal governance, sovereignty, decolonization and global indigeneity.

** HIST 2050 Early America
Fall, Spring, Summer. Selected constitutional, intellectual, political and social developments that defined and shaped America between its first European settlement and the end of Reconstruction. [Approved for distance education]

** SOC 2160 Minority Groups
Fall, Spring, Summer. Analysis of privilege and oppression and how they were created and are maintained at the institutional level as well as how they are experienced at the interpersonal and individual levels in the U.S. [Approved for distance education]

GERM 2010 Intermediate German I
Fall, Spring. Grammar review; development of the four skills. Three class periods and laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: GERM 1020 or two years of high school German, or by placement.

GERM 2020 Intermediate German II
Fall, Spring. GERM 2010 continued. Three class periods and laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: GERM 2010 or three years of high school German, or by placement.

International Perspective courses approved to also fulfill a Humanities and the Arts requirement

* ARCH 2330 History of Architecture I
Fall. Ancient and medieval Western architecture and traditional non-Western architecture in cultural, aesthetic, and technical aspects. Prerequisite: none.

* ARCH 2340 History of Architecture II
Spring. Western architecture from renaissance to present and recent developments in global architecture in cultural, aesthetic, and technical aspects. May be taken before ARCH 2330. Prerequisite: none. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts and International Perspective requirements.

* ARTH 1450 Western Art I
Fall, Spring. Ancient and Medieval art. [Approved for distance education]

* ARTH 1460 Western Art II
Fall, Spring. Art from Renaissance to present. May be taken before ARTH 1450. [Approved for distance education]

* ARTH 2700 Survey of World Art
Alternate Fall. Survey of world arts and cultures, from Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Caribbean, and the Americas, including arts of various media and materials, and those created within selected religious practices and belief systems. Required for BA Art History majors. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and the Arts and International Perspective requirements.

* CLCV 2410 Great Greek Minds*
Fall, Summer. Masterpieces of Greek literature in English translation: Homer, Sappho, Pindar, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle. Introduction to history, art, customs, and beliefs. No Greek required. No credit for both CLCV 2410 and CLCV 4850. [Approved for distance education]

* CLCV 2420 Great Roman Minds
Spring. Masterpieces of Latin literature in English translation: Lucretius, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Petronius, Tacitus, Juvenal, Martial. An introduction to history, art, customs and beliefs. No Latin required. No credit for both CLCV 2420 and CLCV 4860. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and Arts and International Perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

ENG 2610 World Literature from Ancient Times to 1700
Fall, Spring, Summer. Works in English and in translation of various world literatures from ancient times to 1700, including a balanced selection of texts from European and non-European cultures such as Greek, Celtic, Roman, Chinese, Indian, African, Japanese, Arabic, etc. [Approved for distance education]

* ENG 2620 World Literature from 1700 to Present
Fall, Spring, Summer. Works in English and in translation of various world literatures from 1700 to the present, including a balanced selection of texts from European and non-European cultures such as French, Russian, Spanish, Latin American, Chinese, Indian, African, Caribbean, Japanese, Arabic, etc. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) Humanities and the Arts and International Perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

* ETHN/ROCS 2200 Introduction to African Literature
Fall. Creative and Critical writing in the English language by writers of African descent. Also writers of the Caribbean. Credit allowed for only one of ROCS 2200 or ETHN 2200.

* FREN 2010 Intermediate French I
Fall, Spring. Grammar review; development of the four skills. Three class periods and laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: FREN 1020 or two years of French in high school.

* FREN 2020 Intermediate French II
Fall, Spring. A communicative approach to intermediate language using the four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, along with French and Francophone culture. Prerequisite: FREN 2010 or three years of high school French.

* FREN 2220 French Culture
Fall and/or Spring. An introduction to the cultural, social, intellectual, and artistic life of French-speaking peoples from the perspective of French-American relations and intercultural comparisons and using readings, film, music, and other media. Readings and class in English. Does not fulfill language requirements or count toward the major or minor in French.

* GERM 2150 German Culture and Civilization
Cultural-historical treatment of the social, intellectual and artistic life of the German-speaking peoples from medieval times to World War II. Lectures, audiovisual presentations and readings in English. Approved for distance education.

* GERM 2160 Contemporary Germany
Lecture-reading course in English. Division of Germany after World War II; rebuilding and development of the two German states since 1949; political, economic and social systems, inter-German relations, patterns of daily living; revolution in East Germany and process of unification. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) humanities and the arts and international perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

* MUCT 1250 Exploring Music of World Cultures
Fall, Spring, Summer. Musical systems of major non-Western art musics: Africa, Near East, Pacific and Asia. Theoretical, analytical and cultural concepts related to music. Not open to bachelor of music degree students, except for those in the world music program. [Approved for distance education]

* PHIL 2190 Philosophy of Death and Dying
Fall, Spring, Summer. Everyone dies. But no one talks about it. This course breaks the silence by exploring questions like the following: What is death? How do we know when someone has died? Should we ever seek to die? How should societies approach suicide? Why do we fear death? Should we fear death? What can thinking about death tell us about how to live? Is there any evidence that we might be immortal? Would immortality actually be good for us, anyway? How should we deal with death? How is death dealt with cross-culturally? Approved for distance education.

* ROCS/ETHN 2200 Introduction to African Literature
Fall. Creative and Critical writing in the English language by writers of African descent. Also writers of the Caribbean. Credit allowed for only one of ROCS 2200 or ETHN 2200.

RUSN 2150 Russian Culture
Russian culture and its manifestations in arts, family and social life, folkways, religion, and other areas. Presentations, readings, and writing in English. Approved for Distance Education.

* RUSN 2160 Post-Communist Russia
Russian society and cultural values as reflected in such aspects of life as the arts, education, work, recreation, politics, family life, and religion. Cross-cultural approach. Presentations, readings, and writing in English. International perspectives course. Applicable to the BG Perspective (general education) humanities and arts and international perspective requirements. [Approved for distance education]

* SPAN 2010 Intermediate Spanish I
Fall, Spring. Communicative approach to teach intermediate language use in the four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, writing (emphasis on composition). Reading and discussion in Spanish of cultural readings. Three classroom hours and one-hour scheduled laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: SPAN 1020 or two years of Spanish in high school.

* SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II
Fall, Spring. SPAN 2010 continued. Three classroom hours and one-hour scheduled laboratory practice each week. Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or three years of Spanish in high school.

* SPAN 2030 Intermediate Spanish for the Professions
Fall, Spring. Alternative to SPAN 2020 or 2120 that includes specialized vocabulary and communicative practice for professional use; may focus on medical, legal, or business uses. Three classroom hours. Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or three years of Spanish in high school. Applicable to the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement.

* SPAN 2700 Hispanic Culture
Introduction to the cultural, social, intellectual, and artistic life of Latin America and/or Spain from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Presentations, readings, and writing in English. Approved for distance education.

International Perspective courses approved to also fulfill a Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement

* AFRS 2000 – Introduction to Africana Studies
Fall, Spring, and Summer. Regular and online course introducing students to the interdisciplinary methodology, crosscultural perspectives, literary genres, and critical-analysis skills needed to study peoples of African descent. Focus is on the arts and humanities. [Approved for distance education]

* ASIA/HIST 1800 Asian Civilizations
Fall, Spring. This is a core course for all Asian Studies majors and minors. Provides general knowledge of Asia relative to historical, cultural, social, economic, and political developments of selected countries in East, South, or Southeast Asia. Credit allowed for only one of ASIA 1800, HIST 1800. [Approved for distance education]

* ASIA 2000 – Introduction to Asian Religions
Fall or Spring. This course provides an introduction to Asian Religions. It looks at some of the sacred texts, philosophies, and practices of religions either started in South, East, or Southeast Asia or practiced by large numbers of people there, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shintoism, Sikhism, Jainism, Taoism, and Confucianism. Students will leave the class with a sense of the diversity of "Asia" as well as an understanding that religions are not monolithic, but open to interpretation both by practitioners and by artists - musicians, dancers, painters, and writers.

* CAST 2010 Introduction to Canadian Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer on demand. Multidisciplinary review of Canadian development. Comparisons with the United States. Canada's history, geography, government and political system, population and social policy, economy and foreign trade, literature, art, and popular culture. [Approved for distance education]

* GEOG 1210 World Geography: Eurasia & Africa
Fall, Spring. Geographical analysis of variations and interrelationships of physical, cultural, economic, political, and population factors across the earth's surface. Focus on Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Asia. [Approved for distance education]

* GEOG 1220 World Geography: Americas and the Pacific
Fall, Spring. Geographical analysis of variations and interrelationships of physical, cultural, economic, political, and population factors across the earth's surface. Focus on North America, Latin America, Australia-New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands. [Approved for distance education]

* GEOG 2630 The Rising Dragon: China’s Global Reach
Fall, Summer. This course is a comprehensive survey of contemporary China. It traces the changes occurring in this nation across both space and time. Beginning with China's diverse natural environments and continuing through its recent past, it presents contemporary China as a product of both past and present internal and external forces. Current and future successes and challenges will be discussed by placing China in context as a massive, yet still developing, nation that must meet the needs of its 1.3 billion plus citizens while becoming a major regional and global power. [Approved for distance education]

* HIST 1510 World Civilizations
Fall, Spring, Summer. Comparative study of how and why economic, social, political and intellectual factors shaped and defined the history of selected Western and non-Western civilizations in the ancient and medieval periods. [Approved for distance education]

* HIST 1520 Modern World
Fall, Spring, Summer. Comparative study of how and why selected economic, social, political and intellectual revolutions of the modern world have transformed and are shaping contemporary European and non-Western cultures. Approved for distance education.

* HIST/ASIA 1800 Asian Civilizations
Fall, Spring. Interdisciplinary study of Asian civilizations, such as China, Japan, Korea and India; emphasis on how and why socio-economic, political and intellectual developments shaped traditional cultures of Asia and transformed modern Asia into the fastest-growing region of the world. Credit allowed for only one of ASIA 1800, HIST 1800. [Approved for distance education]

* INST 2000 Introduction to International Studies
Fall, Spring, Summer. This introduction to the International Studies major provides an interdisciplinary overview of the processes and effects of globalization. Major themes include population and migration (demographics), the role of women, environmental change, economic and political issues. [Approved for distance education]

POLS 1710 Introduction to Comparative Government
Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic concepts, approaches to and comparisons of different political systems, including political cultures, participation, interest groups, institutions and processes; essential tools and methods for the study of political systems in the world. Approved for distance education.

* POLS 1720 Introduction to International Relations
Fall, Spring, Summer. Historical and contemporary overview of the modern international system; governmental and nongovernmental actors influencing international relations; major issues of the post-cold-war period. Approved for distance education.

* SOC 2310 Cultural Anthropology
Fall, Spring, Summer. Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the study of culture. Examines cultural variation in social organization, cultural values, and subsistence, and the differential impact of globalization. [Approved for distance education]

* TECH 3020 Technology Systems in Societies
Current issues and their relationship to technology and systems in various cultures throughout the world; emphasis on explaining technological behaviors, and on showing how technology permeates all human affairs. Two one-and-one-half-hour lectures per week. Prerequisite: junior status or consent of instructor. [Approved for distance education]