Public Screenings

BGSU Film Theater 2019-2020 Schedule
Bowling Green State University

BGSU Film Theater

Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater (Room 206)


Tuesdays at the BGSU Film Theater

Sponsored by the Department of Theatre and Film.

All films are free and open to the public.

On Tuesday nights, the BGSU Film Theater is THE place to be. With classics, cult favorites, quirky indie films and cutting-edge documentaries, Tuesdays at The Theater is for fans and connoisseurs looking for film treasures off the beaten track.

Fall 2019

La Mission (2009) U.S., 117 minutes, Director: Peter Bratt

Introduction by Hannah Mueller, Instructor in the Department of Theatre and Film

A collaboration between actor Benjamin Bratt and his brother Peter, La Mission revolves around a complicated father-son relationship in San Francisco’s Mission District – a traditionally Latinx neighborhood on the verge of gentrification. Che Rivera (Bratt) is a formerly incarcerated recovering alcoholic who has been raising his son alone after the death of his wife. When Che finds out that his son is gay, he struggles to reconcile his worldview with his love for his son.    

Skate Kitchen (2018) U.S., 106 minutes, Director: Crystal Moselle

Introduction by Thomas Castillo, Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre and Film

Crystal Moselle, known for her award-winning documentary The Wolfpack (2015), uses trained and first-time actors in Skate Kitchen, which focuses on a young woman looking for meaning and a sense of belonging. Based on a short by Moselle, the feature follows Camille (Colombian-American Rachelle Vinberg), who wants to join an all-girl skateboard crew in New York City. Once accepted by the group, Camille must negotiate the challenges of peer pressure and dynamic teen friendships.

Some Like It Hot (1959) U.S., 121 minutes, Director: Billy Wilder

Introduction by Cortland Rankin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Theatre and Film

After witnessing a mob hit in Prohibition-era Chicago, musicians Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) escape to Florida disguised as members of an all-female jazz band. While Joe uses the masquerade to cozy up to the band’s lead singer (Marilyn Monroe), Jerry embraces his feminine side. Written by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond with a star turn from Jack Lemmon, Some Like It Hot rightly ranks among the greatest film comedies of all time.

Gates of Heaven (1978) U.S., 85 minutes, Director: Errol Morris

Introduction by by Stephen Crompton, Instructor in the Department of Theatre and Film

In his documentary feature debut, Gates of Heaven, filmmaker Errol Morris explores the life and death of pet cemeteries. Speaking with the business owners, and those who surround them, including bereaved family members, he unearths a series of rich characters willing to share their thoughts on faith, love, loss, and the pursuit of the American dream. In a 1991 article, Roger Ebert named Gates of Heaven one of the ten greatest films of all time.

BGSU student films, 90 minutes, Curator: Lucas Ostrowski

Moderated by Lucas Ostrowski, Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre and Film

Cineposium is an event for screening and critiquing student films created in courses such as Cinematography, Editing-Image-Sound, Sync-Sound Production, Applied Aesthetics for the Moving Image, and Capstone Projects in Film. The event is enlivened by the opportunity for the filmmakers, the audience, and faculty members to engage in a dialogue about students’ projects.

BGSU Student Screenplays, 90 minutes, Curator: Austin Windau

Hosted by Jillian Riley, Film Production Major in the Department of Theatre and Film

This event features staged readings of two student screenplays. Thoughtful discussions involving the author, the audience, and the performers follow each reading. The conversations will explore the authors’ inspirations and visions. They will also facilitate revisions that will strengthen story structure, characterizations, tone, dialogue, and the translation into actual production.

Hereditary (2018) U.S., 127 minutes, Director: Ari Aster

Introduction by Britt Rhuart, Graduate Student in American Culture Studies

After the death of her mother, Annie (Toni Collette), her husband, and their children are haunted by the memory of their departed and perhaps more. In a film that is as much about mental illness as it is about ghosts and witch covens, first-time feature director Ari Aster paints a picture of a family struggling with grief and the horror that can surpass grief even after death into a world beyond.

Spring 2020

Us (2019) U.S., 120 minutes, Director: Jordan Peele

Introduction by Cheyanne Jeffries, Graduate Student in American Culture Studies

This film is a powerful follow-up to Jordan Peele’s landmark directorial debut Get Out. Like the 2017 film, Us is revitalizing the horror genre by illustrating its potential to examine social inequalities and the psychological trauma they cause. The film centers on the experiences of Adelaide Wilson (Lupita Nyong’o) and her husband (Winston Duke) and children. The story kicks into high gear when the family’s upscale seaside vacation takes an unexpected turn.           

Sorry to Bother You (2018) U.S., 101 minutes, Director: Boots Riley

Introduction by Jolie Sheffer, Associate Professor of English and American Culture Studies

Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You is a scathing satire of late-stage capitalism, class striving, and racial inequality. Set in an alternate version of Oakland, the film follows Cassius Green (LaKeith Stanfield), a lowly telemarketer who discovers he has a remarkable talent that can lead him to unimaginable wealth—but at great cost to his body, mind, soul, and relationships. With remarkable wit and verve, the film depicts the American dream as a Ponzi scheme.

If Beale Street Could Talk (2018) U.S., 119 minutes, Director: Barry Jenkins

Introduction by Daniel Williams, Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre and Film

Based on the novel by James Baldwin, Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James), a young couple filled with optimism over Tish’s pregnancy, have their lives thrust into chaos when Fonny is arrested for rape. Tish and Fonny’s struggle is further intensified by the discontent amongst the extended family members over Tish’s pregnancy. Only Tish’s mother Sharon (Regina King - Best Supporting Actress), filled with fortitude and perseverance, can shepherd them through the troubling times.

Gas Food Lodging (1992) U.S., 102 minutes, Director: Allison Anders

Introduction by Cynthia Baron, Professor in the Department of Theatre and Film

Rather than follow the adventures of (anti)heroes on road trips, what would you see if you paused to explore the lives of the women at roadside diners who provide temporary comfort and distraction? This question and others animate Allison Anders’s inventive indie film. Highlighting its engaging characters and performances, critics have applauded the film’s ingenious multi-thread narrative and its bold but humorous look at sex, family dynamics, racial prejudice, and the experience of crossing boundaries.        

Girlfight (2000) U.S., 110 minutes, Director: Karyn Kusama

Introduction by Elizabeth Niehaus, Graduate Student in American Culture Studies

Girlfight is the debut feature film by writer-director Karyn Kusama, who has also directed episodes of The L Word (2007) and films like Aeon Flux (2005), Jennifer’s Body (2009), and Destroyer (2018). Starring Michelle Rodriguez, Girlfight is the story of Diana, a struggling high school student with a difficult home life. On a whim, Diana decides to begin training as a boxer and discovers the passion and empowerment her life has been missing.

BGSU Faculty and Studio Experience Films, 90 minutes, Curator: Lucas Ostrowski

Hosted by Lucas Ostrowski, Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre and Film

Faculty Cineposium is an event for screening and discussing Department of Theatre and Film Studio Experience productions directed by faculty and produced by student filmmakers. It is an opportunity to see films that have premiered on campus and gone on to festival screenings. It is also a chance to talk with student and faculty filmmakers about the pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution process.    

BGSU Student Screenplays, 90 minutes, Curator: John Schwartz

Hosted by John Schwartz, Film Production Major in the Department of Theatre and Film

This event features staged readings of two student screenplays. Thoughtful discussions involving the author, the audience, and the performers follow each reading. The conversations will explore the authors’ inspirations and visions. They will also facilitate revisions that will strengthen story structure, characterizations, tone, dialogue, and the translation into actual production.


Thursday Nights International Film Series

The International Film Series brings classic and recent foreign-language films features and occasionally a documentary - to campus to acquaint university and off-campus communities with a selection of world cinema. Sometimes sets of films correspond to a theme or to a course topic, in which case faculty members frequently introduce them. Students of world languages also enjoy seeing films in the original language on a large screen, but all films do carry English subtitles. All films are free and open to the public.

Fall 2019

The Official Story (1985) Argentina, 112 minutes, Directed by Luis Puenzo

Introduction by Michael Miller, President of the BGSU Film Appreciation Club

Bordering on the line between thriller and tragedy, this film focuses on a high school teacher who tries to find the real mother of her adopted daughter. Taking place in the final months of the Argentinian Military Dictatorship in 1983, the film prompts the serious question of what is best for a little girl. Winner of the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, The Official Story is a challenging look into a woman’s struggle

The Motorcycle Diaries (2004) Argentina, 126 minutes, Directed by Walter Salles

Introduction by by Michael Miller, President of the BGSU Film Appreciation Club

In 1952, a young Che Guevara (Gael García Bernal) begins to discover who he will become as he goes on a road trip across South America with his friend Alberto (Rodrigo De la Serna). The story illustrates the importance and complexities of friendship and youth. Featuring the beautiful scenery of South America and the interesting strangers they meet along the way, The Motorcycle Diaries shows a young man who slowly comes to understand his destiny.

Spring 2020