Public Screenings

Gish Film Theater 2018-2019 Schedule
The Dorothy and Lillian Gish Film Theater
Bowling Green State University

Gish Film Theater and Gallery

Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater (Room 206)


Tuesdays at the Gish

Sponsored by the Department of Theatre and Film.

All films are free and open to the public.

On Tuesday nights, the Gish Film Theater is THE place to be. With classics, cult favorites, quirky indie films and cutting-edge documentaries, Tuesdays at The Gish is for fans and connoisseurs looking for film treasures off the beaten track.

Fall 2018

The Glass Castle (2017) U.S., 127 minutes, Director: Destin Daniel Cretton

Hosted by UFO/BGReel

Introduction by Maria Spirina, doctoral student in American Culture Studies

The story follows Jeannette (Brie Larson) and her wildly eccentric parents (Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts). Based on journalist Jeanette Wall’s bestselling memoir, the film intertwines events from the unpredictable nomadic childhood that Jeannette and her siblings experienced with scenes of Jeannette as a young writer who comes to terms with her parents. Destin Daniel Cretton, an independent director known for his award-winning film Short Term 12, directs this compelling coming-of-age film.    

The Florida Project  (2017) U.S., 115 minutes, Director: Sean Baker

Introduction by Britt Rhuart, doctoral student in American Culture Studies

This independent film starring Willem Dafoe as a caring motel manager introduces Brooklynn Prince as a six-year-old girl who lives with her brash young mother (Bria Vinaite) in a cheap motel near Disney World. We follow the girl’s adventures and misadventures with her ragtag band of friends throughout a summer. Noted for its performances, the film offers a sensitive portrayal of people whose lives do not reflect the wonders of the Magic Kingdom.

BGSU student films, 90 minutes, Curator: Lucas Ostrowski

Moderated by Lucas Ostrowski, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre and Film

Cineposium is an event for screening and critiquing student films created in courses such as  Cinematography, Editing-Image-Sound, Sync-Sound Production, Applied Aesthetics for the Moving Image, and Capstone Projects in Film. The event is enlivened by the opportunity for the filmmakers, the audience, and members of the faculty members to engage in a dialogue about students' projects.

BGSU student screenplays, 90 minutes, Curator: Austin Windau

Moderated by Austin Windau, film production major and Honors College student

This event features staged readings of two student screenplays. Thoughtful discussions involving the author, the audience, and the performers follow each reading. The conversations will explore the authors’ inspirations and visions. They will also facilitate revisions that will strengthen story structure, characterizations, tone, dialogue, and the translation into actual production.

Nighthawks (1981) U.S., 99 minutes, Director: Bruce Malmuth

Introduction by Lucas Ostrowski, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre and Film

New York City is gripped in fear due to the exploits of an international terrorist (Rutger Hauer). Only two NYC cops (Sylvester Stallone and Billy Dee Williams) can stop his citywide siege. Filled with plenty of 1980s action and intrigue, the terror of Nighthawks seems more prescient in a post-9/11 world. Join us for part one of our cult tribute to Sylvester Stallone and be on the lookout for his truly head-turning performance.

Over the Top  (1987) U.S., 93 minutes, Director: Menahem Golan

Introduction by Stephen Crompton, Instructor, Department of Theatre and Film

Sylvester Stallone is a down-on-his-luck truck driver and competitive arm wrestler, looking to bond with his estranged son as they drive across the country while pursued by his son’s evil and powerful grandfather (Robert Loggia). Their destination: the World Arm Wrestling Championship in Las Vegas. The prize at stake: a new truck. Co-written by Stallone, Over the Top is a film that captures the ambitions of the notorious but now defunct exploitation studio, Cannon Films.

Pulse  (2001) Japan, 119 minutes, Director: Kiyosk Kurosawa

Introduction by Adam Cohen, doctoral student in American Culture Studies

This prophetic horror film, said to have predicted the rise of internet isolation, tells two parallel storylines in which the souls of the deceased invade millennial Tokyo via the internet. Unlike low budget or franchise-driven Hollywood movies, Kiyoski Kurosawa’s Pulse avoids the conventional gimmicks and overused clichés found throughout the horror genre. Instead, Kurosawa, recognized internationally for his work in Japanese horror cinema, presents a slow-burning, atmospheric film that fills audiences with existential dread.  

Spring 2019

Get Out (2017) U.S., 103 minutes, Director: Jordan Peele

Introduction by R. Monk, Master's student in Popular Culture

Don’t miss Jordan Peele’s acclaimed debut film, which is both a jump-scare thriller and a masterpiece of social analysis. Daniel Kaluuya is Chris, the new black boyfriend brought by his white girlfriend (Allison Williams) to meet her family and spend the weekend at their estate. Socially awkward moments devolve into disturbing and then terrifying experiences as Chris’s buddy back home (Lil Rey Howery) becomes a source of comic relief, incisive commentary, and Chris’s only lifeline.     

MArshall  (2017) U.S., 118 minutes, Director: Reginald Hudlin

Introduction by Jacqueline Hudson, doctoral student in American Culture Studies

Directed by Reginald Hudlin and starring Chadwick Boseman, Marshall is about Thurgood Marshall, the leading NAACP lawyer from 1938-1961 whose victories include the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka decision, and who became the first African American Supreme Court justice in 1967. To illuminate Marshall as a person, the film concentrates on a case early in his legal career when he represented a black man accused of rape by his white female employer. 

Gook  (2015) U.S., 94 minutes, Director: Justin Chon

Introduction by Tyler Wertsch, doctoral student in American Culture Studies

Justin Chon, a YouTube personality and star known for portraying Eric in the Twilight films, directs and stars in this gritty award-winning indie film. Set in 1992 South Central Los Angeles at the time of the Rodney King case, the story follows Korean storeowners Eli (Chon) and his brother, and Eli’s brotherly friendship with a preteen African American girl, whose family, like everyone in the neighbor, see the Koreans as part of the racist system.   

Raw  (2016) France, 98 minutes, Director: Julia Ducournau

Introduction by Anna McKibben, curator of the film/politics/culture blog Start Focus End

Raised as a vegetarian, freshman Justine (Garance Marillier) is sent to a reputable veterinary school where her older sister is studying. There, Justine is suddenly thrust into an alarming world of traditions and vicious initiation rituals. Before long, she is forced to ruminate over her devout herbivorous beliefs. Descending deep into uncharted animalistic tendencies, an unprecedented and unquenched craving for raw meat will replace her revulsion, transforming Justine into a monstrous carnivore.

Wendy and Lucy (2015) U.S., 80 minutes, Director: Kelly Reichardt

Introduction by Elizabeth Collins, doctoral student in American Culture Studies

This award-winning film is an intimate character study of a young woman, Wendy, and her dog Lucy. On her way to find work in Alaska, Wendy’s car breaks down in a small town and she finds herself stranded and unable to pay for repairs or even food. Directed by Kelly Reichardt and starring Michelle Williams, this American drama is a simple yet beautifully told narrative of uncertainty and hope in the face of hardship.

BGSU faculty and Studio Experience films, 90 minutes, Curator: Lucas Ostrowski

Moderated by Lucas Ostrowski, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre and Film

Faculty Cineposium is an event for screening and discussing Department of Theatre and Film Studio Experience productions directed by faculty and produced by student filmmakers. It is an opportunity to see films that have premiered on campus and gone on to festival screenings. It is also a chance to talk with student and faculty filmmakers about the pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution process.    

BGSU student screenplays, 90 minutes, Curator: Austin Windau

Moderated by Austin Windau, film production major and Honors College student

This event features staged readings of two student screenplays. Thoughtful discussions involving the author, the audience, and the performers follow each reading. The conversations will explore the authors’ visions to facilitate revisions that will strengthen story structure, characterizations, tone, dialogue, and the translation into actual production.


Thursday Nights International Film Series

The International Film Series brings classic and recent foreign-language films features and occasionally a documentary - to campus to acquaint university and off-campus communities with a selection of world cinema. Sometimes sets of films correspond to a theme or to a course topic, in which case faculty members frequently introduce them. Students of world languages also enjoy seeing films in the original language on a large screen, but all films do carry English subtitles. All films are free and open to the public.

Fall 2018

Paradise Now (2005) Palestine, 90 minutes, Directors: Hany Abu-Assad

Introduction by Mohamadreza Babaee, doctoral student in the Department of Theatre and Film

An Academy Award nominee for Best Foreign Film, Paradise Now tells the story of two lifelong Palestinian friends who believe their freedom from the oppression of the Israeli government can only come from sacrificing themselves in a suicide bombing. International critics have praised the film as a breathless suspense thriller that portrays the suicide bombers not as fanatics, but as human beings who seek to escape the black and white claws of toxic politics.

Lemon Tree (2008) Israel, 106 minutes, Director: Eran Riklis

Introduction by Dennis Sloan, doctoral student in Theatre

A feminist and political allegory, The Lemon Tree tells the story of Salma, a Palestinian widow who earns her living from a grove of lemon trees her family has owned for fifty years. When the Israeli defense minister moves in next door and announces plans to uproot the trees to eliminate a perceived security risk, Salma engages in a legal battle to protect her income and her way of life.

Spring 2019