DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND FILM NEWSLETTER

2021-22 | Vol. 5 | Spring/Summer 2022

Lesa LockfordGreetings from the Chair

After a brief hiatus, we are happy to welcome back our end-of-year Theatre and Film Department Newsletter!

It is an exciting time for us and we’re eager to tell you about some of the activities of our students, faculty, and alumni.

A kick-off meeting launched our fall semester as we welcomed our returning and new students out on the Wolfe Center patio. Following the meeting, an outdoor screening of Zombieland was presented on an inflatable screen out back of the Wolfe Center on our grassy slope.

This academic year was filled with professional development opportunities. Our first of the year was a masterclass with screenwriter Mitch Brian, who is also a Teaching Professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. This event was followed by an informative discussion about the business and pursuing acting in Los Angeles by Jeff Witjas, Senior Vice President of Talent and Partner at the Agency for the Performing Arts and BGSU alum. In November, Bruce Roberts, a 30-year veteran actor, producer, director in New York City presented a workshop on the business side of theatre titled “The Business of the Business.” Babette Roberts, veteran stage manager in New York City led a workshop on the "Nuts and Bolts of Stage Management." Associate Director of Second City in Chicago, Jessica Mitolo, also a BGSU theatre alumna, led a two-day workshop on "Building Comedic Material from… Anything." A highlight of the year was the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds Series lecture and workshops presented by Oscar Award-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black.

Our students and faculty have been busy creating as well. There have also been several film events that have featured the work of our talented students and faculty. In the fall and spring, we held Screen-Play in which student screenwriters’ work is read by actors and discussed. In the fall we held Cineposium where student short films were screened, including the senior film project of BGSU alum Ahmad Ghanim, Daughters of a Different Path. Spring Cineposium featured the creative work of our film production faculty. The mainstage theatre and dance productions this year began in the fall with Jordan Harrison’s The Amateurs directed by Prof. Sara Chambers. In November, the fall dance concert, Alight, was staged and choreographed by students and instructors, including Prof. Colleen Murphy. The spring semester began with the delightfully playful production of The Magnificent Baron Munchausen: His Travels, Triumphs, and Tribulations: A Pleasant Diversion by Marionettes in Motion, designed, adapted and directed by Prof. Bradford Clark. Prof. Clark also designed and carved all the marionettes used in the production. Our final show of the season, Pippin, was also the final production of retiring faculty member and director, Prof. Michael Ellison.

In this issue of our newsletter, there is additional information about this year’s productions, events, and student activities. We also feature several interviews. For instance, new theatre faculty member Prof. D. Amy-Rose Forbes Erickson discusses her research interests and upcoming goals. Film Production faculty member Prof. Daniel Williams relates his experience of his recent Faculty Improvement Leave. And we look ahead at our next season!

We are proud of our busy schedule of theatre and film productions, and of our faculty who have been recognized for their work. In all, we think you’ll agree what a dynamic time it is here in the Wolfe Center for the Arts!

Sincerely,
Lesa Lockford, Professor and Chair
Department of Theatre and Film

NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE: To view previous newsletters, visit the Theatre and Film Newsletter Archive.

Events

Annual Kickoff Meeting

September 2, 2021 | Wolfe Patio
Screening of Zombieland on the grass behind the Wolfe Center 

theatre-and-film-kickoff-meeting

“Structure: Who Cares?” Screenwriting Masterclass with Mitch Brian

September 21, 2021 (7:30 PM) | Zoom

“Stage Management Seminar: Nuts and Bolts Basics” presented by Babette Roberts

November 6, 2021 (2:30 PM) | Wolfe Center 201

 “The Business of the Business” Workshop presented by Bruce Roberts

November 6, 2021 (2:30 PM) | Wolfe Center 203

Q & A with Talent Agent Jeff Witjas

November 17, 2021 (9:30 AM) | Eva Marie Saint Theatre

Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds Series: “The Power of Story” featuring Dustin Lance Black

February 10, 2022 (7:30 PM) | Kobacker Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center
Workshop on Activism and Art, February 10
Workshop on Screenwriting Process, February 11

Dustin-Lance-Black-BGSU-Workshop and-Keynote

In the Round Series: Seth Sutton

February 25, 2022 (5:30 PM) | Olscamp 101

In the Round Series: Carole Lindstron and Michaela Goade

April 1, 2022 (5:30 PM) | Olscamp 101

Michael Ellison’s Retirement Celebration

April 10, 2022 (4:30 PM) | Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre 

Dr. Petra Kuppers Workshop and Lecture

April 13, 2022 | Eva Marie Saint Theatre

Elsewhere: The Train

By Irene L. Pynn
Directed by Nicole Line
October 1-2 (8 PM)

The Amateurs

By Jordan Harrison
Directed by Sara Chambers
October 28-30 (8 PM)
October 30-31 (2 PM)
Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre

The-Amateurs

Fall Dance Concert: Alight

Directed and Choreographed by Colleen Murphy
November 19-20 (8 PM)
Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre

Alight-fall-concert

Cineposium

A curated collection of short films produced in part by the Department of Theatre and Film. Screenings included projects from THFM 4880 Studio Experience and the premiere of Ahmad Ghanim’s senior film Daughters of a Different Path.
November 2 (7:30 PM)
Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theatre

Elsewhere: Exit, Pursued by a Bear

By Lauren Gunderson
Directed by Lauren Lash
February 4-5
Eva Marie Saint Theatre

The Magnificent Baron Munchausen: His Travels, Triumphs, and Tribulations

Adapted, Designed and Directed by Bradford Clark
February 17-20 and 24-26 (8 PM)
February 19-20 and 26 (2 PM)
Eva Marie Saint Theatre

Munchausen

Elsewhere: Hecate Hill

By Bill Fountain
Directed by Caleb Wise
March 18-19 (8 PM)
Eva Marie Saint Theatre

Spring Opera: Orpheus in the Underworld

In collaboration with the College of Musical Arts
Directed by Jane Schoonmaker Rodgers
March 25 (8 PM)
March 27 (3 PM)

Pippin

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz
Book by Roger O. Hirson
Directed by Michael Ellison
April 7-9 (8 PM)
April 9-10 (2 PM)
Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre

pippin

Screen-Play

Screen-Play features staged readings of two student screenplays. Thoughtful conversations with the authors, the audience, and the performers follow the readings to explore the authors’ inspirations and visions. These discussions facilitate revisions to strengthen story structure, characterizations, tone, dialogue, and translation into actual production.
February 15 (7:30 PM)
Zoom

Faculty Cineposium

A curated collection of short films and research presentations created by film production and film studies faculty.
March 22 (7:30 PM)
Bowen-Thompson Student Union Film Theatre

Film and Media Festival

A celebration of student-made short films from across the BGSU campus. Sponsored by the University Film Organization, BG Reel, and the Department of Theatre and Film.
April 9-10
Bowen-Thompson Student Union Film Theatre

Capstone Film Showcase

A premiere showcase of work produced by upper-level film students in the Department of Theatre and Film in the 20/21 and 21/22 academic years.
April 22 (7:30 PM)
Thomas B. Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre 

Student Organizations

APO (Alpha Psi Omega National Theatre Honor Society) was organized for the purpose of providing acknowledgement to those demonstrating a high standard of accomplishment in theatre and providing a wider community for those interested in theatre. We provide professional development and educational opportunities for those interested in theatre or theatre related careers. Meetings are held on a weekly basis.
 

BG on Screen is a film production-based organization for students of any background to come promote and produce projects through the organization. We provide our members hands-on experience to develop their filmmaking skills as well as equipment, cast, and crew if they need it through either a pitched project to the club or by participating in another project. Our goal is to have our members projects screened and promoted; as well as developing production skills while in university. We work with Professor Lucas Ostrowski as our faculty advisor. This year, we have produced three short films, hosted screenwriting and acting workshops, and kicked off several larger projects and writers' rooms!
 
BG Reel/University Film Organization is an organization that holds weekly meetings at Olscamp 117 at 9 p.m. on Thursdays. We are in charge of the 48-hour film challenges, film technique workshops (which, this year, included workshops in sound recording and SFX makeup), and the annual Film and Media Festival. Our faculty advisors are Thomas Castillo and Jose Cardenas.
 
MuTS (Musical Theatre Students) is a student organization designed for any undergraduate who loves musical theatre! The MuTS 2021-2022 officership consists of Nicole Line as President, Victoria Norland as VP, Hallie Foy as Treasurer, and McKinley Witt as Secretary. Our faculty advisor is Dr. Heath Diehl from the Honors College. At our member meetings, we discuss a "Musical of the Month," advertise different theatre events/opportunities at BGSU and in the surrounding community, and bond with our fellow members through games and activities. MuTS meets every other Tuesday evening at 10:30 p.m. in the Heskett.

MuTS had a very successful year for membership. We had record-breaking interest from campus fest and the department kick-off events back in August, and we had a record-breaking number of non-theatre majors join our organization this year! Our Mutts/Puppies (big/little) program was a huge success with over 30 "Puppies" finding their forever homes with our Mutts. Some of our favorite activities at member meetings include Name That Tune, Karaoke Night, and our classic Kahoot games!
 
GuSTO (Graduate Student Theatre Organization) is an organization for graduate students in the department of theatre and film to get more involved. Our members meet once a month, organizing department events, like this year’s workshop and lecture with activist and performance artist, Dr. Petra Kuppers, and fundraisers, like our book sale. In addition, this organization offers opportunities for professional development and encourages graduate students to get involved with the Graduate Student Senate, the department’s season selection committee, and more.
 
UDA (University Dance Alliance) held our first in-person student showcase this past fall - the first since fall 2019. There were over 700 people in attendance over the two days. March 5-7, we sent four of our members to ACDA and had the opportunity to take classes from faculty from different universities. Our spring show was held on April 1-2.
 
Film Appreciation Club meets weekly to discuss film as an art. These meetings are open to all students, and discussions are shaped by weekly themes, such as “Female Directors,” “Wes Anderson Films,” “Food in Film,” and many more.

Dialogue With D. Amy Rose Forbes-Erickson | New Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies

I'm a theatre/performance scholar/artist/teacher. I earned a doctorate in Theatre: Performance as Public Practice from the University of Texas at Austin with a doctoral portfolio in African and African American Studies with focus on the African Diaspora. I hold an M.A. in Theatre from the University of Kentucky, a B.A. (Hons) in Theatre Design from the University of the Arts, London (Central Saint Martins), England, and a Diploma in Sculpture (Edna Manley College), Kingston, Jamaica.

My research interests include ritual drama, Caribbean masquerades, digital media technologies, performance studies, and Africana studies. My teaching interests are theatre and performance histories, Black social movements, and contemporary performances, and ethnomusicology.

I'm currently researching and writing about Caribbean masquerades from the 17th century to the early 21st century to investigate why certain masquerade figures reoccur over the centuries, recontextualized as decolonial acts in parades, carnivals, spectacles, the visual and performing arts, and literary devices. I'm also teaching about contemporary Black theatre and performance and cultural diversity through performance this Spring 2022.

Current and future research projects have been and will be about developing the Pan-African Theatre Ensemble in collaboration with the Afro Caribbean ensemble at BGSU for outreach to Black and Indigenous communities and the wider Bowling Green and Toledo communities, providing opportunities for students, including participating in international festivals and conferences.

I'm looking forward to participating in theatre productions in some way, developing teaching and learning strategies, collaborating with students and colleagues, and focusing on my research agenda that will support and enhance the Department's and University's goals and mission.

I take my two Russian blue cats (Marcus and Molly) for outside walks with their *blingy​* collars and leashes. They fancy themselves as dogs who need to go for outside walks. Yes, I spoil them rotten. ☺️

Amy-Rose-Forbes-Erickson-THFM
Daniel-Williams-THFM

Dialogue With Daniel Williams, Associate Professor of Film Production

I had several productive experiences during my leave which were beneficial since many of the things I proposed didn’t come to be. It was also a nice coincidence that my leave corresponded with some unexpected opportunities, and I was able to participate. A film I’ve been working on for a long time, I Am Kinloch, was accepted to the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase in July, and then invited to screen at the St. Louis International Film Festival in November. I started production on this film in 2002 and have periodically traveled to St. Louis to capture footage and to interview residents and former residents of Kinloch, MO., the first all-black incorporated town in the state. My family’s history goes back to the early 1900s, and my mother is essentially the main character and co-producer. The plan has always been to tell the story of this town that no longer exists in a feature length film, but I felt compelled during the summer of 2020 to craft a short version, mainly so my mother and many of the people interviewed in the film could see something. It’s been too long, but I won’t apologize for that. Things are finished when they’re finished, and while there’s a short version that seems to work, the film still isn’t finished.

I was also honored with an invitation to attend the 25th anniversary screening of Sankofa at the new Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. ARRAY, Ava Duvernay’s company worked with director Haile Gerima to remaster the 35mm film in 4K and handle its distribution. I think they did an amazing job on the remaster. I hadn’t seen the film in years, and it’s still incredibly moving. I was a student of Gerima’s and lived in DC when his small company independently distributed the film nationally. During the post screening panel discussion with Bradford Young, Raafi Rivero (both former students at Howard U.), and Gerima, we talked about our experience seeing the film for the first time, and our relationship with Haile and the film school. I mentioned how I used to clean the 35mm prints when they were returned from the theaters and prep them for the next booking. That kind of film distribution work isn’t done much anymore.

As part of the Gerima film retrospective that ran through the month of October, a modest short film that I made with a small group of students from the Theatre and Film Department in 2009, screened at the museum. When the film curator selected Solace, I only had a Quicktime file with okay resolution of the film. I wanted the film to step up the venue, so I got the original 16mm camera negative scanned at 2K resolution and conformed the negative. Professor Stephen Crompton brought his skills to the project, finished the color grade and mastered the DCP for the theater. While there was considerable cost involved, even with the initial decision to make the film on 16mm, I appreciate being able to access that tangible material without the risks of hard drive failures and data rot. When I originally finished this film back in 2011 or so, no festival would touch it. I think the only screening it had was at the Gish Film Theater in old Hanna Hall. We produced that film in three days, and I think it holds up. I’m proud of it, and I appreciate the students that helped me make it.

Another short film of mine, Playday, was accepted to two festivals during my FIL, one of them in Columbus, so that was also nice. Students, former students, faculty and their children helped make that film.

Procrastination, motivation and time management.

I didn’t necessarily learn anything as much as I benefited spiritually from the experiences. Some of the things we had to contend with involve specific technical processes in post-production and producing the materials necessary for the film screenings and items requested by either the venue or the film festival programmers. In the film producing class we discuss with the students the importance of gathering the necessary elements for publicity during production and using them to help promote the film, and I always try to do that. The process of hiring an editor (Ahmad Ghanim, B.A. in Film 2021) to edit the trailer for I Am Kinloch was an experience that I’m formatting into a presentation. At some point, I might use the presentation in a class, as long as it fits the curriculum. I documented the entire process so it might be an interesting study on the evolution of a film trailer. I think he did a great job. For the most part, I was prepared for all of the opportunities that came up and having previously invested time into keeping track of things and maintaining a level of organization always seems to pay off.

Dialogue With Michael Ellison, Associate Professor of Theatre | Pippin and Retirement

Pippin is a Tony award winning musical that premiered on Broadway in 1972 and had a huge revival in 2013. Composer/lyricist Stephen Schwartz also wrote Godspell and Wicked. I love the show, especially for a college audience because it is about a young person on a quest for a life that is truly fulfilling. I believe Pippin, the main character, is a kind of “Everyperson.” My hope is that audience members will see something of themselves in this story and encouragement to find their own truth and not be swayed by others who have their own agenda.

It is especially exciting because the journey of this production began in 2019. We were in rehearsals in March 2020 when the world shut down. So, to finally have the opportunity to direct this show with its wonderful music and message is truly a gift. The wonderful cast is working hard, and we are having a lot of fun in the process.

This is a really tough question because there have been so many in the 23 years I have been here. Memories 

- of favorite shows: Into the Woods, Children of Eden, Chicago, Spring Awakening . . .

- of working with students for The American College Theatre Festival and being at the Kennedy Center in 2015 when Mariah Burks (with her acting partner David Baker) won the National Irene Ryan Scholarship Award 

- of being onstage with students when I played The Mysterious Man in Into the Woods, directed by graduate student David Sollish 

- of working with colleagues who truly care about our students and seeing so much growth over the years.

  • Getting my novel/fantasy/self-help book Being Magic: A Journey to (W)hole-ness published
  • Turning 50 breathing meditation videos into 3 audiobooks, with the help of BGSU grad Brent Winzek
  • Helping the duplex I own in Toledo’s Old West End blossom into the Space for Healing it is becoming – supported by huge beautiful cosmic murals Lynn Busch has painted and will be painting on walls and floors in my house
  • Focusing on my own healing practice - I do transformational body/energy work (chakras clearing, soul attunements, past life readings, etc.)
  • Traveling, visiting friends and continuing to learn grow
Michael-Ellison-THFM
Brad-Clark-THFM

Dialogue With Bradford Clark Professor of Theatre | The Magnificent Baron Munchausen: His Travels, Triumphs, and Tribulations

I wore several hats on Munchausen, which really started when I began carving a series of wooden puppet head replicas as a research project. Most were based upon photos of Czech museum originals. I eventually built a small repertory company, and it seemed to make sense to "cast" the figures in a show. So, I thought of Munchausen (which has often been dramatized for both conventional and puppet productions as well as films). It was then a matter of adapting the book into a script, designing the production, painting the scenic panels, and working with Seung-A “Liz” Lee (who created the costumes), prop master Kelly Mangan, costume shop manager Laurel Daman (who made the jellyfish and octopus), and scene shop manager / TD Danny Mangan - there was an army behind this! And following a "puppet boot camp" to begin the training of our non-puppeteer cast, I had to actually direct the show.

Puppet productions offer a lot of possibilities for imagination and creativity in staging and subject matter. And while there are wonderful cutting-edge productions out there that use various kinds of puppets in all sorts of new ways, I'm also quite fond of traditional folk puppetry (especially Czech and Slovak), which had a big influence upon this production. So hopefully students develop some curiosity about the genre, attend productions, study, and consider using puppet-related "tools" in their own work

Challenging and exhausting on all levels, but I like pushing myself imaginatively, developing my skills, and seeing what happens when others get inspired and make their own huge contributions. And there are moments when you are "in the zone" and the work is flowing - it's very satisfying!

Dialogue With Lucas Ostrowski Professor of Film | 4880 Studio Experience

The upcoming THFM 4880 Studio Experience is a short folk-horror film tentatively titled The One Within the Woods. Unlike previous studio experience projects, this one will use rotoscope animation to heighten the experience and expand the project's narrative scope. For Spring 2022, we are currently in pre-production in preparation for principal photography at the end of the semester. This will allow us to focus on the post-production process for Fall 2022.

Students gain hands-on experience while working in specific departments in preparation for the production and completion of the film. All enrolled students have an opportunity to take part in the collaborative process and gain experience of what it feels like to be a on a large-scale production. Every project and department has real world professional expectations and offers students an opportunity to gain experience and build confidence in different areas of interest. Ultimately, they learn that filmmaking is a creative, collaborative, and communicative process that takes a lot of planning, quick thinking, and problem solving in development of a final project.

Lucas-Ostrowski-THFM

Faculty Bios and Accomplishments

FACULTY

Angela Ahlgren, Associate Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies and Graduate Coordinator

Angela K. Ahlgren is the author of Drumming Asian America: Taiko, Performance, and Cultural Politics (Oxford, 2018) and is working on a series of essays on Asian influences in American dance and an ethnography of stage managers, gender, and invisible labor.

Award: ICS Faculty Fellowship, Institute for the Study of Culture and Society, BGSU, Spring 2023.

Conference Presentation: “Drastic (Japanese) Classicism: De-Stabilizing White Feminist Orientalism in the Choreographies of Karole Armitage,” Dance Studies Association (DSA), New Brunswick NJ, October 2021.

Conference Presentation: “Eggheads and Chrysanthemums: ‘Oriental’ Costumes as Scriptive Things in Modern Dance Archives,” Theatre History Symposium, Mid-America Theatre Conference (MATC), Chicago, IL, March 2020.

Conference Presentation: Panelist, “Teaching Critical Performance Theory” Chair: Jeanmarie Higgins, Pedagogy Symposium, Mid-America Theatre Conference (MATC), Chicago, IL, March 2020.

Conference Presentation: “Performing Theater Histories: Revising Performance Projects for the Contemporary Inclusive Classroom. Pedagogy of Extraordinary Bodies Working Group, American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR), Arlington, VA, November 2019.

Lecture/Talk: "’You Took a Part of Me’: Karole Armitage, Megumi Eda, and Drastic Japanese Classicism in New York.” De-Centering Japanese Performance lab, Dr. Jessica Nakamura, chair. University of California-Santa Barbara, June 2-5, 2022.

Lecture/Talk: “Taiko, Tradition, and Politics,” Lecture-demonstration with taiko artist Tiffany Tamaribuchi, PERF 101: Introduction to Performance Studies, Department of Performance Studies, Texas A&M University, Dr. Angenette Spalink, February 23, 2021. Via Zoom.

Lecture/Talk: “Taiko, Gender, and Sexuality,” Lecture-demonstration with taiko artist Tiffany Tamaribuchi, PERF 610: Dance Research, Department of Performance Studies, Texas A&M University, Dr. Angenette Spalink, February 25, 2021. Via Zoom.

Lecture/Talk: “Taiko, Tradition, and Politics,” Lecture-demonstration with taiko artist Tiffany Tamaribuchi, PERF 101: Introduction to Performance Studies, Department of Performance Studies, Texas A&M University, Dr. Kim Kattari, October 13, 2020. Via Zoom.

Lecture/Talk: “Taiko, Tradition, and Politics,” Lecture-demonstration with taiko artist Tiffany Tamaribuchi, PERF 101: Introduction to Performance Studies, Department of Performance Studies, Texas A&M University, Dr. Angenette Spalink, October 13, 2020. Via Zoom.
Webinar Presenter, “Womxn and Taiko—Moving Beyond Binaries: Gender and Racial Justice in Taiko,” Raging Asian Womxn Drummers and Taiko Community Alliance, Zoom (hosted from Toronto, ON), 22 August 2020.

Book Discussion: Drumming Asian America, MUSI002-C: Taiko and Asian American Experiences, Swarthmore College, Dr. Lei Ouyang, April 23, 2020. Via WebEx.

Lecture/Talk: “Taiko in the United States.” BGSU 1910: Global Citizens at BGSU: Introduction to Asian Studies, Dr. Kristen Rudisill, Bowling Green State University, October 2019.

Publication: “Asia and Alwin Nikolais: An Interdisciplinary Analysis of Orientalist Tendencies in Totem (1960) and Imago (1963).” Theatre History Studies 40 (2021): 73-100.

Publication: “Theory Over Time: Asian American Performance, Critical Theory, and the Theater History Survey.” Teaching Critical Performance Theory in Today’s Theater Classroom, Studio, and Community. Edited by Jeanmarie Higgins. (Routledge, 2020), 38-50.

Publication: Review. Wong, Deborah. Louder and Faster: Pain, Joy, and the Body Politic in Asian American Taiko. Yearbook for Traditional Music 52 (November 2020), 217-219.
Guest Co-editor with Dr. Victoria Fortuna, “Commingled Histories: Theatre and Dance,” a special section of Theatre History Studies, vol. 41 (2022).
Book Review Editor, Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, January 2020 – July 2022. 


Sara Chambers, Teaching Professor in Theatre

Completed 60 hours of training in Intimacy Direction and created policy and procedure documents on intimacy work for the department to implement. The documents are currently under review by the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee. 

Intimacy Direction Training:

“EDIT Media Intimacy Coordination Kickoff” Digital Workshop, EDIT Media 

“Best Practices in Intimacy Direction” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Working with Minors” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Trauma Informed Practices” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Consent in the Acting Classroom” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Race and Choreography” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Disability Awareness Training with Amelia Cavallo” Digital Workshop, Intimacy Professionals Association 

“Foundations in Race, Intimacy, and Consent” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education  

“Intimacy Choreography” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Intimacy Coordination” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Studio Techniques, Casting, and Policy”, Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education. 

“Out-of-Office Hours: Q & A with Theatrical Intimacy Education”, Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

“Best Practices in Intimacy Direction” Digital Workshop, Theatrical Intimacy Education 

One on One training in Intimacy Direction with Adam Noble at The Alley Theatre, Houston, TX

Earned a certification in Adult Mental Health First Aid USA, National Council for Mental Wellbeing 

Production Work: The Amateurs, Donnell Theatre, October 2021. BGSU Department of Theatre & Film. 

Production Work: A Bright New Boise, Online Production, October 2020. BGSU Department of Theatre and Film. 

Production Work: Collective Rage: A Play in 5 Betties, Eva Marie Saint Theatre, February 2020. BGSU Department of Theatre & Film. 

Production Work: White Rabbit, Red Rabbit, Broken Spectacle Productions with Alpha Psi Omega, Eva Marie Saint Theatre, Bowling Green, OH, August 2019. 


D. Amy-Rose Forbes-Erikson, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies

D. A-R. Forbes-Erickson (she/her/hers) specializes in theatre history, performance studies, theatre practice-as-research, historiography, and dramatic literature.  

Her current book project, “Caribbean Masquerades as Palimpsests from the Late Seventeenth Century to the Early Twenty-First Century,” is a performance study and historical survey that traces the emergence of selected masquerade characters from the point of contact between European conquest and Indigenous, African, and Asian peoples in the Caribbean. 

Her research has been published in areas of African, African American, Latin American, and Caribbean theatres and performances in Anthurium: A Caribbean Studies Journal, Theatre/Practice, a book chapter in Africans and the Politics of Popular Culture, and a paper, “Performance ‘Art’ - Dismantling Structural Racism in Colonial Monuments” in Nakan: A Journal of Cultural Studies (forthcoming). 

She has presented scholarly papers at national conferences at the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE), Mid-America Theatre Conference (MATC), the Black Theatre Network (BTN) and the Comparative Drama Conference (CDC) in the USA; and at international conferences at the Caribbean Studies Association (CSA) in Brazil and Trinidad and Tobago, and at the British Forum for Ethnomusicology Annual Conference in Winchester, England. 

In her artistic practice, Amy-Rose is a director/designer. She founded the Pan-African Theatre Ensemble (PATE), dedicated to the research and production of theatres in the African continuum, directing seven productions. She has taken the PATE to perform at the Fringe Theatre Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland through the International Collegiate Theatre Festival program in the summer, 2019. 

Selected directing includes Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884–1915. Wole Soyinka’s The Bacchae of Euripides: A Communion Rite, Suzan-Lori Parks’s Venus, Francisco Arriví’s Vejigantes (Devil Mask), and Dennis Scott’s An Echo in the Bone.  

She earned a PhD in Theatre: Performance as Public Practice and a doctoral portfolio in African and African American Studies, specializing in the African Diaspora from the University of Texas at Austin. 

Conference Presentation: “Caribbean Masquerades as Palimpsests from the Late Seventeenth Century to the Early Twenty-First Century: La Mulata, Dougla, Ship-yit-(t)diam, Vejigantes, and Black Indian” International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR) Conference, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-24, 2022. 

Conference Presentation: “Caribbean Masquerades as Palimpsest Performances: Towards Reparative Justice.” Caribbean Studies Association (CSA) Conference, Kingston, Jamaica (Virtual), May 30 – June 3, 2022 

Conference Presentation: “Afro-Dystopian Visions: Theatre Practice-as Research and The Running Black Man in Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Südwestafrika, Between the Years 1884–1915” Mid-America Theatre Conference (MATC), Cleveland, Ohio,​ March 3-6, 2022.  

Conference Presentation: “Technoculture in Performance: Black and Indigenous Performance Presented by the Pan-African Theatre Ensemble and the Afro Caribbean Ensemble” Culture Club Annual Conference, 2022, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, February 18-19, 2022 

Conference Presentation: “Digital Practice Research, Multilingualism, and the Black Character in Mwatabu​ Okantah’s Epic Poem, Cheikh Anta Diop: Poem for the Living.​ Mid-American Theatre Conference (MATC), Chicago, Il March 4-8, 2020.   

Production Work Outside of BGSU: Directing, Devised Showcase. Performed by the Pan-African Theatre Ensemble (Bowling Green State University) at the International Collegiate Theatre Festival (ICTF)​ in the Fringe Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland, August 2022  

Production Work Outside of BGSU: Directing Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 by Anna Deavere Smith, Black Swamp Players, Bowling Green, Ohio, May 25-28, 2022  

Production Work Outside of BGSU: Director, We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884–1915 by Jackie Sibblies Drury, virtual production, Department of Theatre and Dance, California State University, Sacramento, opened and streaming online on demand, April 21-25, 2021.  

Production Work Outside of BGSU: Devised & Directed: ​Digital Masks to Africa – Cheikh Anta Diop: A Poem for the Living ​by Mwatabu Okantah. Performed by the Pan-African Theatre Ensemble (Kent State University) at the International Collegiate Theatre Festival (ICTF)​ in the Fringe Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland, August 2019. 

Publication: Forbes-Erickson, D. A-R. “Performance ‘Art’ - Dismantling Structural Racism in Colonial Monuments.” Nakan: A Journal of Cultural Studies, 2022 (Forthcoming March 2022) 

Publication: Forbes-Erickson, D. A-R. ““Balls at Kingston to the ‘Brown Girls’,”1: A Palimpsest for Bleached Brown Skins in Jamaican Dancehall.” Anthurium A Caribbean Studies Journal, vol. 17, no. 1, 2021, p. 9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.33596/anth.368   

Publication: Forbes-Erickson, D. Amy-Rose. “Theatre Practice-as-Research in Staging Black Feminist​ (Re)Memorials in Pan-African Plays: ‘Vejigantes’ by Francisco Arriví and ‘The Purple Flower’ by Marita Bonner.​​” Forbes-Erickson, D. Amy-Rose. “Theatre Practice-as-Research in Staging Black Feminist​ (Re)Memorials in Pan-African Plays: ‘Vejigantes’ by Francisco Arriví and ‘The Purple Flower’ by Marita Bonner.​​” Theatre/Practice: The Online Journal of the Practice/Production Symposium​ of the Mid America Theatre Conference​. Vol. 8. 2019. Theatre Practice as Research in Staging: http://www.theatrepractice.us/volume8.html


Lesa Lockford, Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies and Department Chair

Lesa Lockford teaches courses in theatre and performance studies. Her teaching and scholarly interests include performance methods and composition, gender and sexuality, qualitative methods and alternative forms of scholarly representation including creative non-fiction and autoethnography. Journals in which her publications have appeared include Theatre Topics, Text and Performance Quarter, Qualitative Inquiry, and The International Review of Qualitative Inquiry, among others. Her book, Performing Femininity: Rewriting Gender Identity was published by AltaMira in 2004. She has performed her original creative works and works by others at regional, national, and international academic conferences. Before returning to the Academy to pursue graduate Studies, she trained and worked as a professional actor in the United Kingdom. She is also a frequent narrator of audiobooks. 

Conference Presentation: Lockford, Lesa. “Fatigue, Resistance, and Wonder: Hope as ‘Equipment for Living.’” In the Dystopian and Utopian Dialectics: Autoethnographies of Hope and Transformation panel, International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, virtual, forthcoming May 2022.   

Conference Presentation: “Personal and Political Anxiety and the Ablation of American Exceptionalism,” Autoethnography in the Age of Anxiety panel, International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, virtual, May 2021.  

Conference Presentation: “Song of Walt, of America, and of Myself,” Creative Longevity panel, National Communication Association annual meeting, virtual, November 2020. 

Conference Presentation: “Resisting Decline,” Flipping the Script panel at the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, May 2020, canceled.  

Conference Presentation: Anxiously Waiting : Ambiguous Loss, Memory, and Ghosts, Autoethnography in the Age of Anxiety panel, International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, May 2020, canceled.  

Conference Presentation: “Surviving Our Aging: A Love Letter for My Mom,” Inhabiting the Mystery: Surviving Aging, Time, Love, and Loss panel at the National Communication Association annual meeting, Baltimore, MD, Nov. 2019. 

Plenary Panel Presenter, “Masking/Truth,” International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry virtual conference, forthcoming, May 2022.  

Lecture/Talk: “The Actor’s Voice: Training Approaches, Challenges, and Goals,” Invited Presentation, Grand Valley State University World Voice Day, April 17, 2020. 

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator for The Teen Interpreter: A Guide to the Challenges and Joys of Raising Adolescents by Terri Apter, Dreamscape Media LLC, May 2022. 

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator for “Felicity” in an ensemble cast of A Slow Ruin by Pamela Crane. Dreamscape Media LLC, February 2022.  

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator for How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed by Slavenka Drakulić, Dreamscape Audiobooks, August 2021.  

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator for How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed by Slavenka Drakulić, Dreamscape Audiobooks, August 2021.   

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook, ensemble cast, Queen Mouserings, in The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, by E. T. A. Hoffman, Dreamscape Audiobooks, August 2021.   

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator, Nives by Sacha Naspini, Dreamscape Audiobooks, June 2021.  

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator, Pinocchio: The Tale of a Puppet by C. Collodi, Dreamscape Audiobooks, December 2020. 

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator, Prophetic Secrets: Learning the Language of Heaven, by Jennifer Eivaz, Dreamscape Audiobooks, June 2020. 

Production Work Outside BGSU: Audiobook Narrator, “The Legend of Lightning Lizzie” by Marie Whitaker, in Weird Tales, Dreamscape Audiobooks, June 2020. 

Publication: “Surviving Our Aging: A Love Letter for My Mom,” forthcoming in Narrative and Grief: Stories of Loss, edited by Deleasa Randall and Patricia English-Schneider, contract pending with Routledge.  

Publication: Co-authored with Ronald J. Pelias, “A Collaborative Dialogue on the Dialogic Influence of Art Bochner and Carolyn Ellis,” Advances in Autoethnography and Narrative Inquiry: Reflecting on the Legacy of Carolyn Ellis and Art Bochner, Foundations and Futures Series, Routledge. Edited by Tony Adams, Robin Boylorn, and Lisa Tillman; 2021.   

Publication: Co-authored with Ronald J. Pelias and Tami Spry, “A Collaboration: Connected to, Constituted by, and Comfort in the Other,” International Review of Qualitative Research, Vol. 14.2 2021, 226-236.

Tragedy: a tragedy, by Will Eno. BGSU Department of Theatre and Film production, Donnell Theatre, and presented livestreamed on ShowTix4U, March 5 and 6, 2021.  


Jarod Mariani, Doctoral Candidate

Conference Presentations: MATC, Cleveland, OH, March 2022, Playwrighting Symposium (Actor), Coasters by Dan Kipp.

Invited Lectures/Talks: “Fitness for the Performer” workshop, BGSU Arts-X, December 2022, Bowling Green, OH.

Production Work Outside BGSU: Spectacular Riches Commercial, the Ohio Lottery, Role – Spectacular Riches Winner, Columbus, OH, January 2020.

Production Work Outside BGSU: Shoe Headquarters Commercial, Designer Shoe Warehouse, Role – Roger the Shoe Savant, Cleveland, OH, July 2020.

Production Work Outside BGSU: Short Film, Role – Jacob, Title – The Circle, Bowling Green, OH, June 2021, in post-production.


Story Moosa, Doctoral Student

Graduated: MFA in Acting, Long Island University, 2020

Production Work Outside of BGSU: Rose Colored Glass by Janice L. Goldberg and Susan Bigelow, Ripple Effect Artists, Role- Peg O’Riley, 2020

Began Ph.D. Program, BGSU, 2021


Heidi L. Nees, Assistant Professor of Theatre

Award: Robert A. Schanke Theatre Research Award, Mid-America Theatre Conference, Paper title: “Present Perfect Tense: Revolutionizing Dramatic Narratives through Living History at the Oconaluftee Indian Village,” March 2022 

Award: Teaching & Learning Certificate of Appreciation, Center for Faculty Excellence, Bowling Green State University, March 2020 

Conference Presentation: “Present Perfect Tense: Revolutionizing Dramatic Narratives through Living History at the Oconoluftee Indian Village,” Mid-America Theatre Conference, Cleveland, March 2022 

Roundtable Participant: “Commingled Histories,” Mid-America Theatre Conference, Virtual, March 2022 

Conference Presentation: “Re-Righting Cherokee History in Mary Kathryn Nagle’s Sovereignty,” Association for Theatre in Higher Education, Virtual, August 2021 

Roundtable Participant: “Decolonizing Institutional Norms II: A Breakout Session,” Association for Theatre in Higher Education, Virtual; August 2020 

Conference Presentation: “You Shall Play it in a Mask”: Dramaturgically Negotiating Representation in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Co-authored with Dr. Stephannie Gearhart (Department of English, BGSU), Mid-America Theatre Conference, Chicago, March 2020 

Panel Participation: “’Did I Do the Thing I Don't Want to Do?': Honest Reflections on (un)Learning,” Day of Dialogue with Diversity and Belonging, Division of Diversity and Belonging, Bowling Green State University, Fall 2020 

Publication: Nees, Heidi L. “Parlor Performances: Annie Oakley’s Performances of American Victorianism.” Theatre Annual, vol. 72 (Fall 2019) 1-21. 

Publication: Gearhart, Stephannie and Heidi L. Nees. “‘You Shall Play it in a Mask”: Dramaturgically Negotiating Representation in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Theatre Topics, vol. 32.1 (March 2022)7-17. 

Publication: Nees, Heidi L. Review of Blood Brothers and Peace Pipes: Performing the Wild West in German Festivals by A. Dana Weber. H-German, H-Net Reviews (May 2021). https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=56097. 

Speaker Series: In the Round, a six-part speaker series featuring Native American Creatives Developed with Jenn Stucker, BGSU School of Art https://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/in-the-round.html 

Grant: Glanz Family Research Award, Co-recipient with Jenn Stucker (BGSU School of Art), Project Title: In the Round, a six-part speaker series featuring Indigenous and Native American Creatives, Amount: $6,000 

Grant: Ethnic Cultural Arts Program (ECAP) Grant, Co-recipient with Jenn Stucker (BGSU School of Art), Project Title: In the Round, a six-part speaker series featuring Indigenous and Native American Creatives, Amount: $2,720 


Cortland Rankin, Assistant Professor Film Studies

Cortland Rankin started as an Assistant Professor of Film Studies in the Department of Theatre and Film in Fall 2019. His primary research areas include various facets of the relationship between film and postindustrial American urbanism and war cinema and media, particularly as it concerns cultural memory. Much of his scholarly work on the intersection of cinema and urbanism has historically centered on postwar New York. He currently has a book under contract at Routledge entitled Decline and Reimagination in Cinematic New York, which examines cinematic representations of New York from the mid-1960s through the mid-1980s across mainstream, independent, documentary, and experimental films and places the dominant discourse of urban decline in dialogue with marginal perspectives that reimagine the city along alternative paths as a resilient, adaptive, and endlessly inspiring place. Specifically, the book analyzes how filmmakers mobilized derelict space and various articulations of “nature” as settings and signifiers that decenter traditional understandings of the city to represent New York alternately as a wasteland, a wilderness, a playground, a home, an art space, and an ecosystem. Although not specifically focused on New York, he also recently contributed a chapter on the New York-set Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Steve Barron, 1990) as an independent film to the forthcoming anthology Screening American Independent Film (Routledge) edited by Justin Wyatt and Wyatt Phillips. 

Rankin’s second area of research expertise concerns war cinema and he is currently pursuing a project on Korean War cinema and television. He published two book chapters on Korean War and Iraq War films as war memorials titled “‘A Quiet Day at the Front’: Realism as an Act of Memorialization in Cease Fire (1953)” and “Their War, Our War: Private Memory and Public Commemoration in Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (2016)” in Hollywood R*A*W: Remembrance and American War (Routledge, 2020) edited by Andrew Rayment and Paul Nadasdy. He also wrote an article that is currently under review at Film History: An International Journal titled “Forgettable Films of the Forgotten War: American Cinema and the Erasure of the Korean War,” portions of which he also presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS) Conference in March 2021 and as part of the American Culture Studies’ Culture Club speaker series in March 2022. His paper at the 2022 SCMS conference – “Forgotten Faces of the Forgotten War: Representations of East Asians in English-Language Korean War Cinema and TV” – is a further extension of this Korean War scholarship. Rankin also published a book review of Martial Culture, Silver Screen: War Movies and the Construction of American Identity edited by Matthew Christopher Hulbert and Matthew E. Stanley for the New Review of Film and Television Studies in fall of 2021.

A Look Ahead – 2022-2023 Season

The Harvest by Samuel D. Hunter, Eva Marie Saint Theatre, October 20-22, 27-28, 2022, at 8:00PM and October 22-23 and 29 at 2:00PM

She Kills Monsters by Qui Nguyen, Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre, November 17-19, 2022, at 8:00PM and November 19-20 at 2:00PM

Fall Dance Concert, Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre, February 3-4, 2023, at 8:00PM

Electra, by Euripides, Eva Marie Saint Theatre, February 16-18, 23-25, 2023, at 8:00PM and February 18-19 and 25, 2023, at 2:00PM

The Evil Dead: The Musical, book by George Reinblatt and Music by Frank Cipolla, Christopher Bond, Melissa Orris and George Reinblatt, Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre, April 13-15, 2023, at 8:00PM and April 15-16, 2023, at 2:00PM

Pippin Group Photo

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Updated: 05/26/2022 11:07AM