Parent-Child Time Together, Social Status, and the Well-being of Children and Adolescents

Melissa A. Milkie, University of Maryland, College Park
Kei Nomaguchi
Parent-Child Time Together, Social Status, and the Well-being of Children and Adolescents

This project examines whether and how parental time is related to the well-being of children and adolescents. Using time diary data from the Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID-CDS-Waves 1and 2), we examine the following questions:

  1. How are three types of mother-child time and father-child time—accessible time, engaged time, and cultural-capital time—linked to offspring emotional, behavioral and academic well-being?
  2. Does the extent to which the three types of mother-child time and father-child time are related to child well-being vary by social statuses (e.g., social class, race/ethnicity) and the child’s age?
  3. Does the quality of mother-child and father-child relationship (e.g., warmth, harshness) matter more than the amount of the three types of mother-child and father-child time for children’s emotional, behavioral, and academic well-being?

JOURNAL ARTICLE:
Milkie, Melissa, A., Kei M. Nomaguchi, and Kathleen E. Denny. 2015. “Does the Amount of Time Mothers Spend with Children or Adolescents Matter?” Journal of Marriage and Family 77: 355 – 372. doi: 10.1111/jomf.12170

CFDR WORKING PAPER:
2012-17    Melissa A. Milkie, Kei M. Nomaguchi, and Kathleen E. Denny. “How Does the Amount of Time Mothers Spend with Children Matter?”