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Resume

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Your resume provides the first impression a potential employer will have of you.  Make it count.
Click the links below to explore resources to help you create an excellent resume.

General Tips

  1. RESUME BUILDING PROCESS:
    • Write and refine content.
    • Design layout and navigation.
  2. Avoid empty white space.  It makes your resume appear incomplete and lacking in areas.  Utilize entire line length, don’t create unnecessary line breaks, resulting in empty space.
  3. "Save As" 
    • Always save/send as pdf file.  It is universal and won't change your document on the receiving end.
    • Don't vaguely name your resume file as E.g. "Resume 2". Use your name, E.g. "Thomas_Siebenaler_Resume"
  4. Consistency.  All text should be uniform and professional.  Section headings should be identical.
  5. Avoid writing too much.  Write short and to-the-point.  Think newspaper headlines.  Use lists.
  6. Multiple pages.  It’s OK to have more than one page for your resume, but if you do, the subsequent pages should be at least 1/2 a page (not partial or 1 or 2 lines) and must not repeat any information.  
  7. This is a test.  Your resume serves as a writing example, showcasing how you organize and interpret information and how effectively you communicate.  Proofread everything and don’t trust spellcheck.
  8. Don’t limit yourself by telling an employer how much you feel you know about a certain program, skill, etc.  (“Limited knowledge”, “Some experience with…”) They could misinterprit your skill level.
  9. Fluff.  Generally, avoid overusing terms such as, good attendance, team-player, multitasking, etc.  Employers refer to this as "fluff", using valueable space on already assumed traits, adding no value.

SAMPLE RESUME

You can use this resume as a guide to get you started on your own.  Click the link below to open.

Other Sample Resumes

Click to see if you can find resume errors.

Sample terms to use when writing your resume.

SECTION NAME SAMPLES

Listed below are terms you can use to title each section of your resume. You are not restricted to using only these and are encouraged to create your own as well.

Education Objective
Career Goal
Experience
Career History
Awards
Personal
Achievements
Scholarships
Qualifications
Honors
Related Coursework
Activities
Prof. Affiliations
Skills
Interests
Technical
Volunteer
Work
Software
Community


SECTION-BY-SECTION TIPS:

Click on each section tab below for specific advice on that section.

OBJECTIVE/SUMMARY STATEMENT:

This is an optional section of your resume and should tell the person reading your resume why they are reading it.  It should be a very specific career statement, nothing more (one sentence).  Some employers feel this is necessary, others do not.  You need to make a personal decision whether you wish to include this.  If it does not add any real value to your resume, leave it off, it will detract from your resume more than add to it.

VERY IMPORTANT: If you’re searching for an internship or co-op, don’t include only that you are searching for “co-ops” and/or “internships”.   A job that can count for these does not have to be named a “co-op”, etc. to be approved.  As long as you are hired for a job that meets the requirements, you’re good to go.  You should state you are searching for a “position” (keep it simple, not too much at first). 

EDUCATION:

In addition to the “general” information (Name of school, location, major, etc.) be sure to include:

  • Activities participated in
  • Honors received    
  • Groups involved with
  • Events/Workshops attended
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Anything showing you've done more than simply complete coursework

EXPERIENCE:

When listing previous experience(s) (formal or informal) the most important details are describing your job duties, what skills you obtained on the job.  These tell the employer what talents, skills, and abilities you have that can now be used for their advantage.

At present, you may have too little listed under your positions, describing the tasks you completed in that position.  Don't sell yourself short.  Even if you do not think it is relevant or important, any piece of information you write on your resume can act as a catalyst for that employer to notice you.  The more you leave off, the greater you increase your chances of not making a connection with that employer.

SKILLS/TALENTS/ABILITIES:

This section can be used as a utility section, meaning a place to highlight yourself and the skills you have acquired throughout your life.  These skills can include those learned in the classroom or from previous jobs you have had.  They might also include a skill you’ve taught yourself, something you’ve learned from your grandfather, mother, father, brother, friend, etc.

Delete terms like, "Great leadership skills" and "Positive attitude".  This is referred to by employers as "fluff", meaning the listing of skills that you are already assumed to have and that most everyone puts on their resume, adding no real value.


Some skills you could list include, but are not limited to:

Entrepreneur
Professional Writing
Persuasion
Decision-making
Teachable
Self-Motivating
Social
Accounting
Financing
Technology
Computer Literate
Purchasing
Marketing
Self-Employed
Project Management
Creativity
Public Speaking
Leader
Seasoned Traveler
Presenter
Data Processing
Bookkeeping
Statistics
Data Management
Sales
Phone Skills
Negotiation
Critical Thinking
Memory/Retention
Scheduling
Budget Management
Inventing
Fundraising
Promotions
Researching Management

You may also list skills acquired through religious activities, community service, volunteering, activism, etc.  Do not leave something off this list because you feel it does not apply to the position you are applying for, you never know what might make a connection with an employer so list it all and let them decide.  Some examples include:

"Machinery operation"
"Public speaking and leadership"
"Small engine repair"
"Piano composition and performance"
"Farm operations and mechanics"
"Photography and Fine Art skills" "Can speak multiple languages"

Also, don’t limit yourself by telling an employer how much you feel you know about a certain program, etc.  (using terms like: “Limited knowledge of” or “Some experience with…”)  It is the employer’s responsibility to determine how much knowledge you have on a given subject or skill-set.  If you tell them how much you think you know, they make mistakenly assume your words for something less than you are intending and they may disregard those skills altogether.  Don’t give them that opportunity and simply list the knowledge you have in basic, general terms.

AFFILIATIONS/PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:

This section is where you could list organizations, groups, professional development networks, etc. where a connection might be made with an employer.  Some examples include:

  • American Marketing Association (AMA)
  • International Business Association (IBA)
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • American Society of Women Accountants (ASWA)
  • Beta Alpha Psi
  • Business Professionals of America (BPA)
  • Church affiliations and leadership
  • Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO)
  • BGSU Student Organizations
  • The American Finance Association (AFA)
  • Boy Scouts of America
  • The Graphic Professionals Resource Network
  • American Red Cross
  • Volunteer organizations      

EXTRACURRICULAR:

This section can be used to list experiences, activities, or skill-sets that don't quite fit in other categories.  Some might include, but are not limited to:

  • Theater, Music & Arts
  • Athletics
  • Religious/Spiritual
  • Robotics
  • Journalism
  • Drama
  • Competitions
  • Model Court, UN, etc.
  • Student Government

HONORS/AWARDS:

List any honors or awards you have received here.  Some might include, but are not limited to:

  • Scholarships
  • Athletics
  • Academic awards
  • Extracurricular

REFERENCES:

List your references on a separate document, not on your resume.  Use the space on your resume to list your attributes and skills, not your references.  Your references should be given to an employer only after they have expressed an initial interest, not before.  Listing 3 references is typical, however, be sure to provide the employer the exact number they request.

REFERENCE PAGE FORMAT:

  1. Start with a new document.
  2. Copy/paste your name/contact information from your resume.
  3. List your references below, using same information found on a typical business card.

EXAMPLE:

Pat C. Smith
3003 West Chester Lane, Denver, CO 80013
patcs@email.com        303-555-1212

 

REFERENCES

 

Reference Name One
Company Name Listed Here
Title, Office
Address 1
Address 2
City, State  Zip
Phone
Email


Reference Name Two
Company Name Listed Here
Title, Office
Address 1
Address 2
City, State  Zip
Phone
Emai
 

Reference Name Three
Company Name Listed Here
Title, Office
Address 1
Address 2
City, State  Zip
Phone
Email