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RICHARD B. ANDERSON

Associate Professor
B.A. (Pre-law) and Ph.D. (Psychology), Pennsylvania State University

Phone: (419) 372-9908
Email: randers@bgnet.bgsu.edu
Office: 251 Psychology
Lab Page: Complex Cognition
CV: DOC

Research Interests:

I am a cognitive psychologist interested in how judgment, memory, and inference interact with the informational environment. Thus, my work can be construed as an ecological approach to the study of cognition. Currently, I am pursuing ecological and mechanistic accounts of how people informally and intuitively make use of small samples to draw conclusions about correlational and causal relationships. My research is aimed at contributing to an explanation of how beliefs are distributed across populations. Thus, the work has broader impacts with respect to social and political cognition. I welcome new students who are interested in cognitive science and who are willing to explore the mathematical underpinnings of cognition, as well as its socio-political implications. I am also interested in sponsoring students who would like to pursue dual degrees in psychology and computer science. Further information can be found on my lab web page (above).

Taking Graduate Students? Yes

Sponsoring Undergraduate Research? Yes

Selected Publications:

Doherty, M. E., Anderson, R. B., Kelley, A. M., and Albert, J. H. (2009). Probabilistically valid inference of covariation from a single x,y observation when univariate characteristics are known. Cognitive science, 33, 183-205.

Anderson, R. B., Doherty, M. E., & Friedrich, J. C. (2008). Sample size and  correlation inference. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 929-944.

Anderson, R. B., Doherty, M. E., Berg, N. D., & Friedrich, J. C. (2005). Sample size and the detection of correlation—A signal detection account: Comment on Kareev (2000) and Juslin and Olsson (2005). Psychological Review, 112, 268-279.

Anderson, R. B., Tweney, R., Rivardo, M., & Duncan, S. (1997). Need probability affects retention: A direct demonstration. Memory & Cognition, 25, 867-872.

Courses Taught:

  • PSYC 101. General Psychology (undergraduate)
  • PSYC 290. Laboratory Methods (undergraduate)
  • PSYC 668. Analysis of Variance (graduate)
  • PSYC 712. Cognitive Psychology (graduate)